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HydraLux-4 is First Liquid Cooled LED Lightbulb

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July 16, 2009 11:58:21 PM

Really cool. I'll buy them when they're a bit cheaper.
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July 17, 2009 12:02:58 AM

Neat! I hope to more of these in future!
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July 17, 2009 12:14:53 AM

What we really should care is the comparison to a CFL. Accroding to Wikipedia, CFLs use 1/3rd to 1/5th of the energy of comparable incandescent bulbs, so we are roughly speaking 6-8 watts CFL is comparable to a 4W LED light bulb. Not so impressive, but still an improvement. At least until we get to the sticker shock. Since I've been using CFLs at home exclusively for years, it doesn't make much sense to upgrade to LED. Perhaps in a few years when the long lived CFLs start to die, or perhaps a decade until I run out of the spares I already have as well...
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July 17, 2009 12:15:11 AM

In general i think they should at least be shaped like the bulbs they are replacing. Many people are so use to what a A19(normal bulb) looks like that they do not tend to like these new ones.

It will be nice to see a 25 watt equiv though. 40 is just too much in my fan.
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July 17, 2009 12:17:03 AM

Correction: 5-8W CFL equals 4W LED. Sorry for the typo in my previous post.
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July 17, 2009 1:16:15 AM

I would get a couple if the prices came down. The one thing that annoys me about CFLs is that it takes a few seconds (sometimes more) to warm up (reach full brightness)... also no mercury is a plus
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July 17, 2009 1:30:50 AM

bk420Neat! I hope to "see" more of these in future!



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July 17, 2009 1:53:13 AM

well it's less than i figured it would be (i figured close to/over $50) and an led light would last for one heck of a long time, but i never figured an led light would get hot enough to use liquid cooling
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July 17, 2009 3:22:52 AM

Unfortunately all of the LED lights are low wattage, if they can give me something equivalent to a 40 or 60 watt incandescent then it will be useful, but a 25 watt incandescent just isnt enough to light a room.
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July 17, 2009 3:45:29 AM

Cool. :3 I wouldnt mind replacing all my bulbs once they start costing 10-15 bucks a pop.
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July 17, 2009 4:00:19 AM

Damn, I'm picking these up soon. I hope I can get them in volume packages, maybe 100$ for 4. Then I could save 521$ a year. Very cool.
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July 17, 2009 4:06:02 AM

hunter315Unfortunately all of the LED lights are low wattage, if they can give me something equivalent to a 40 or 60 watt incandescent then it will be useful, but a 25 watt incandescent just isnt enough to light a room.


read the article.

Eternaleds plans to announce 8W, 12W and 16W versions of the HydraLux by the end of 2009.
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July 17, 2009 4:53:12 AM

hunter315Unfortunately all of the LED lights are low wattage, if they can give me something equivalent to a 40 or 60 watt incandescent then it will be useful, but a 25 watt incandescent just isnt enough to light a room.


@hunter35:
GeoBulb® LED Light Bulb (Cool White)
"It puts out more light than a standard 60-watt bulb but uses less than 8 watts. LED bulbs last 3 years of continuous use or 10 years at about 8 hours per day."
Sounds good to you?..;)

It is cool if I have extra $99.95 to spend on a light bulb....>_<

http://www.ccrane.com/lights/led-light-bulbs/geobulb-le...

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July 17, 2009 5:00:07 AM

hmm.... something off topic... something funny...
I can't make any post or reply (while login and can + or - posts..) with either IE8 or firefox.. only my Safari 4 works...
hmm.... not sure what happen.... must not be kind of Apple-TH things...lol.....
It must be some kind of setting problem...
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July 17, 2009 10:26:33 AM

i don't have a thing for high power/cooled LEDs, they are supposed to be efficient like the low power LEDs commonly used.
will wait for OLEDs for household lighting.
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Anonymous
July 17, 2009 12:35:37 PM

Philips has the Master LED lights, but they are only available in Europe as they using 230 volts. First saw these online sometime last year.
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July 17, 2009 1:10:48 PM

Nice, but still missing replacement for my 50W Hallogen MR20 flood bulb. These get extremely hot and being receded, it kind hitch me with the risk of fire. LED lightning would greatly reduce dissipated heat AND save me lots of cash (15x50 = 750W).
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July 17, 2009 2:11:23 PM

I haven't noticed that any LED needed cooling. Perhaps some high wattage industrial app but you don't see cooled LEDs at homedepot and such. 4 watts can't possibly burn down your desktop lamp right?
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July 17, 2009 3:11:55 PM

It may be the transformer that step the power down, but even then, i find it hard to see that much heat. Since everyone is doing it, there is a reason, or they are just trying to make it look better like some motherboards have cooling that is not needed at all.
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Anonymous
July 17, 2009 4:22:34 PM

I've seen the website pictures, and it's clear that the daylight white (the first bright white on the video) is about equal to a 25W lightbulb.
The 'Warm White' gives off considerably less light, and is more comparable to a 20W lightbulb.
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July 17, 2009 5:50:20 PM

"it's clear that the daylight white..."

Yes, it's one of the things I don't care about "white" LED lighting. Fine for flashlights, but awfully "cold" for work, and even worse for most "home" environments. I'd rather have a "warmer" 20W-equivalent bulb than a "colder" 25W-equivalent bulb.

