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Best way to backup files on CD-R or CD-RW?

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Anonymous
June 9, 2005 12:36:51 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

First off, I’d like to say hello as I am new here :D  .

Currently I have all, what I consider essential, files backed up on
CDRW (DOCs, XCLs, PDFs, JPGs etc.). Files such as DOCs and XCLs I’ve
been having to erase the CDRW in order to replace them with the newer
version. There has to be a better way, can’t those files be
overwritten, like back in the 3.5" days? I searched on this site as
well as a couple of others to see if anyone had this dilema before, I
didn’t find but one. The suggestion was to use CD-R (being cheap &
all), create multisessions on them and go from there. First of all, I
don’t recall CD-Rs being that cheap and secondly I have no clue to
what is meant by multisession or how it would work. I have a hard time
believing in this day and age a file cant be overwritten on a CD?

Please can someone help me with this. I know my way around my PC, but
this has me stumped (sadly enough).

Thank you all in advance[/b]

--
Posted using the http://www.windowsforumz.com interface, at author's request
Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
Topic URL: http://www.windowsforumz.com/Help---Support-backup-file...
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More about : backup files

Anonymous
June 9, 2005 12:36:54 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

"RUMPLE" wrote:
> First off, I'd like to say hello as I am new here :D  .
>
> Currently I have all, what I consider essential, files backed
> up on CDRW (DOCs, XCLs, PDFs, JPGs etc.). Files such as DOCs
> and XCLs I've been having to erase the CDRW in order to
> replace them with the newer version. There has to be a better
> way, can't those files be overwritten, like back in the 3.5"
> days? I searched on this site as well as a couple of others to
> see if anyone had this dilema before, I didn't find but one.
> The suggestion was to use CD-R (being cheap & all), create
> multisessions on them and go from there. First of all, I don't
> recall CD-Rs being that cheap and secondly I have no clue to
> what is meant by multisession or how it would work. I have a
> hard time believing in this day and age a file cant be
> overwritten on a CD?
>
> Please can someone help me with this. I know my way around my
> PC, but this has me stumped (sadly enough).
>
> Thank you all in advance[/b]

You can’t just overwrite files on a cd, if you’re using a cd-rw you’ll
need to erase the whole thing and burn your backup again. If it’s a
cd-r you can multi-session, basicly you’ll be just adding on to the
disc untill it fills up. Meaning that your old files will still be on
the disc, however if you want to update your backup again the new
files will be burned along side of the old ones. The old backup’s
still going to be on there along with the new one.

If all you have to backup is text documents and pictures, i suggest
you just get a usb drive. It works like a secondary hard drive, and
depending on how much space you need/want on it, they range from 64
megs up to 2gigs. I got my 512 meg drive on ebay for $28 and couldn’t
be happier. Less clunky than a floppy with much more storage available
with it.
Anonymous
June 9, 2005 3:16:04 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

I'm familiar with what you want, I've been using CDRWs that way for
years, but you need a Third-party application to do it, and I know of
only two:
Nero Burning ROM and Roxio Easy CD Creator. In Nero the utility you
want is called "InCD", in Roxio it's "DirectCD" and each of them format
a CDRW for packet writing.

A very rough and basic idea of how it works is that with a "normal" cd,
whether it's R or RW, the data is written essentially in one continuous
string from start to finish, which is why you can't erase/edit little
bits and pieces of it -- it's all or nothing. However, the utilities I
mentioned write the data in seperate small units, called "packets", and
these small packets of data can be edited, moved to a different folder
on the disc, deleted, added to at will. In short, the cd can be treated
like a big ol' floppy :-)

I hope this helps.


