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Wireless LAN sharing dialup Internet connection

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Anonymous
April 20, 2004 12:31:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I live in the middle of nowhere... well, not really, but DSL, Cable,
and WISPs are all still a way off, so dialup's what we have in our
area.

I was given a Linksys BEFW11S4 Wireless Router a while back, and I
have a Wireless card for my notebook, so I thought I would give it a
shot. I'm doing it now, so I can tell you it's possible!

Here's how I did it using the Linksys and WinXP Internet Connection
Sharing.

1. First, on the computer that dials out to the Internet (I'll call
this PC1), install a 100Mbps LAN card. After setting up the card
(Automatic IP or static is fine for now), run the Network Setup wizard
to allow other computers to connect to the Internet through "this
computer." After the wizard runs, it will assign the IP address of
192.168.0.1 to your LAN card.

2. Now dial out to the internet. Once you are connected, open a
commmand prompt and type "ipconfig /all" You should get one result
for your LAN card and another for the dialup connection. Make note of
your two DNS servers, they'll come into play later.

3. Next, connect the wireless router up. Plug a CAT5 patch cable from
the LAN card in PC1 to the "Internet" port on the router.

4. Now, from a DIFFERENT computer (PC2), you need to connect to the
wireless router. I did it by booting my laptop and letting the
wireless NIC automatically detect a Wireless network. After the
wireless connection is confirmed, go to a command prompt on PC2 and do
an "ipconfig /all" Your wireless connection will probably be assigned
an address like 192.168.1.100. If not, you may need to press and hold
the router's "reset" button for about 5-10 seconds and redo this Step
4 process.

5. Now, once you have a 192.168.1.something address on PC2, open your
web browser software and type http://192.168.1.1 and press Enter.

6. You will be prompted for a username and password. Skip the
username and type in the default router password "admin". You'll
probably want to change that later for security.

7. You should be looking at a "Linksys Setup" page. The SSID will be
"Linksys" and WEP will be disabled. You'll probably want to change
that later for security, too. NOT NOW!!!

8. Make sure the "Internet connection type" is set to "Obtain an IP
automatically". PC1 will give this router its necessary data.

9. Click on the "Status" tab at the top. You should see something
like this:
LAN: (MAC Address: 00-00-00-00-00-00)
IP Address: 192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
DHCP server: Enabled


Internet: (MAC Address: 00-00-00-00-00-00)
IP Address: 192.168.0.100
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
and so on...

If your internet settings aren't filled in, PC1 isn't configured
properly for Connection Sharing OR you don't have a standard patch
cable connected OR PC1's LAN card is misconfigured.

10. Click on the "DHCP" tab. Find the DNS server addresses you wrote
down in step 2. Make the first one DNS 1, and the second DNS 2. I
put the IP of PC1 into DNS 3 and WINS, but that's so I can tinker with
an in-house testbed Linux/Apache server I have, so you probably don't
need those... feel free. Click "Apply" and wait until the screen
comes back.

11. Go back to the "Status" tab. Click "DHCP Release" and then "DHCP
Renew". Your new DNS entries should show up.

12. Open a new browser window on PC2 and go to a favorite web site.
You should be on the web!

12a. If this fails, check to see if you are running McAfee Firewall.
If so, disable it and try step 12 again. McAfee Firewall can't share
connections through a router due to its inability to detect the other
computers' names. I haven't tried other Firewall softwares for
compatibility. Remember, XP has one built in, but I can't vouch for
it's capabilities or performance.

13. If this process stops working in a few days, weeks, or months, go
back to PC1 and do an IPCONFIG /all again. If your ISP ever changes
their DNS settings, you'll have to redo steps 10-12.

Once I got this working, I connected a patch cable from my RedHat
Linux server to port 1 on the back of the Linksys, made sure the NIC
in the Linux box was configured for DHCP, and rebooted the server.
Viola! The server's on the web now too.

Next step, the kids' PC!

