Dell Certified Systems Expert

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I am not interested in servicing other people's computers, but I do enjoy
computers as a hobby.

Dell offers a self-study course for Associate-level DCSE training. If anyone
has taken this course (or the classroom version of same), can you tell me
what it covers? Do you suppose it would be interesting to a hobbyist with a
geek streak?

Ted Zieglar
19 answers Last reply
More about dell certified systems expert
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I have Ted,as an employeee we have to take them, they cover all current
    models and you have to take each exam each year to stay Certified. The exams
    themselves are fairly straight forward and cover all aspects of stripping
    down the machines as well as hardware configuration
    "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    news:F%W1e.7$Og4.2019479@news.sisna.com...
    >I am not interested in servicing other people's computers, but I do enjoy
    > computers as a hobby.
    >
    > Dell offers a self-study course for Associate-level DCSE training. If
    > anyone
    > has taken this course (or the classroom version of same), can you tell me
    > what it covers? Do you suppose it would be interesting to a hobbyist with
    > a
    > geek streak?
    >
    > Ted Zieglar
    >
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Thanks for your reply. I wouldn't be interested in the certification
    actually, just the education. If it teaches about "stripping down the
    machines as well as hardware configuration" that sounds like something I
    might really enjoy. I'm doing this for the pure fun of learning, and since I
    plan to stick with Dell computers in the future, it could help me learn
    about my computer.

    Ted Zieglar

    "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:d2a299$d6u$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >I have Ted,as an employeee we have to take them, they cover all current
    >models and you have to take each exam each year to stay Certified. The
    >exams themselves are fairly straight forward and cover all aspects of
    >stripping down the machines as well as hardware configuration
    > "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:F%W1e.7$Og4.2019479@news.sisna.com...
    >>I am not interested in servicing other people's computers, but I do enjoy
    >> computers as a hobby.
    >>
    >> Dell offers a self-study course for Associate-level DCSE training. If
    >> anyone
    >> has taken this course (or the classroom version of same), can you tell me
    >> what it covers? Do you suppose it would be interesting to a hobbyist with
    >> a
    >> geek streak?
    >>
    >> Ted Zieglar
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Ted,

    Consider the A+ program. I think it will be more useful.

    Tom
    "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    news:PvadnS50J-B2JdXfRVn-gA@comcast.com...
    > Thanks for your reply. I wouldn't be interested in the certification
    > actually, just the education. If it teaches about "stripping down the
    > machines as well as hardware configuration" that sounds like something I
    > might really enjoy. I'm doing this for the pure fun of learning, and since
    > I plan to stick with Dell computers in the future, it could help me learn
    > about my computer.
    >
    > Ted Zieglar
    >
    > "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    > news:d2a299$d6u$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >>I have Ted,as an employeee we have to take them, they cover all current
    >>models and you have to take each exam each year to stay Certified. The
    >>exams themselves are fairly straight forward and cover all aspects of
    >>stripping down the machines as well as hardware configuration
    >> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:F%W1e.7$Og4.2019479@news.sisna.com...
    >>>I am not interested in servicing other people's computers, but I do enjoy
    >>> computers as a hobby.
    >>>
    >>> Dell offers a self-study course for Associate-level DCSE training. If
    >>> anyone
    >>> has taken this course (or the classroom version of same), can you tell
    >>> me
    >>> what it covers? Do you suppose it would be interesting to a hobbyist
    >>> with a
    >>> geek streak?
    >>>
    >>> Ted Zieglar
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "The A+ program"...I'm not familiar with it. Is it sponsored by Dell
    (forgive my ignorance) and could you post a URL for it?