--
~Ron

"illegitimatum non carborundum"
- w.c. fields

RUMPLE <UseLinkToEmail@WindowsForumz.com> wrote:
> First off, I'd like to say hello as I am new here :D  .
>
> Currently I have all, what I consider essential, files backed up on
> CDRW (DOCs, XCLs, PDFs, JPGs etc.). Files such as DOCs and XCLs I've
> been having to erase the CDRW in order to replace them with the newer
> version. There has to be a better way, can't those files be
> overwritten, like back in the 3.5" days? I searched on this site as
> well as a couple of others to see if anyone had this dilema before, I
> didn't find but one. The suggestion was to use CD-R (being cheap &
> all), create multisessions on them and go from there. First of all, I
> don't recall CD-Rs being that cheap and secondly I have no clue to
> what is meant by multisession or how it would work. I have a hard time
> believing in this day and age a file cant be overwritten on a CD?
>
> Please can someone help me with this. I know my way around my PC, but
> this has me stumped (sadly enough).
>
> Thank you all in advance[/b]
Related resources
June 9, 2005 8:42:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

A simple & fairly cheap solution may be a memory stick, as the files you
want to store would be relatively small, but large in capacity.
They just plug into a USB port & are completely editatable - a virtual
mini-drive.

--

johnf

> First off, I’d like to say hello as I am new here :D  .
>
> Currently I have all, what I consider essential, files backed up on
> CDRW (DOCs, XCLs, PDFs, JPGs etc.). Files such as DOCs and XCLs I’ve
> been having to erase the CDRW in order to replace them with the newer
> version. There has to be a better way, can’t those files be
> overwritten, like back in the 3.5" days? I searched on this site as
> well as a couple of others to see if anyone had this dilema before, I
> didn’t find but one. The suggestion was to use CD-R (being cheap &
> all), create multisessions on them and go from there. First of all, I
> don’t recall CD-Rs being that cheap and secondly I have no clue to
> what is meant by multisession or how it would work. I have a hard time
> believing in this day and age a file cant be overwritten on a CD?
>
> Please can someone help me with this. I know my way around my PC, but
> this has me stumped (sadly enough).
>
> Thank you all in advance[/b]
>
> --
> Posted using the http://www.windowsforumz.com interface, at author's
> request Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet
> standards Topic URL:
> http://www.windowsforumz.com/Help---Support-backup-file...
> Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse:
> http://www.windowsforumz.com/eform.php?p=1715487
Anonymous
June 9, 2005 8:42:52 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

I agree memory sticks are a good solution, I use several myself. We're
talking portable devices (a memory chip in a housing of some sort) that
when plugged into a USB port becomes virtually a hard drive, and the
whole unit could be carried on a keychain should you desire -- although
I doubt it's wise to subject them to the stresses of keychain life :-)

One place to see a range of them from a few Mb to a gigabyte or more is
www.tigerdirect.com [not an advertisement, just a tip about a
resource], and someone else in this thread mentioned ebay.
Memory sticks (aka "mini drives" or "portable storage" in some catalogs)
are readily available, and on a capacity-for-the-buck basis are as cheap
or cheaper than cds. -- Plus your system treats them as simply an
additional hard drive :-)
--
~Ron

"illegitimatum non carborundum"
- w.c. fields

johnf <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote:
> A simple & fairly cheap solution may be a memory stick, as the files
> you want to store would be relatively small, but large in capacity.
> They just plug into a USB port & are completely editatable - a virtual
> mini-drive.
>
>
>> First off, I'd like to say hello as I am new here :D  .
>>
>> Currently I have all, what I consider essential, files backed up on
>> CDRW (DOCs, XCLs, PDFs, JPGs etc.). Files such as DOCs and XCLs I've
>> been having to erase the CDRW in order to replace them with the newer
>> version. There has to be a better way, can't those files be
>> overwritten, like back in the 3.5" days? I searched on this site as
>> well as a couple of others to see if anyone had this dilema before, I
>> didn't find but one. The suggestion was to use CD-R (being cheap &
>> all), create multisessions on them and go from there. First of all, I
>> don't recall CD-Rs being that cheap and secondly I have no clue to
>> what is meant by multisession or how it would work. I have a hard
>> time believing in this day and age a file cant be overwritten on a
>> CD?
>>
>> Please can someone help me with this. I know my way around my PC, but
>> this has me stumped (sadly enough).
>>
>> Thank you all in advance[/b]
>>
>> --
>> Posted using the http://www.windowsforumz.com interface, at author's
>> request Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet
>> standards Topic URL:
>>
http://www.windowsforumz.com/Help---Support-backup-file...
>> Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse:
>> http://www.windowsforumz.com/eform.php?p=1715487
June 9, 2005 10:18:43 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

Sorry, should read memory sticks are large in capacity.

