FIDO/Rogers MPD

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

Apparently they are suffering from Multiple Personality Disorder.

I was in downtown Toronto where I expected to be on the Fido network instead
I was switched to Rogers,

Then I was out in the 'boonies' north of Brampton where I expected to be on
the Rogers network instead I was on FIDO.

Lastly I was at home sitting in the same chair, yesterday I was on Rogers,
today I am on FIDO.
Not that I care, as long as my calls go through and I am not charged any
extra. Just find it very curious how the switching is decided.

Testy
9 answers Last reply
More about fido rogers
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    "Testy" <fraudbuster@canoemail.com> wrote in
    news:7Askd.22819$Z7.744238@news20.bellglobal.com:

    > Apparently they are suffering from Multiple Personality Disorder.
    >
    > I was in downtown Toronto where I expected to be on the Fido network
    > instead I was switched to Rogers,
    >
    > Then I was out in the 'boonies' north of Brampton where I expected to
    > be on the Rogers network instead I was on FIDO.
    >
    > Lastly I was at home sitting in the same chair, yesterday I was on
    > Rogers, today I am on FIDO.
    > Not that I care, as long as my calls go through and I am not charged
    > any extra. Just find it very curious how the switching is decided.


    You can avoid all the switching by just manually selecting the network you
    want to use on your phone.

    I think switching is done based on whichever signal is strongest.....
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    Free until end of February 2005, Fido subscribers can roam on Rogers
    Wireless network and Rogers Wireless subscribers can roam on Fido's. It will
    be $5/month extra for Fido subscribers if they want to continue roaming on
    RW. Otherwise, it'll be switched off. RW subscribers will always be free to
    roam on Fido network.

    So, right now, whoever has the strongest signal at where you are registers
    you handset.


    "Testy" <fraudbuster@canoemail.com> wrote in message
    news:7Askd.22819$Z7.744238@news20.bellglobal.com...
    > Apparently they are suffering from Multiple Personality Disorder.
    >
    > I was in downtown Toronto where I expected to be on the Fido network
    > instead I was switched to Rogers,
    >
    > Then I was out in the 'boonies' north of Brampton where I expected to be
    > on the Rogers network instead I was on FIDO.
    >
    > Lastly I was at home sitting in the same chair, yesterday I was on Rogers,
    > today I am on FIDO.
    > Not that I care, as long as my calls go through and I am not charged any
    > extra. Just find it very curious how the switching is decided.
    >
    > Testy
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    Doesn't explain why the network changes when I am in exactly the same
    position.

    \Testy
    \
    "lurker" <lurker@this.ng> wrote in message
    news:10p77r6f59sbmdc@corp.supernews.com...
    > Free until end of February 2005, Fido subscribers can roam on Rogers
    > Wireless network and Rogers Wireless subscribers can roam on Fido's. It
    > will be $5/month extra for Fido subscribers if they want to continue
    > roaming on RW. Otherwise, it'll be switched off. RW subscribers will
    > always be free to roam on Fido network.
    >
    > So, right now, whoever has the strongest signal at where you are registers
    > you handset.
    >
    >
    > "Testy" <fraudbuster@canoemail.com> wrote in message
    > news:7Askd.22819$Z7.744238@news20.bellglobal.com...
    >> Apparently they are suffering from Multiple Personality Disorder.
    >>
    >> I was in downtown Toronto where I expected to be on the Fido network
    >> instead I was switched to Rogers,
    >>
    >> Then I was out in the 'boonies' north of Brampton where I expected to be
    >> on the Rogers network instead I was on FIDO.
    >>
    >> Lastly I was at home sitting in the same chair, yesterday I was on
    >> Rogers, today I am on FIDO.
    >> Not that I care, as long as my calls go through and I am not charged any
    >> extra. Just find it very curious how the switching is decided.
    >>
    >> Testy
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    It is a system based on radio signals. One day Roger's may be stronger due
    to atmosperic conditions, one day Fido might be stronger because of a
    different scenario. I would assume that both signals are almost equal in
    strength at that given location.

    BTW there is more than the weather that affects radio waves, so it could be
    any number of factors thatdetermine which will be stronger, my answer is
    just one possible solution.

    G M

    "Testy" <fraudbuster@canoemail.com> wrote in message
    news:2YNkd.40543$km5.1651628@news20.bellglobal.com...
    > Doesn't explain why the network changes when I am in exactly the same
    > position.
    >
    > \Testy
    > \
    > "lurker" <lurker@this.ng> wrote in message
    > news:10p77r6f59sbmdc@corp.supernews.com...
    >> Free until end of February 2005, Fido subscribers can roam on Rogers
    >> Wireless network and Rogers Wireless subscribers can roam on Fido's. It
    >> will be $5/month extra for Fido subscribers if they want to continue
    >> roaming on RW. Otherwise, it'll be switched off. RW subscribers will
    >> always be free to roam on Fido network.
    >>
    >> So, right now, whoever has the strongest signal at where you are
    >> registers you handset.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Testy" <fraudbuster@canoemail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:7Askd.22819$Z7.744238@news20.bellglobal.com...
    >>> Apparently they are suffering from Multiple Personality Disorder.
    >>>
    >>> I was in downtown Toronto where I expected to be on the Fido network
    >>> instead I was switched to Rogers,
    >>>
    >>> Then I was out in the 'boonies' north of Brampton where I expected to be
    >>> on the Rogers network instead I was on FIDO.
    >>>
    >>> Lastly I was at home sitting in the same chair, yesterday I was on
    >>> Rogers, today I am on FIDO.
    >>> Not that I care, as long as my calls go through and I am not charged any
    >>> extra. Just find it very curious how the switching is decided.
    >>>
    >>> Testy
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 13:12:14 -0500, Testy wrote:

    > Doesn't explain why the network changes when I am in exactly the same
    > position.