    Ted Zieglar

    "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
    news:9m32e.7128$vd.2557@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
    > Ted,
    >
    > Consider the A+ program. I think it will be more useful.
    >
    > Tom
    > "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:PvadnS50J-B2JdXfRVn-gA@comcast.com...
    >> Thanks for your reply. I wouldn't be interested in the certification
    >> actually, just the education. If it teaches about "stripping down the
    >> machines as well as hardware configuration" that sounds like something I
    >> might really enjoy. I'm doing this for the pure fun of learning, and
    >> since I plan to stick with Dell computers in the future, it could help me
    >> learn about my computer.
    >>
    >> Ted Zieglar
    >>
    >> "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    >> news:d2a299$d6u$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >>>I have Ted,as an employeee we have to take them, they cover all current
    >>>models and you have to take each exam each year to stay Certified. The
    >>>exams themselves are fairly straight forward and cover all aspects of
    >>>stripping down the machines as well as hardware configuration
    >>> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:F%W1e.7$Og4.2019479@news.sisna.com...
    >>>>I am not interested in servicing other people's computers, but I do
    >>>>enjoy
    >>>> computers as a hobby.
    >>>>
    >>>> Dell offers a self-study course for Associate-level DCSE training. If
    >>>> anyone
    >>>> has taken this course (or the classroom version of same), can you tell
    >>>> me
    >>>> what it covers? Do you suppose it would be interesting to a hobbyist
    >>>> with a
    >>>> geek streak?
    >>>>
    >>>> Ted Zieglar
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    news:CfCdnVllOIVHUtXfRVn-2Q@comcast.com...
    > "The A+ program"...I'm not familiar with it. Is it sponsored by Dell
    > (forgive my ignorance) and could you post a URL for it?
    >
    > Ted Zieglar

    Comptia A+

    http://www.comptia.org/certification/a/default.aspx

    Steve
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Ted,

    The A+ Certification program teaches you to repair almost any computer.
    Everything from ribbon cables to power supplies and just about everything in
    between.

    Your local Vo-Tech school, or Career & Technology center should offer an
    on-line course.

    Here's an example form one here in central PA.

    http://www.ed2go.com/cgi-bin/newoic/newofferings.cgi?name=gactc&dept=CC

    Joe

    "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    news:CfCdnVllOIVHUtXfRVn-2Q@comcast.com...
    > "The A+ program"...I'm not familiar with it. Is it sponsored by Dell
    > (forgive my ignorance) and could you post a URL for it?
    >
    > Ted Zieglar
    >
    > "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
    > news:9m32e.7128$vd.2557@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
    >> Ted,
    >>
    >> Consider the A+ program. I think it will be more useful.
    >>
    >> Tom
    >> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:PvadnS50J-B2JdXfRVn-gA@comcast.com...
    >>> Thanks for your reply. I wouldn't be interested in the certification
    >>> actually, just the education. If it teaches about "stripping down the
    >>> machines as well as hardware configuration" that sounds like something I
    >>> might really enjoy. I'm doing this for the pure fun of learning, and
    >>> since I plan to stick with Dell computers in the future, it could help
    >>> me learn about my computer.
    >>>
    >>> Ted Zieglar
    >>>
    >>> "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:d2a299$d6u$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >>>>I have Ted,as an employeee we have to take them, they cover all current
    >>>>models and you have to take each exam each year to stay Certified. The
    >>>>exams themselves are fairly straight forward and cover all aspects of
    >>>>stripping down the machines as well as hardware configuration
    >>>> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >>>> news:F%W1e.7$Og4.2019479@news.sisna.com...
    >>>>>I am not interested in servicing other people's computers, but I do
    >>>>>enjoy
    >>>>> computers as a hobby.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Dell offers a self-study course for Associate-level DCSE training. If
    >>>>> anyone
    >>>>> has taken this course (or the classroom version of same), can you tell
    >>>>> me
    >>>>> what it covers? Do you suppose it would be interesting to a hobbyist
    >>>>> with a
    >>>>> geek streak?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Ted Zieglar
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Very cool. Thanks to Steve and joe.