--

johnf

>A simple & fairly cheap solution may be a memory stick, as the files you
> want to store would be relatively small, but large in capacity.
> They just plug into a USB port & are completely editatable - a virtual
> mini-drive.
>
> --
>
> johnf
>
>> First off, I’d like to say hello as I am new here :D  .
>>
>> Currently I have all, what I consider essential, files backed up on
>> CDRW (DOCs, XCLs, PDFs, JPGs etc.). Files such as DOCs and XCLs I’ve
>> been having to erase the CDRW in order to replace them with the newer
>> version. There has to be a better way, can’t those files be
>> overwritten, like back in the 3.5" days? I searched on this site as
>> well as a couple of others to see if anyone had this dilema before, I
>> didn’t find but one. The suggestion was to use CD-R (being cheap &
>> all), create multisessions on them and go from there. First of all, I
>> don’t recall CD-Rs being that cheap and secondly I have no clue to
>> what is meant by multisession or how it would work. I have a hard time
>> believing in this day and age a file cant be overwritten on a CD?
>>
>> Please can someone help me with this. I know my way around my PC, but
>> this has me stumped (sadly enough).
>>
>> Thank you all in advance[/b]
>>
>> --
>> Posted using the http://www.windowsforumz.com interface, at author's
>> request Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet
>> standards Topic URL:
>> http://www.windowsforumz.com/Help---Support-backup-file...
>> Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse:
>> http://www.windowsforumz.com/eform.php?p=1715487
Anonymous
June 10, 2005 4:35:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

"rcavinspam" wrote:
> I'm familiar with what you want, I've been using CDRWs that
> way for
> years, but you need a Third-party application to do it, and I
> know of
> only two:
> Nero Burning ROM and Roxio Easy CD Creator. In Nero the
> utility you
> want is called "InCD", in Roxio it's "DirectCD" and each of
> them format
> a CDRW for packet writing.
>
> A very rough and basic idea of how it works is that with a
> "normal" cd,
> whether it's R or RW, the data is written essentially in one
> continuous
> string from start to finish, which is why you can't erase/edit
> little
> bits and pieces of it -- it's all or nothing. However, the
> utilities I
> mentioned write the data in seperate small units, called
> "packets", and
> these small packets of data can be edited, moved to a
> different folder
> on the disc, deleted, added to at will. In short, the cd can
> be treated
> like a big ol' floppy :-)
>
> I hope this helps.
>
>
> --
> ~Ron
>
> "illegitimatum non carborundum"
> - w.c. fields
>
> RUMPLE <UseLinkToEmail@WindowsForumz.com> wrote:
> > First off, I'd like to say hello as I am new here :D  .
> >
> > Currently I have all, what I consider essential, files
> backed up on
> > CDRW (DOCs, XCLs, PDFs, JPGs etc.). Files such as DOCs and
> XCLs I've
> > been having to erase the CDRW in order to replace them with
> the newer
> > version. There has to be a better way, can't those files be
> > overwritten, like back in the 3.5" days? I searched on this
> site as
> > well as a couple of others to see if anyone had this dilema
> before, I
> > didn't find but one. The suggestion was to use CD-R (being
> cheap &
> > all), create multisessions on them and go from there. First
> of all, I
> > don't recall CD-Rs being that cheap and secondly I have no
> clue to
> > what is meant by multisession or how it would work. I have a
> hard time
> > believing in this day and age a file cant be overwritten on
> a CD?
> >
> > Please can someone help me with this. I know my way around
> my PC, but
> > this has me stumped (sadly enough).
> >
> > Thank you all in advance[/b]

I gotta tell you all, a USB memory stick sounds like the ultimate
solution. But I’m in no financial situation to do that method. So I
must say, rcavinspam, you rock. That sounds like exactly what I’m
trying to accomplish. Are there any drawbacks to doing that (less
intergrity on the disks, etc.)? As soon as I’m financially able a
memory stick sounds good.