    With radio signals something like a car passing in front of your house can
    cause one signal to be stronger then the other. It's the nature of radio.
    TTYL
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    Well, no switching has taken place since the day after the take over. I
    figure it was just the NEW DOG peeing on the tree to establish his
    territory.

    Testy

    "repatch" <repatch42@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:pan.2004.11.11.19.31.44.221963@yahoo.com...
    > On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 13:12:14 -0500, Testy wrote:
    >
    >> Doesn't explain why the network changes when I am in exactly the same
    >> position.
    >
    > With radio signals something like a car passing in front of your house can
    > cause one signal to be stronger then the other. It's the nature of radio.
    > TTYL
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    Umm, that's the point. In the past you didn't have access to Fido's
    network, so for all intents and purposes Fido's network didn't exist. Now
    you do, so all of a sudden you have more signals available to you,
    switching is an obvious side effect of this.

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 11:59:38 -0500, Testy wrote:

    > Well, no switching has taken place since the day after the take over. I
    > figure it was just the NEW DOG peeing on the tree to establish his
    > territory.
    >
    > Testy
    >
    > "repatch" <repatch42@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:pan.2004.11.11.19.31.44.221963@yahoo.com...
    >> On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 13:12:14 -0500, Testy wrote:
    >>
    >>> Doesn't explain why the network changes when I am in exactly the same
    >>> position.
    >>
    >> With radio signals something like a car passing in front of your house
    >> can cause one signal to be stronger then the other. It's the nature of
    >> radio. TTYL
    >>
    >>
  8. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    From what I read before: the GSM transmitter can force your phone to switch
    if the tranmistter is getting congested. So, not only signal level controls
    it, but also how many users are registered on a certain transmitter.

    Also, some users may never see switching because their phones don't support
    the necessary frequencies for both Rogers & Fido...


    repatch wrote:

    > Umm, that's the point. In the past you didn't have access to Fido's
    > network, so for all intents and purposes Fido's network didn't exist. Now
    > you do, so all of a sudden you have more signals available to you,
    > switching is an obvious side effect of this.
    >
    > On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 11:59:38 -0500, Testy wrote:
    >
    > > Well, no switching has taken place since the day after the take over. I
    > > figure it was just the NEW DOG peeing on the tree to establish his
    > > territory.
    > >
    > > Testy
    > >
    > > "repatch" <repatch42@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > > news:pan.2004.11.11.19.31.44.221963@yahoo.com...
    > >> On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 13:12:14 -0500, Testy wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> Doesn't explain why the network changes when I am in exactly the same
    > >>> position.
    > >>
    > >> With radio signals something like a car passing in front of your house
    > >> can cause one signal to be stronger then the other. It's the nature of
    > >> radio. TTYL
    > >>
    > >>
  9. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    An observation: I live in Ottawa and manually switched my phone to
    the Rogers network once I heard I could roam on it for free. One:
    whereas I can just dial the 7 digit number for a local call while on
    the Fido network, you have to dial the 10 digit number while roaming
    on Rogers, as if you were really roaming (ie from out of town).
    Second: During busy periods (Saturday, Sunday night), I get 'Network
    Busy' when trying to roam on the Rogers network all night. When I
    switch back to the Fido network, I can make the calls (but do
    occasionally get a 'Network Busy' there as well). I have no idea how
    roaming works, but is it possible for them to set up the network to
    give preference to some users (ie their subscribers) over others
    (roamers, Fido customers)?

    nospam <nospam@nospam.net> wrote in message news:<41A18F8B.60CA52C5@nospam.net>...
    > From what I read before: the GSM transmitter can force your phone to switch
    > if the tranmistter is getting congested. So, not only signal level controls
    > it, but also how many users are registered on a certain transmitter.
    >
    > Also, some users may never see switching because their phones don't support
    > the necessary frequencies for both Rogers & Fido...
    >
    >
    >
    > repatch wrote:
    >
    > > Umm, that's the point. In the past you didn't have access to Fido's
    > > network, so for all intents and purposes Fido's network didn't exist. Now
    > > you do, so all of a sudden you have more signals available to you,
    > > switching is an obvious side effect of this.
    > >
    > > On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 11:59:38 -0500, Testy wrote:
    > >
    > > > Well, no switching has taken place since the day after the take over. I
    > > > figure it was just the NEW DOG peeing on the tree to establish his
    > > > territory.
    > > >
    > > > Testy
    > > >
    > > > "repatch" <repatch42@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:pan.2004.11.11.19.31.44.221963@yahoo.com...
    > > >> On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 13:12:14 -0500, Testy wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >>> Doesn't explain why the network changes when I am in exactly the same
    > > >>> position.
    > > >>
    > > >> With radio signals something like a car passing in front of your house
    > > >> can cause one signal to be stronger then the other. It's the nature of
    > > >> radio. TTYL
    > > >>
    > > >>
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