    Ted Zieglar

    "joe_tide" <joetide@nowhere.com> wrote in message
    news:114hlniirejo92c@corp.supernews.com...
    > Ted,
    >
    > The A+ Certification program teaches you to repair almost any computer.
    > Everything from ribbon cables to power supplies and just about everything
    > in between.
    >
    > Your local Vo-Tech school, or Career & Technology center should offer an
    > on-line course.
    >
    > Here's an example form one here in central PA.
    >
    > http://www.ed2go.com/cgi-bin/newoic/newofferings.cgi?name=gactc&dept=CC
    >
    > Joe
    >
    > "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:CfCdnVllOIVHUtXfRVn-2Q@comcast.com...
    >> "The A+ program"...I'm not familiar with it. Is it sponsored by Dell
    >> (forgive my ignorance) and could you post a URL for it?
    >>
    >> Ted Zieglar
    >>
    >> "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
    >> news:9m32e.7128$vd.2557@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
    >>> Ted,
    >>>
    >>> Consider the A+ program. I think it will be more useful.
    >>>
    >>> Tom
    >>> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:PvadnS50J-B2JdXfRVn-gA@comcast.com...
    >>>> Thanks for your reply. I wouldn't be interested in the certification
    >>>> actually, just the education. If it teaches about "stripping down the
    >>>> machines as well as hardware configuration" that sounds like something
    >>>> I might really enjoy. I'm doing this for the pure fun of learning, and
    >>>> since I plan to stick with Dell computers in the future, it could help
    >>>> me learn about my computer.
    >>>>
    >>>> Ted Zieglar
    >>>>
    >>>> "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    >>>> news:d2a299$d6u$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >>>>>I have Ted,as an employeee we have to take them, they cover all current
    >>>>>models and you have to take each exam each year to stay Certified. The
    >>>>>exams themselves are fairly straight forward and cover all aspects of
    >>>>>stripping down the machines as well as hardware configuration
    >>>>> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:F%W1e.7$Og4.2019479@news.sisna.com...
    >>>>>>I am not interested in servicing other people's computers, but I do
    >>>>>>enjoy
    >>>>>> computers as a hobby.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Dell offers a self-study course for Associate-level DCSE training. If
    >>>>>> anyone
    >>>>>> has taken this course (or the classroom version of same), can you
    >>>>>> tell me
    >>>>>> what it covers? Do you suppose it would be interesting to a hobbyist
    >>>>>> with a
    >>>>>> geek streak?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Ted Zieglar
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Just out of mind curiousity, what does Dell charge for the DCSE courses? As an
    independent service provider, what benefit is there to me? I already rip apart
    just about any type of Dell computer (except notebooks which require more TLC)
    with my bare hands blindfolded, and get them back together again... Ben Myers

    On Mon, 28 Mar 2005 23:59:57 +0100, "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote:

    >I have Ted,as an employeee we have to take them, they cover all current
    >models and you have to take each exam each year to stay Certified. The exams
    >themselves are fairly straight forward and cover all aspects of stripping
    >down the machines as well as hardware configuration
    >"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:F%W1e.7$Og4.2019479@news.sisna.com...
    >>I am not interested in servicing other people's computers, but I do enjoy
    >> computers as a hobby.
    >>
    >> Dell offers a self-study course for Associate-level DCSE training. If
    >> anyone
    >> has taken this course (or the classroom version of same), can you tell me
    >> what it covers? Do you suppose it would be interesting to a hobbyist with
    >> a
    >> geek streak?
    >>
    >> Ted Zieglar
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Ben Myers posted for all of us...

    > Just out of mind curiousity, what does Dell charge for the DCSE courses? As an
    > independent service provider, what benefit is there to me? I already rip apart
    > just about any type of Dell computer (except notebooks which require more TLC)
    > with my bare hands blindfolded, and get them back together again... Ben Myers
    >
    IIRC last year they were about $180. I got a notice the price is going up
    in May.

    For us it's very easy parts access.
    --

    Tekkie
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I think its about $500 per exam but dont quote me on it as the company pays
    for ours
    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:42497e9f.10412518@nntp.charter.net...
    > Just out of mind curiousity, what does Dell charge for the DCSE courses?
    > As an
    > independent service provider, what benefit is there to me? I already rip
    > apart
    > just about any type of Dell computer (except notebooks which require more
    > TLC)
    > with my bare hands blindfolded, and get them back together again... Ben
    > Myers
    >
    > On Mon, 28 Mar 2005 23:59:57 +0100, "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote:
    >
    >>I have Ted,as an employeee we have to take them, they cover all current
    >>models and you have to take each exam each year to stay Certified. The
    >>exams
    >>themselves are fairly straight forward and cover all aspects of stripping
    >>down the machines as well as hardware configuration
    >>"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >>news:F%W1e.7$Og4.2019479@news.sisna.com...
    >>>I am not interested in servicing other people's computers, but I do enjoy
    >>> computers as a hobby.
    >>>
    >>> Dell offers a self-study course for Associate-level DCSE training. If
    >>> anyone
    >>> has taken this course (or the classroom version of same), can you tell
    >>> me
    >>> what it covers? Do you suppose it would be interesting to a hobbyist
    >>> with
    >>> a
    >>> geek streak?
    >>>
    >>> Ted Zieglar
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:

    >Just out of mind curiousity, what does Dell charge for the DCSE courses? As an
    >independent service provider, what benefit is there to me? I already rip apart
    >just about any type of Dell computer (except notebooks which require more TLC)
    >with my bare hands blindfolded, and get them back together again... Ben Myers

    Remember, the OP's request was in terms of /learning/ to do what
    you are already doing with your bare hands and blindfolded.