Thank you all for your suggestions :D  :)  :D  :)  :D  :) 

--
Posted using the http://www.windowsforumz.com interface, at author's request
Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
Topic URL: http://www.windowsforumz.com/Help---Support-backup-file...
Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.windowsforumz.com/eform.php?p=1716773
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 6:36:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

"rcavinspam" wrote:
> I agree memory sticks are a good solution, I use several
> myself. We're
> talking portable devices (a memory chip in a housing of some
> sort) that
> when plugged into a USB port becomes virtually a hard drive,
> and the
> whole unit could be carried on a keychain should you desire --
> although
> I doubt it's wise to subject them to the stresses of keychain
> life :-)
>
> One place to see a range of them from a few Mb to a gigabyte
> or more is
> www.tigerdirect.com [not an advertisement, just a tip about a
> resource], and someone else in this thread mentioned ebay.
> Memory sticks (aka "mini drives" or "portable storage" in some
> catalogs)
> are readily available, and on a capacity-for-the-buck basis
> are as cheap
> or cheaper than cds. -- Plus your system treats them as
> simply an
> additional hard drive :-)
> --
> ~Ron
>
> "illegitimatum non carborundum"
> - w.c. fields
>
> johnf <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote:
> > A simple & fairly cheap solution may be a memory stick, as
> the files
> > you want to store would be relatively small, but large in
> capacity.
> > They just plug into a USB port & are completely editatable -
> a virtual
> > mini-drive.
> >
> >
>  >> First off, I'd like to say hello as I am new here :D 
> .
>  >>
>  >> Currently I have all, what I consider essential,
> files backed up on
>  >> CDRW (DOCs, XCLs, PDFs, JPGs etc.). Files such as
> DOCs and XCLs I've
>  >> been having to erase the CDRW in order to replace
> them with the newer
>  >> version. There has to be a better way, can't those
> files be
>  >> overwritten, like back in the 3.5" days? I searched
> on this site as
>  >> well as a couple of others to see if anyone had this
> dilema before, I
>  >> didn't find but one. The suggestion was to use CD-R
> (being cheap &
>  >> all), create multisessions on them and go from there.
> First of all, I
>  >> don't recall CD-Rs being that cheap and secondly I
> have no clue to
>  >> what is meant by multisession or how it would work. I
> have a hard
>  >> time believing in this day and age a file cant be
> overwritten on a
>  >> CD?
>  >>
>  >> Please can someone help me with this. I know my way
> around my PC, but
>  >> this has me stumped (sadly enough).
>  >>
>  >> Thank you all in advance[/b]
>  >>
>  >> --
>  >> Posted using the http://www.windowsforumz.com
> interface, at author's
>  >> request Articles individually checked for conformance
> to usenet
>  >> standards Topic URL:
>  >>
> http://www.windowsforumz.com/Help---Support-backup-file...
>  >> Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd).
> Report abuse:
>  >> http://www.windowsforumz.com/eform.php?p=1715487

I was told "mini drives" are for temporary use only. Is this true?
In fact, someone told me if used for storage could have more chance of
failing, compared to a regular HD (not sure what that means)?

Any truth to any of this?


TY
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 6:37:46 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

>If it’s a cd-r you can multi-session, basicly you’ll be
>just adding on to the disc untill it fills up. Meaning that your old
>files will still be on the disc, however if you want to update your
>backup again the new files will be burned along side of the old ones.
>The old backup’s still going to be on there along with the new
>one.