Hope this helps somebody else out! Best of luck!
Anonymous
April 20, 2004 8:45:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

steventhomas42@yahoo.com (Steve Thomas) wrote in
news:811942d0.0404191931.52dcf5b0@posting.google.com:

> I live in the middle of nowhere... well, not really, but DSL, Cable,
> and WISPs are all still a way off, so dialup's what we have in our
> area.
>
> I was given a Linksys BEFW11S4 Wireless Router a while back, and I
> have a Wireless card for my notebook, so I thought I would give it a
> shot. I'm doing it now, so I can tell you it's possible!
>
> Here's how I did it using the Linksys and WinXP Internet Connection
> Sharing.
>
> 1. First, on the computer that dials out to the Internet (I'll call
> this PC1), install a 100Mbps LAN card. After setting up the card
> (Automatic IP or static is fine for now), run the Network Setup wizard
> to allow other computers to connect to the Internet through "this
> computer." After the wizard runs, it will assign the IP address of
> 192.168.0.1 to your LAN card.
>
> 2. Now dial out to the internet. Once you are connected, open a
> commmand prompt and type "ipconfig /all" You should get one result
> for your LAN card and another for the dialup connection. Make note of
> your two DNS servers, they'll come into play later.
>
> 3. Next, connect the wireless router up. Plug a CAT5 patch cable from
> the LAN card in PC1 to the "Internet" port on the router.
>
> 4. Now, from a DIFFERENT computer (PC2), you need to connect to the
> wireless router. I did it by booting my laptop and letting the
> wireless NIC automatically detect a Wireless network. After the
> wireless connection is confirmed, go to a command prompt on PC2 and do
> an "ipconfig /all" Your wireless connection will probably be assigned
> an address like 192.168.1.100. If not, you may need to press and hold
> the router's "reset" button for about 5-10 seconds and redo this Step
> 4 process.
>
> 5. Now, once you have a 192.168.1.something address on PC2, open your
> web browser software and type http://192.168.1.1 and press Enter.
>
> 6. You will be prompted for a username and password. Skip the
> username and type in the default router password "admin". You'll
> probably want to change that later for security.
>
> 7. You should be looking at a "Linksys Setup" page. The SSID will be
> "Linksys" and WEP will be disabled. You'll probably want to change
> that later for security, too. NOT NOW!!!
>
> 8. Make sure the "Internet connection type" is set to "Obtain an IP
> automatically". PC1 will give this router its necessary data.
>
> 9. Click on the "Status" tab at the top. You should see something
> like this:
> LAN: (MAC Address: 00-00-00-00-00-00)
> IP Address: 192.168.1.1
> Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
> DHCP server: Enabled
>
>
> Internet: (MAC Address: 00-00-00-00-00-00)
> IP Address: 192.168.0.100
> Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
> Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
> and so on...
>
> If your internet settings aren't filled in, PC1 isn't configured
> properly for Connection Sharing OR you don't have a standard patch
> cable connected OR PC1's LAN card is misconfigured.
>
> 10. Click on the "DHCP" tab. Find the DNS server addresses you wrote
> down in step 2. Make the first one DNS 1, and the second DNS 2. I
> put the IP of PC1 into DNS 3 and WINS, but that's so I can tinker with
> an in-house testbed Linux/Apache server I have, so you probably don't
> need those... feel free. Click "Apply" and wait until the screen
> comes back.
>
> 11. Go back to the "Status" tab. Click "DHCP Release" and then "DHCP
> Renew". Your new DNS entries should show up.
>
> 12. Open a new browser window on PC2 and go to a favorite web site.
> You should be on the web!
>
> 12a. If this fails, check to see if you are running McAfee Firewall.
> If so, disable it and try step 12 again. McAfee Firewall can't share
> connections through a router due to its inability to detect the other
> computers' names. I haven't tried other Firewall softwares for
> compatibility. Remember, XP has one built in, but I can't vouch for
> it's capabilities or performance.
>
> 13. If this process stops working in a few days, weeks, or months, go
> back to PC1 and do an IPCONFIG /all again. If your ISP ever changes
> their DNS settings, you'll have to redo steps 10-12.
>
> Once I got this working, I connected a patch cable from my RedHat
> Linux server to port 1 on the back of the Linksys, made sure the NIC
> in the Linux box was configured for DHCP, and rebooted the server.
> Viola! The server's on the web now too.
>
> Next step, the kids' PC!
>
> Hope this helps somebody else out! Best of luck!
>

This is not meant as a putdown as you obviously did a fine job. But why
would you not use a cheap dial-up router with an rs232 connected to the
modem as the gateway device for the LAN and WAN? Then you could have the
wireless Linksys plugged into the dial-up router acting as a WAP.