    Someone else has already replied with a, maybe outdated, figure
    of $180 for the course(s).

    Back in the BODD, and into the early Win era, I went through a
    real h/w geek spell, and there were a /lot/ of readily available,
    relatively cheap books out there that, as long as you kept up
    with current info from Byte/PC Mag/et al, you could learn how to
    "rip apart [computers] with your bare hands blindfolded", and
    even how to put the together, either from scratch or back. ;->.
    [One of the main ones from that era sticks, dimly, in my mind as
    "How to Upgrade and Repair Your PC" or somesuch.]

    Alas, not all of us are fitted for unstructured learning of this
    sort, either at all or for a given area. I did fine with
    computer stuff, but I learned long ago that if I were ever going
    to do car stuff for fun, I'd need a lot of instruction/classes.
    For those, this Dell thing, at under $200 might be just the
    thing.

    I'd also suggest that the OP, presuming he lives in a reasonably
    large metro sort of area, check out local colleges, HS adult ed
    programs, or city/town/county run programs [Alexandria VA's Dept
    of Recreation offers a number of computer courses for its
    residents at nominal cost]. Again in the DC area, the Capital PC
    User Group offers a lot of courses to their members, including a
    paired "Before you Buy or Build" course on the basics, followed
    by a "Build Your Own" workshop where instructors/volunteers help
    you build if you decided on Build.

    Like so much else in the world, there are so many different ways
    to learn computer basics because there are so many different ways
    folks learn thing best. However trite, "different strokes for
    different folks" is an axiom on so much of life.
    --
    OJ III
    [Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
    Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Agree with all you said. But I'll repeat: " As an independent service provider,
    what benefit, if any, is there to me from a DCSE course?"

    At lot of my unstructured work was under the auspices of PC Labs, PC Magazine,
    PC Week, and Ziff-Davis Labs, back in the day when printed computer media was
    king, Computer Shopper and PC Magazine ran 500 or 600 pages per issue, and many
    companies ran a lot of printed ads. Back in the days before the internet became
    king. A great learning environment, and with pay and generous expenses, too.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 11:57:59 -0500, Ogden Johnson III <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
    >
    >>Just out of mind curiousity, what does Dell charge for the DCSE courses? As an
    >>independent service provider, what benefit is there to me? I already rip apart
    >>just about any type of Dell computer (except notebooks which require more TLC)
    >>with my bare hands blindfolded, and get them back together again... Ben Myers
    >
    >Remember, the OP's request was in terms of /learning/ to do what
    >you are already doing with your bare hands and blindfolded.
    >
    >Someone else has already replied with a, maybe outdated, figure
    >of $180 for the course(s).
    >
    >Back in the BODD, and into the early Win era, I went through a
    >real h/w geek spell, and there were a /lot/ of readily available,
    >relatively cheap books out there that, as long as you kept up
    >with current info from Byte/PC Mag/et al, you could learn how to
    >"rip apart [computers] with your bare hands blindfolded", and
    >even how to put the together, either from scratch or back. ;->.
    >[One of the main ones from that era sticks, dimly, in my mind as
    >"How to Upgrade and Repair Your PC" or somesuch.]
    >
    >Alas, not all of us are fitted for unstructured learning of this
    >sort, either at all or for a given area. I did fine with
    >computer stuff, but I learned long ago that if I were ever going
    >to do car stuff for fun, I'd need a lot of instruction/classes.
    >For those, this Dell thing, at under $200 might be just the
    >thing.
    >
    >I'd also suggest that the OP, presuming he lives in a reasonably
    >large metro sort of area, check out local colleges, HS adult ed
    >programs, or city/town/county run programs [Alexandria VA's Dept
    >of Recreation offers a number of computer courses for its
    >residents at nominal cost]. Again in the DC area, the Capital PC
    >User Group offers a lot of courses to their members, including a
    >paired "Before you Buy or Build" course on the basics, followed
    >by a "Build Your Own" workshop where instructors/volunteers help
    >you build if you decided on Build.
    >
    >Like so much else in the world, there are so many different ways
    >to learn computer basics because there are so many different ways
    >folks learn thing best. However trite, "different strokes for
    >different folks" is an axiom on so much of life.
    >--
    >OJ III
    >[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
    >Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
  13. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    From a business point of view:

