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Questions about RAID & Network Drive Performance

Last response: in Windows XP
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Anonymous
June 4, 2005 7:30:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

I have 2 hard disks 250gb & 120gb in the same box, wondering if I need to
keep o/s to use the 120gb hd to store data?

Also, how do I boost the network drive disk performance for read & write?
How can I dedicate a separate partition for SWAP partition like in linux?

Thanks.
June 5, 2005 4:33:12 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

You mention Raid in subject line, so where does this impact on the info
supplied?
Your first two lines make little sense

The swap/paging file can be located on any disk on your sys
Though I doubt it would make much difference, assuming you have a reasonable
amount of mem.


"treehh" <treehh@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:5547976E-3F8A-4B17-8F66-9623436BEB50@microsoft.com...
> I have 2 hard disks 250gb & 120gb in the same box, wondering if I need to
> keep o/s to use the 120gb hd to store data?
>
> Also, how do I boost the network drive disk performance for read & write?
> How can I dedicate a separate partition for SWAP partition like in linux?
>
> Thanks.
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 7:30:29 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

treehh <treehh@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>I have 2 hard disks 250gb & 120gb in the same box, wondering if I need to
>keep o/s to use the 120gb hd to store data?
>
>Also, how do I boost the network drive disk performance for read & write?
>How can I dedicate a separate partition for SWAP partition like in linux?
>
>Thanks.

First of all forget everything you ever learned about SWAP files in
Linux, at least as far as Windows is concerned. The function and
usage is totally different.

Windows XP supports multiple paging files, one on each physical drive,
and configuring these will result in optimal performance as Windows
will use whichever paging file is most efficient for any given paging
operation.

The really optimal configuration for Windows XP paging files is to
have sufficient RAM so as to eliminate the need to move active memory
content from RAM to the paging file so as to allow that RAM to be used
for other, currently more important, functions.

A dedicated paging file partition on the same physical drive as the
operating system, application program, and/or data file partition is
counter-productive in Windows XP as this configuration tends to
maximimze the travel distance for the drive head mechanism, which has
an adverse effect on performance. The theoretical ideal physical
location for the paging file is immediately adjacent to whatever other
disk data is being processed at the same time as the paging operation,
such as when launching a new application program and simultaneously
paging out less active memory content so as to free up the needed RAM.

As for network drive performance, that is a function of both the speed
of the computer that the network drive is installed in, and also the
connection speed of the network. You would be surprised how often I
discover networks where the cabling is Cat5e 100 mbps but a number of
network adapters and sometimes even hubs or routers are older 10 mbps
items.

Good luck


Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
--
Microsoft MVP
On-Line Help Computer Service
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
http://aumha.org/alex.htm
!