I'm surprised that refrigerator manufacturers haven't jumped on the LED bandwagon. Imagine having lighting on EACH level in a fridge, lighting the back as well as the front, lighting in the vegetable bins, etc. And all for less than the 25 - 50 watts normally consumed by the incandescents usually used. (I've replace the incandescents with tiny CFLs in mine - more light, more efficient - less power used & less heat generated.)

Still, the long-life and no mercury surely beats the twisty-tube CFLs. I also agree that they need to re-design the product so it fits the same space as a standard incandescent bulb.
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July 17, 2009 6:09:55 PM

The key thing is longevity. That was promised by CFLs but not delivered as far as I'm concerned. I'm always replacing the damn things. Not to mention you can't just throw 'em in the trash because of the mercury.

These expensive bulbs are only useful for applications where they are on all the time. I mean 8 hours of run time per day? During the summer most of our bulbs are hardly on at all except a few hours at night. Daily usage is important as it moves out the break-even point.

Not to mention that the break even point lies so far away that by the time you're half way there there's probably a cheaper alternative available. Sort of the same reason we shouldn't both building star ships now. They will be 10% of the way there when they get passed by a faster ship launched 40 years later :) 
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July 17, 2009 6:36:03 PM

25W I'll get interrested when they get to 150W.
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July 17, 2009 7:05:54 PM

The big question I have is are they dim-able? Most LED replacement lights are not dimmable, and when they are they're very expensive. Hoverer most CCFL are not dimmable either.
As for the cooling a >2W LED need some form of heat sink as the chips are very small like 1mm^2 and most of the 4W is heat(~3W) not light(1W). A good LED is ~25% efficient (usable light per Watt) Not much different then PC chips needing heat sinks, except that the LED chip has much smaller surface area to dissipate the heat. The voltage transformer/regulator is also another likely suspect for heat as LED use 1.2VDC - 3VDC for normal operation. LED are current controlled devices, after all they are nothing but a special type of diode.
The main cost effectiveness of LED bulb is the lifetime, and not needing to replace them often. Very important if the light fixture is hard to reach, like a convention hall, lobby, or conference room ceiling.
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July 17, 2009 11:38:19 PM

This would be a great alternative to compact florescent. We need to stop compact florescent because they all contain mercury and our water tables will be trashed in 50 years or so from them being thrown out. If the environmental whacos want to do something real, get on the mercury containing compact florescent band wagon.
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July 18, 2009 11:55:36 PM

NocturnalOneThe key thing is longevity. That was promised by CFLs but not delivered as far as I'm concerned. I'm always replacing the damn things. Not to mention you can't just throw 'em in the trash because of the mercury.These expensive bulbs are only useful for applications where they are on all the time. I mean 8 hours of run time per day? During the summer most of our bulbs are hardly on at all except a few hours at night. Daily usage is important as it moves out the break-even point.Not to mention that the break even point lies so far away that by the time you're half way there there's probably a cheaper alternative available. Sort of the same reason we shouldn't both building star ships now. They will be 10% of the way there when they get passed by a faster ship launched 40 years later

No CFL bulb I've ever owned(for myself anyway) lasted less than at least 2& a half years. Buy from a better manufacture.
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Anonymous
July 19, 2009 6:11:27 AM

R u kidding me 34 dollars for a bulb that only save me a little money. And its not like I only need ONE. Cool idea but come on the price is crazy. Not to mention I have not had a CFL last anywhere near what they claim, and your not suppose to just throw them away, and don't even mention the environmental hazard a broken CFL presents. Regular light bulbs are clean safe and cheap. If its not broke why spend 34 or 7 dollars on some fancy ugly looking and ugly light casting device.
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July 19, 2009 4:49:55 PM

annonR u kidding me 34 dollars for a bulb that only save me a little money. And its not like I only need ONE. Cool idea but come on the price is crazy. Not to mention I have not had a CFL last anywhere near what they claim, and your not suppose to just throw them away, and don't even mention the environmental hazard a broken CFL presents. Regular light bulbs are clean safe and cheap. If its not broke why spend 34 or 7 dollars on some fancy ugly looking and ugly light casting device.


Um.. Because, as the article clearly stated, it would save, after all expenses, $157 over it's "projected" lifetime. Per bulb. Thats less money out of your pocket, and less energy the plants have to make. And considering most of the energy they make never even reaches the end user anyway (due to "copper loss", transformers, etc) the end result the bulbs can have is many times larger than just what YOU see in your wallet. True, they are very expensive, and as such not everyone can/will jump on the wagon... but the positive effect that they CAN have can't be denied..
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July 20, 2009 2:35:19 AM

Don't forget...

-The more elctricity you and all others save, the more the energy companies will charge for their electricty.
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July 20, 2009 4:09:49 PM

joseph85No CFL bulb I've ever owned(for myself anyway) lasted less than at least 2& a half years. Buy from a better manufacture.


Are you saying 2 1/2 years of life from a fluorescent is better than the average life of incandescent bulbs? I have replaced maybe 15 to 20% of the incandescent bulbs in my house, and I moved in over eight years ago. For all the incandescent bulbs I replaced, I used fluorescent ones. I have had to replace most of those fluorescents, some of them twice. In my experience, incandescents last far longer than fluorescents.
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July 20, 2009 4:14:01 PM

MillemanDon't forget...-The more elctricity you and all others save, the more the energy companies will charge for their electricty.

Not necessarily. Though the cost of maintenance for the distribution network doesn't decrease, the power plants that use fuel to produce electricity use less fuel when the demand goes down (or don't increase their use of fuel as fast when the demand doesn't rise as sharply) and that may offset a good deal of the reduction in income from reduced demand.
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