    In looking for new business, there may be some companies who would go
    for a tech who had those 4 letters on his/her proposal over one who did
    not have them.

    Dell does have "some" proprietary stuff loaded into their systems.
    Someone with DCSE "training" may have some additional insight as to what
    is Dell and what is generic.

    HTH

    Tom S.
    Houston, TX


    Ben Myers wrote:
    > Agree with all you said. But I'll repeat: " As an independent service provider,
    > what benefit, if any, is there to me from a DCSE course?"
    >
    > At lot of my unstructured work was under the auspices of PC Labs, PC Magazine,
    > PC Week, and Ziff-Davis Labs, back in the day when printed computer media was
    > king, Computer Shopper and PC Magazine ran 500 or 600 pages per issue, and many
    > companies ran a lot of printed ads. Back in the days before the internet became
    > king. A great learning environment, and with pay and generous expenses, too.
    >
    > ... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 11:57:59 -0500, Ogden Johnson III <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Just out of mind curiousity, what does Dell charge for the DCSE courses? As an
    >>>independent service provider, what benefit is there to me? I already rip apart
    >>>just about any type of Dell computer (except notebooks which require more TLC)
    >>>with my bare hands blindfolded, and get them back together again... Ben Myers
    >>
    >>Remember, the OP's request was in terms of /learning/ to do what
    >>you are already doing with your bare hands and blindfolded.
    >>
    >>Someone else has already replied with a, maybe outdated, figure
    >>of $180 for the course(s).
    >>
    >>Back in the BODD, and into the early Win era, I went through a
    >>real h/w geek spell, and there were a /lot/ of readily available,
    >>relatively cheap books out there that, as long as you kept up
    >>with current info from Byte/PC Mag/et al, you could learn how to
    >>"rip apart [computers] with your bare hands blindfolded", and
    >>even how to put the together, either from scratch or back. ;->.
    >>[One of the main ones from that era sticks, dimly, in my mind as
    >>"How to Upgrade and Repair Your PC" or somesuch.]
    >>
    >>Alas, not all of us are fitted for unstructured learning of this
    >>sort, either at all or for a given area. I did fine with
    >>computer stuff, but I learned long ago that if I were ever going
    >>to do car stuff for fun, I'd need a lot of instruction/classes.
    >>For those, this Dell thing, at under $200 might be just the
    >>thing.
    >>
    >>I'd also suggest that the OP, presuming he lives in a reasonably
    >>large metro sort of area, check out local colleges, HS adult ed
    >>programs, or city/town/county run programs [Alexandria VA's Dept
    >>of Recreation offers a number of computer courses for its
    >>residents at nominal cost]. Again in the DC area, the Capital PC
    >>User Group offers a lot of courses to their members, including a
    >>paired "Before you Buy or Build" course on the basics, followed
    >>by a "Build Your Own" workshop where instructors/volunteers help
    >>you build if you decided on Build.
    >>
    >>Like so much else in the world, there are so many different ways
    >>to learn computer basics because there are so many different ways
    >>folks learn thing best. However trite, "different strokes for
    >>different folks" is an axiom on so much of life.
    >>--
    >>OJ III
    >>[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
    >>Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
    >
    >
  14. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Agreed. This is the same argument put forward for spending even more bucks on
    Novell Certification (way back when) and Microsoft Certification. To be a
    certified Novell something-or-other meant a lot fifteen years ago, because
    Netware was a complicated command-oriented mess to configure and use. Microsoft
    certifications are of far more dubious value until one gets into the nitty
    gritties of all the various members of its server family. There's not much that
    being a Microsoft-certified software tech can do for me except make me poorer.
    Microsoft does deserve some grudging credit from this corner for simplifying the
    configuration and use of computers running Windows. (I still take strong
    exception to the unbelievably complicated and convoluted way Micro$oft has
    achieved this ease of use, and their blithering incompetence in the areas of
    system security and reliability.)

