Whats the fastest way to tranfer large files between two computers

I have just bought a laptop and have large files to tranfer. I have USB2 on the pc and have wifi. I have tranfered some over wifi but I am only getting 1.7-2 mbps. I would have thought much higher speeds were possible considering I am not downloading off the internet (I get faster speeds downloading)
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More about whats fastest tranfer large files computers
  1. cabled lan connection to router/switch.
  2. In order of fastest to slowest
    1). Remove the hard drive from the laptop and plug it into your desktop, this is the most dangerous as it runs the risk of you unintentionally wiping important files/folder from your laptop hard drive.
    2). Gigabit LAN connection, both ethernet cards and your switch/router must be running at gigabit speeds
    3). Transfer through USB2, this could be an external hard drive or flash drive.
    4). Fast Ethernet, any ethernet port running at 100Mb slows the whole connection.
  3. If you have gigabit on both machines and are prepared to configure the LAN connections yourself, then get a cross over cable and you can plug them together directly.
    The problem is that you then don't have anything like DHCP to set IP addresses etc, so this is where you have to set both machines NIC manually.
  4. Globularity,

    Had the same issue with same Wi-Fi speeds... read this at it solved my problem:

    http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-2349953/unidentified-network-internet-access-ethernet-basic-question.html#14459357

    Hey Pauls3743 and nigelren,

    Under the Gigabit LAN connection (router and LAN cards are Gigabit), how do you achieve more than 50 MB/sec (around 400 Mbps)?

    That is like 40% of the Gigabit capacity.. have been unable to transfer at higher rates.

    Any recommendations to get speeds, lets say, around 80-90 MB/sec (around 700 Mbps out of the 1,000 Gbps)?

    Thanks!!!
  5. You need the following in both computers.

    1). a hard drive capable of 100MB/s transfer speeds - for 7,200rpm 3.5" drives this came about once platter capacity reached 500GB per platter (most modern drives should be capable of this), laptop drives still struggle to reach this today.
    2). The pc needs to be powerful enough to support it, I have a HP laptop which locks up anytime I ask it to do large file transfers. There was a settings I changed in the network settings to alleviate the lock ups but it didn't stop the lockups and it hardly improved the transfer rate, I can't remember which setting just now.

    Things which can slow your file transfer down:
    1). a poor router/network switch. I use a dedicated business network switch at home, primarily because I have a lot of devices but also because I find the switch in my router locks up when I punish it too much. My router is merely my connection to the internet.
    2). small files. These cause a file transfer to slow right down as it causes extra overhead on the hard drives and the network. Network transfers work best when you're transferring large files as it less thrashing for the hard drive.
    3). Transferring using the OS drive. Anytime the OS accesses the hard drive it's not accessing the file transfer, this has the same effect as transferring small files because the hard drive has to go looking for the other files outside the file transfer.

    Lastly, a couple of notes.
    The file transfer window does not display the current file transfer rate, it merely shows the average transfer rate for the period the file transfer has been running to date. I would suggest watching the "Networking" tab on the Task Manager and/or Resource Monitor for a more accurate indication of the current transfer speed.
    When I'm doing large file transfers (without small files) I can max out the network connection and get 112MB/s (the full 1Gbs), but then I do have powerful machines and I mostly transfer between high capacity non-OS drives, it also helps that most of my machine have SSDs for the OS.
  6. pauls3743 said:
    You need the following in both computers.

    1). a hard drive capable of 100MB/s transfer speeds - for 7,200rpm 3.5" drives this came about once platter capacity reached 500GB per platter (most modern drives should be capable of this), laptop drives still struggle to reach this today.
    2). The pc needs to be powerful enough to support it, I have a HP laptop which locks up anytime I ask it to do large file transfers. There was a settings I changed in the network settings to alleviate the lock ups but it didn't stop the lockups and it hardly improved the transfer rate, I can't remember which setting just now.

    Things which can slow your file transfer down:
    1). a poor router/network switch. I use a dedicated business network switch at home, primarily because I have a lot of devices but also because I find the switch in my router locks up when I punish it too much. My router is merely my connection to the internet.
    2). small files. These cause a file transfer to slow right down as it causes extra overhead on the hard drives and the network. Network transfers work best when you're transferring large files as it less thrashing for the hard drive.
    3). Transferring using the OS drive. Anytime the OS accesses the hard drive it's not accessing the file transfer, this has the same effect as transferring small files because the hard drive has to go looking for the other files outside the file transfer.

    Lastly, a couple of notes.
    The file transfer window does not display the current file transfer rate, it merely shows the average transfer rate for the period the file transfer has been running to date. I would suggest watching the "Networking" tab on the Task Manager and/or Resource Monitor for a more accurate indication of the current transfer speed.
    When I'm doing large file transfers (without small files) I can max out the network connection and get 112MB/s (the full 1Gbs), but then I do have powerful machines and I mostly transfer between high capacity non-OS drives, it also helps that most of my machine have SSDs for the OS.


    Thanks for the replay although your last post was about a year ago :)

    Well I do have:

    1) two power computers. Laptop with 7,200 rpms nice processor, etc. It is an Asus G53JW with 8 GB ram and the new desktop with even a nicer processor also with 7,200 rpms hard disks... no SSID's though... too small for me (capacity) and too expensive still.. and don't really need the extra performance for what I do at home.. or work..

    2) the router I have is supposed to be one the best, though not new one.. I don't use it for anything as I got as a gift only, a Netgear WNDR3800... it's nice for what I use or do I guess..?

    3) small files.. well yes.. I noticed that for sure... larger chunks made me get speeds of 60-70 MB/sec but not constant...

    4) yes I was checking on the resource monitor all the time and it kind of matched the standard speed/rate transfer window...

    So well thanks for hints!! I think this helps a lot!!

    Nothing much I can do about it... happy with my 30-50 MB/sec :)
    too bad can't double it for now.. will make tests later on..
  7. holy resurrection Batman!
  8. leeb2013 said:
    holy resurrection Batman!


    I did notice and was tempted but thought better of it :p
  9. connect your laptop hdd to desktop via serial ata and copy
  10. by connecting so you can get trans fer rate upto 60mb/s
  11. Couple of month ago, I needed to clean install my Mac, so I had to transfer all my files from my Mac to PC as a backup. First I used USB drive, which was painfully slow (about 3MB/s) transfer rate. Then I came up with a solution of using an Ethernet cable, and I couldn't be happier! I got over 130MB/s of transfer rate! I could easily transfer 1GB of file in less than 10 seconds.

    Here's a complete guide to setup Ethernet cable: http://www.tufitech.com/how-to/fastest-way-to-transfer-files-from-pc-to-pc/

    Trust me, it's reliable, and blazing fast!
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