Not sure if I did the multi-session CD-R correctly. I backed up
several objects (apps, addressbook) around 10 items I believe, then
wanted to add a folder. I thought it was just suppose to add the
folder making it 11 not 10 items, instead it overwrote the files that
were there. After running disk info within Nero, I saw it didn’t
overwrite the 10 files, it just put the new one on a seperate track.
So my question I guess is, are different tracks able to be viewed, and
if so, how?

I tried out the InCD utility from Nero, but I’m trying to see which
method would be better and reliable.

Thanks all, and please, give me a clue
:oops: 
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 6:28:52 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

RUMPLE <DoNotEmail@WindowsForumz.com> wrote:
> "rcavinspam" wrote:
> > I agree memory sticks are a good solution, I use several
> > myself. We're
> > talking portable devices (a memory chip in a housing of some
> > sort) that
> > when plugged into a USB port becomes virtually a hard drive,
> > and the
> > whole unit could be carried on a keychain should you desire --
> > although
> > I doubt it's wise to subject them to the stresses of keychain
> > life :-)
> >
> > One place to see a range of them from a few Mb to a gigabyte
> > or more is
> > www.tigerdirect.com [not an advertisement, just a tip about a
> > resource], and someone else in this thread mentioned ebay.
> > Memory sticks (aka "mini drives" or "portable storage" in some
> > catalogs)
> > are readily available, and on a capacity-for-the-buck basis
> > are as cheap
> > or cheaper than cds. -- Plus your system treats them as
> > simply an
> > additional hard drive :-)
> > --
> > ~Ron
> >
> > "illegitimatum non carborundum"
> > - w.c. fields
> >
> > johnf <john_f@bigpond.net.a> wrote:
> > > A simple & fairly cheap solution may be a memory stick, as
> > the files
> > > you want to store would be relatively small, but large in
> > capacity.
> > > They just plug into a USB port & are completely editatable -
> > a virtual
> > > mini-drive.
> > >
>
> I was told "mini drives" are for temporary use only. Is this true?
> In fact, someone told me if used for storage could have more chance of
> failing, compared to a regular HD (not sure what that means)?
>
> Any truth to any of this?
>
>
> TY

None that I've noticed. The use of the name "drives" for these gadgets
is somewhat misleading and probably stems from the fact that Windows
recognizes them as such and assigns a typical hard drive icon to them,
but they're not really drives in the mechanical sense. They're simply
a memory chip that has been provided with a means of easily connecting -
disconnecting from a pc (typically via usb port). No moving parts,
nothing to fail, in a sense it's RAM that doesn't clear itself when the
power is off (ie: disconnected from the pc), but you'll have to ask an
engineer how that's achieved.

Abuse could cause it to fail I suppose... if you get one don't toss it
in the same drawer with a collection of refrigerator magnets and you
should be ok ;-)
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 6:35:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

"RUMPLE" wrote:
>
Quote:
If it's a cd-r you can multi-session,
> basicly you'll be just adding on to the disc untill it fills
> up. Meaning that your old files will still be on the disc,
> however if you want to update your backup again the new files
> will be burned along side of the old ones. The old backup's
> still going to be on there along with the new
> one.

>
> Not sure if I did the multi-session CD-R correctly. I backed
> up several objects (apps, addressbook) around 10 items I
> believe, then wanted to add a folder. I thought it was just
> suppose to add the folder making it 11 not 10 items, instead
> it overwrote the files that were there. After running disk
> info within Nero, I saw it didn't overwrite the 10 files, it
> just put the new one on a seperate track. So my question I
> guess is, are different tracks able to be viewed, and if so,
> how?
>
> I tried out the InCD utility from Nero, but I'm trying to see
> which method would be better and reliable.
>
> Thanks all, and please, give me a clue
> :oops: 
>
> [/b]

Problem solved. Thank you everyone for the help. Ultimately I believe
a memory stick will be best, but for now it’s done.

Thanks everyone
!