    Likewise, the lack of a DCSE has not inhibited me at all in troubleshooting,
    repairing, finding spare parts, upgrading or doing anything else to Dell
    desktop, workstation and server computers, including identification of what is
    proprietary and what is not. After having built and repaired countless
    computers over the last decade plus, it is not rocket science to see what is
    proprietary hardware and what is not. I can only do some basic work on Dell
    notebooks, but I have not tried to field strip them and put them back together.
    Dell deserves exceptional credit for having first rate user guides and service
    manuals on its web site for virtually every computer they've sold. Availability
    of this info makes maintenance of Dell hardware pretty easy in the event that
    the solution is not intuitively obvious without reading anything.

    I guess I'll remain mindful of the availability of DCSE and see whether any of
    my current or prospective clients require the paper credential for me to do work
    for them. So far, nobody has... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 20:18:51 GMT, Tom Simchak <not.today@thankyou.org> wrote:

    > From a business point of view:
    >
    >In looking for new business, there may be some companies who would go
    >for a tech who had those 4 letters on his/her proposal over one who did
    >not have them.
    >
    >Dell does have "some" proprietary stuff loaded into their systems.
    >Someone with DCSE "training" may have some additional insight as to what
    >is Dell and what is generic.
    >
    >HTH
    >
    >Tom S.
    >Houston, TX
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >Ben Myers wrote:
    >> Agree with all you said. But I'll repeat: " As an independent service provider,
    >> what benefit, if any, is there to me from a DCSE course?"
    >>
    >> At lot of my unstructured work was under the auspices of PC Labs, PC Magazine,
    >> PC Week, and Ziff-Davis Labs, back in the day when printed computer media was
    >> king, Computer Shopper and PC Magazine ran 500 or 600 pages per issue, and many
    >> companies ran a lot of printed ads. Back in the days before the internet became
    >> king. A great learning environment, and with pay and generous expenses, too.
    >>
    >> ... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 11:57:59 -0500, Ogden Johnson III <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Just out of mind curiousity, what does Dell charge for the DCSE courses? As an
    >>>>independent service provider, what benefit is there to me? I already rip apart
    >>>>just about any type of Dell computer (except notebooks which require more TLC)
    >>>>with my bare hands blindfolded, and get them back together again... Ben Myers
    >>>
    >>>Remember, the OP's request was in terms of /learning/ to do what
    >>>you are already doing with your bare hands and blindfolded.
    >>>
    >>>Someone else has already replied with a, maybe outdated, figure
    >>>of $180 for the course(s).
    >>>
    >>>Back in the BODD, and into the early Win era, I went through a
    >>>real h/w geek spell, and there were a /lot/ of readily available,
    >>>relatively cheap books out there that, as long as you kept up
    >>>with current info from Byte/PC Mag/et al, you could learn how to
    >>>"rip apart [computers] with your bare hands blindfolded", and
    >>>even how to put the together, either from scratch or back. ;->.
    >>>[One of the main ones from that era sticks, dimly, in my mind as
    >>>"How to Upgrade and Repair Your PC" or somesuch.]
    >>>
    >>>Alas, not all of us are fitted for unstructured learning of this
    >>>sort, either at all or for a given area. I did fine with
    >>>computer stuff, but I learned long ago that if I were ever going
    >>>to do car stuff for fun, I'd need a lot of instruction/classes.
    >>>For those, this Dell thing, at under $200 might be just the
    >>>thing.
    >>>
    >>>I'd also suggest that the OP, presuming he lives in a reasonably
    >>>large metro sort of area, check out local colleges, HS adult ed
    >>>programs, or city/town/county run programs [Alexandria VA's Dept
    >>>of Recreation offers a number of computer courses for its
    >>>residents at nominal cost]. Again in the DC area, the Capital PC
    >>>User Group offers a lot of courses to their members, including a
    >>>paired "Before you Buy or Build" course on the basics, followed
    >>>by a "Build Your Own" workshop where instructors/volunteers help
    >>>you build if you decided on Build.
    >>>
    >>>Like so much else in the world, there are so many different ways
    >>>to learn computer basics because there are so many different ways
    >>>folks learn thing best. However trite, "different strokes for
    >>>different folks" is an axiom on so much of life.
    >>>--
    >>>OJ III
    >>>[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
    >>>Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
    >>
    >>
  15. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I agree, Ben. With all due respect to Dell, certification sounds like
    something you get so that you can advertise that you have been 'certified by
    Dell'. If you want to attract retail business it might be an advantage.

