Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Need help choosing which videocard is right for me

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
March 28, 2005 11:15:19 PM

According to this link...

http://www.jscustompcs.com/power_supply/Power_Supply_Ca...

I have a Pentium 4 Socket 478 400FSB Northwood Core (64W)
Two Pair Rambus RDRAM (20W)
One hard drive (25W)
DVD/CD-RW Combo Drive (30W)
USB Device (5W)
Planned nVidia GeForce 6800 (49W)

Now there's been alot of debate over the nature of the Dell PSU for 8200. Dell moderators etc have stated that they rate the PSUs conservatively and it's actually 300-350W. But some say that it's incorrect and the various articles that back that claim are false and leave other factors out such as voltage, amperage, etc.

I even called BFG to tell them about the situation and they said a flat-out no to my getting a 6800. So would a 6200 (I heard it's just a 5200FX with SM 3.0) be good?

More about : choosing videocard

a b U Graphics card
March 29, 2005 5:34:45 AM

I'd try it. If the power supply blows, I'd replace it :smile:

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
March 30, 2005 12:27:52 AM

They allow standard ATX but you'll need to mod the case...
Related resources
a b U Graphics card
March 30, 2005 4:43:12 AM

Dell's anally arranged ATX connector was a Pentium-PIII problem, with history: Dell had a smart AT power supply (that's right, AT) that used the ATX connector BEFORE ATX was widely available. So there wasn't the issue back then because the ATX plug was also the Dell proprietary Smart AT plug, but ATX wasn't an issue yet.

Later Dell added 3.3v to their power supply using a 6-pin flat connector (like the old AT connector). Unfortunately, at the time they did that there were also ATX power supplies using the same flat connector for auxiliary power (for server boards and riser cards). And that's when hell really broke loose with people getting the two mixed up!

Dell went to ATX12v power. I think one model remained proprietary, but it was completely proprietary (nonstandard connectors) so the good news is you can't get it mixed up.

Old AT power supplies usually had dual-plugs, an input and a passthrough for the monitor. The input was usually in above (high) the passthrough (low). Dell ATX 12v power supplies have the power plug in the "low" position and the "high" position is blocked off by the case. Most power supplies have the power plug in the "high" position, hence the comment about modifying the case to make a standard unit fit (cutting out the blocked-off portion).

There ARE standard power supplies with the power plug in the same position as a Dell, you just have to search for them and LOOK at PICTURES.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
a b U Graphics card
March 30, 2005 4:43:28 AM

There ARE standard power supplies with the power plug in the same position as a Dell, you just have to search for them and LOOK at PICTURES.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
March 31, 2005 1:52:13 AM

If the PSU blows it could surge the whole PC and cause other damage.

<font color=red><b>DCB</b></font color=red><font color=white><b>_</b></font color=white><font color=blue><b>AU</b></font color=blue>
a b U Graphics card
March 31, 2005 5:09:18 AM

I've never seen a surge hurt a system, only a spike. And a spike would be a much rarer event than a surge when it comes to blowing power supplies.

Those things they call surge protectors? They should actually call them spike protectors.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
April 1, 2005 2:40:07 AM

When I mean surge, I'am refering to a spike - increase in voltage over specifications and with higher voltages, overcurrent/high amperage is usually present.

Ie. depending on how the PSU transformer is wound(if not solidstate). If for example- there are few ways to wind the trans, but assuming- primary winding = input/supply and secondary winding has the tappings for the different voltages.

Therefore if primary winding blows across the secondary winding, full input/supply voltage can enter the MB, etc and blow the hell out of it, before the input/supply circuit breaker or fuse will switch off/isolate.

I've seen many electrical devices, especially electonic starters as a example, destroyed as a result of the way the supply transformer malfunctioned/burned out.

Sometimes the PSU can/will fail and do no other damage, but if you have doubts about quality or overloading, why risk it?

<font color=red><b>DCB</b></font color=red><font color=white><b>_</b></font color=white><font color=blue><b>AU</b></font color=blue>
a b U Graphics card
April 1, 2005 5:01:10 AM

I understand the sentiment "why risk it", I've just never SEEN it. That's because the parts that come AFTER the transformer are so delicate they tend to blow instantly when hit with a large spike.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
April 1, 2005 4:02:40 PM

There was a school here in my area that purchased a few computers a little while back. Slowly, each one came in with blown power supplies. Some would be ok by just replacing the PS, but most had blown CD-ROMs, floppies, and in some cases motherboards. After seeing that, I wouldn't take any chances either.

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
April 1, 2005 4:08:20 PM

I've seen a couple PSU's die in my time. One of them killed the mobo.

Cheap PSU's aren't worth buying.

________________
<b>Geforce <font color=red>6800 Ultra</b></font color=red>
<b>AthlonXP <font color=red>3200+</b></font color=red> <i>(Barton 2500+ o/c 400 FSB)</i>
<b>3dMark03: <font color=red>9,192</b>
a b U Graphics card
April 1, 2005 7:03:25 PM

For some people it's always just too tempting to save a few dollars on that PSU. That or get the case with PSU for $50. It's not worth the instability and pain in the arse. Think of how many times you've gone out and blown $40-100 on...whatever. Something that you don't even remember now -that PSU will be there a long time to come if you get a good one. You DO get what you pay for with PSUs...

__________________________________________________
<font color=red>You're a boil on the arse of progress - don't make me squeeze you!</font color=red>
!