To have a Windows O/S connected directly to the Internet acting as a
gateway device is bad news, especially if the O/S is not *harden* to
attack -- IMHO.

One of the purposes of the router is to protect the LAN from unsolicited
inbound scans and attacks to the LAN from the Internet. If for some
reason even on a dial-up that 1,000 of scan packets were sent to your
LAN, the computer acting as a gateway device will be put to its knees as
the O/S and the FW would have to react to it, slowing the entire LAN down
as it dealt with it.

As opposed to a router sitting in front of the machines as the gateway
device, that will stop the attacks upfront and the never reach a machine
on the LAN.

Duane :) 
Anonymous
April 20, 2004 3:23:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

<snip>

Patience, grasshopper. You must learn to take things as they come.
:-)

A) I don't have a dialup router or an external modem to connect to it.
This was all done on the spur of the moment with equipment I have on
hand.
B) In spite of my obvious lack of high-speed access, I am a
network/server admin by profession. The XP Pro system is locked down
as tightly as I can get it and still let it connect to the internet.
C) I disabled McAfee Firewall because it wouldn't let me define port
openings manually. Believe it or not, MS Internet Connection Firewall
will.
D) My ultimate plan is to put together a low-end box with the 100 Mbps
NIC and the dialup modem and load Smoothwall (www.smoothwall.org).
That system will replace the WinXP system, which will then move behind
the WAP and enjoy the protection of the LAN.
E) I did this because I can!

Steve

> This is not meant as a putdown as you obviously did a fine job. But why
> would you not use a cheap dial-up router with an rs232 connected to the
> modem as the gateway device for the LAN and WAN? Then you could have the
> wireless Linksys plugged into the dial-up router acting as a WAP.
>
> To have a Windows O/S connected directly to the Internet acting as a
> gateway device is bad news, especially if the O/S is not *harden* to
> attack -- IMHO.
>
> One of the purposes of the router is to protect the LAN from unsolicited
> inbound scans and attacks to the LAN from the Internet. If for some
> reason even on a dial-up that 1,000 of scan packets were sent to your
> LAN, the computer acting as a gateway device will be put to its knees as
> the O/S and the FW would have to react to it, slowing the entire LAN down
> as it dealt with it.
>
> As opposed to a router sitting in front of the machines as the gateway
> device, that will stop the attacks upfront and the never reach a machine
> on the LAN.
>
> Duane :) 
Anonymous
April 21, 2004 3:02:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

steventhomas42@yahoo.com (Steve Thomas) wrote in
news:811942d0.0404201023.60e0abbb@posting.google.com:

> <snip>
>
> Patience, grasshopper. You must learn to take things as they come.
>:-)
>
> A) I don't have a dialup router or an external modem to connect to it.
> This was all done on the spur of the moment with equipment I have on
> hand.
> B) In spite of my obvious lack of high-speed access, I am a
> network/server admin by profession. The XP Pro system is locked down
> as tightly as I can get it and still let it connect to the internet.
> C) I disabled McAfee Firewall because it wouldn't let me define port
> openings manually. Believe it or not, MS Internet Connection Firewall
> will.


> D) My ultimate plan is to put together a low-end box with the 100 Mbps
> NIC and the dialup modem and load Smoothwall (www.smoothwall.org).
> That system will replace the WinXP system, which will then move behind
> the WAP and enjoy the protection of the LAN.
> E) I did this because I can!
>
> Steve

Then might I suggest that you supplement that ICF on XP with IPsec, until
such time you go to the big dog. :) 

A simple usage

http://www.petri.co.il/block_ping_traffic_with_ipsec.ht...

The more advanced and it can stop inbound or outbound by port, IP,
protocol, DNS, subnet etc, etc for the LAN!

http://www.analogx.com/contents/articles/ipsec.htm

This grasshopper has been around a little bit! :) 

Duane :) 
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