    Ted Zieglar

    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:424d55d6.5478216@nntp.charter.net...
    > Agreed. This is the same argument put forward for spending even more
    bucks on
    > Novell Certification (way back when) and Microsoft Certification. To be
    a
    > certified Novell something-or-other meant a lot fifteen years ago, because
    > Netware was a complicated command-oriented mess to configure and use.
    Microsoft
    > certifications are of far more dubious value until one gets into the nitty
    > gritties of all the various members of its server family. There's not
    much that
    > being a Microsoft-certified software tech can do for me except make me
    poorer.
    > Microsoft does deserve some grudging credit from this corner for
    simplifying the
    > configuration and use of computers running Windows. (I still take strong
    > exception to the unbelievably complicated and convoluted way Micro$oft has
    > achieved this ease of use, and their blithering incompetence in the areas
    of
    > system security and reliability.)
    >
    > Likewise, the lack of a DCSE has not inhibited me at all in
    troubleshooting,
    > repairing, finding spare parts, upgrading or doing anything else to Dell
    > desktop, workstation and server computers, including identification of
    what is
    > proprietary and what is not. After having built and repaired countless
    > computers over the last decade plus, it is not rocket science to see what
    is
    > proprietary hardware and what is not. I can only do some basic work on
    Dell
    > notebooks, but I have not tried to field strip them and put them back
    together.
    > Dell deserves exceptional credit for having first rate user guides and
    service
    > manuals on its web site for virtually every computer they've sold.
    Availability
    > of this info makes maintenance of Dell hardware pretty easy in the event
    that
    > the solution is not intuitively obvious without reading anything.
    >
    > I guess I'll remain mindful of the availability of DCSE and see whether
    any of
    > my current or prospective clients require the paper credential for me to
    do work
    > for them. So far, nobody has... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 20:18:51 GMT, Tom Simchak <not.today@thankyou.org>
    wrote:
    >
    > > From a business point of view:
    > >
    > >In looking for new business, there may be some companies who would go
    > >for a tech who had those 4 letters on his/her proposal over one who did
    > >not have them.
    > >
    > >Dell does have "some" proprietary stuff loaded into their systems.
    > >Someone with DCSE "training" may have some additional insight as to what
    > >is Dell and what is generic.
    > >
    > >HTH
    > >
    > >Tom S.
    > >Houston, TX
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >Ben Myers wrote:
    > >> Agree with all you said. But I'll repeat: " As an independent service
    provider,
    > >> what benefit, if any, is there to me from a DCSE course?"
    > >>
    > >> At lot of my unstructured work was under the auspices of PC Labs, PC
    Magazine,
    > >> PC Week, and Ziff-Davis Labs, back in the day when printed computer
    media was
    > >> king, Computer Shopper and PC Magazine ran 500 or 600 pages per issue,
    and many
    > >> companies ran a lot of printed ads. Back in the days before the
    internet became
    > >> king. A great learning environment, and with pay and generous
    expenses, too.
    > >>
    > >> ... Ben Myers
    > >>
    > >> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 11:57:59 -0500, Ogden Johnson III
    <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>Just out of mind curiousity, what does Dell charge for the DCSE
    courses? As an
    > >>>>independent service provider, what benefit is there to me? I already
    rip apart
    > >>>>just about any type of Dell computer (except notebooks which require
    more TLC)
    > >>>>with my bare hands blindfolded, and get them back together again...
    Ben Myers
    > >>>
    > >>>Remember, the OP's request was in terms of /learning/ to do what
    > >>>you are already doing with your bare hands and blindfolded.
    > >>>
    > >>>Someone else has already replied with a, maybe outdated, figure
    > >>>of $180 for the course(s).
    > >>>
    > >>>Back in the BODD, and into the early Win era, I went through a
    > >>>real h/w geek spell, and there were a /lot/ of readily available,
    > >>>relatively cheap books out there that, as long as you kept up
    > >>>with current info from Byte/PC Mag/et al, you could learn how to
    > >>>"rip apart [computers] with your bare hands blindfolded", and
    > >>>even how to put the together, either from scratch or back. ;->.
    > >>>[One of the main ones from that era sticks, dimly, in my mind as
    > >>>"How to Upgrade and Repair Your PC" or somesuch.]
    > >>>
    > >>>Alas, not all of us are fitted for unstructured learning of this
    > >>>sort, either at all or for a given area. I did fine with
    > >>>computer stuff, but I learned long ago that if I were ever going
    > >>>to do car stuff for fun, I'd need a lot of instruction/classes.
    > >>>For those, this Dell thing, at under $200 might be just the
    > >>>thing.
    > >>>
    > >>>I'd also suggest that the OP, presuming he lives in a reasonably
    > >>>large metro sort of area, check out local colleges, HS adult ed
    > >>>programs, or city/town/county run programs [Alexandria VA's Dept
    > >>>of Recreation offers a number of computer courses for its
    > >>>residents at nominal cost]. Again in the DC area, the Capital PC
    > >>>User Group offers a lot of courses to their members, including a
    > >>>paired "Before you Buy or Build" course on the basics, followed
    > >>>by a "Build Your Own" workshop where instructors/volunteers help
    > >>>you build if you decided on Build.
    > >>>
    > >>>Like so much else in the world, there are so many different ways
    > >>>to learn computer basics because there are so many different ways
    > >>>folks learn thing best. However trite, "different strokes for
    > >>>different folks" is an axiom on so much of life.
    > >>>--
    > >>>OJ III
    > >>>[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
    > >>>Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
    > >>
    > >>
    >
  16. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Ben Myers wrote:
    > Agreed. This is the same argument put forward for spending even more bucks on
    > Novell Certification (way back when) and Microsoft Certification. To be a
    > certified Novell something-or-other meant a lot fifteen years ago, because
    > Netware was a complicated command-oriented mess to configure and use. Microsoft
    > certifications are of far more dubious value until one gets into the nitty
    > gritties of all the various members of its server family. There's not much that
    > being a Microsoft-certified software tech can do for me except make me poorer.
    > Microsoft does deserve some grudging credit from this corner for simplifying the
    > configuration and use of computers running Windows. (I still take strong
    > exception to the unbelievably complicated and convoluted way Micro$oft has
    > achieved this ease of use, and their blithering incompetence in the areas of
    > system security and reliability.)

    "Designed BY hackers FOR hackers!"

    What I think MS's mottoe should be.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I deal a lot with small to medium businesses and SOHO owners. None of them seem
    to get wrapped around the axle about any sort of certification. All they want
    is to get results.

    On the other hand, if a DCSE would get warranty service work thrown in his
    direction with a reasonable pay rate, then the sheepskin would be worth
    something. I do not think that is the case, so I'll blunder ahead blindly on my
    own. As it is, I do enough service work on Dell systems under warranty, because
    my customers trust me and I do not let them down... Ben Myers

    On Fri, 1 Apr 2005 09:42:23 -0500, "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote:

    >I agree, Ben. With all due respect to Dell, certification sounds like
    >something you get so that you can advertise that you have been 'certified by
    >Dell'. If you want to attract retail business it might be an advantage.
    >
    >Ted Zieglar
    >
    ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >news:424d55d6.5478216@nntp.charter.net...
    >> Agreed. This is the same argument put forward for spending even more
    >bucks on
    >> Novell Certification (way back when) and Microsoft Certification. To be
    >a
    >> certified Novell something-or-other meant a lot fifteen years ago, because
    >> Netware was a complicated command-oriented mess to configure and use.
    >Microsoft
    >> certifications are of far more dubious value until one gets into the nitty
    >> gritties of all the various members of its server family. There's not
    >much that
    >> being a Microsoft-certified software tech can do for me except make me
    >poorer.
    >> Microsoft does deserve some grudging credit from this corner for
    >simplifying the
    >> configuration and use of computers running Windows. (I still take strong
    >> exception to the unbelievably complicated and convoluted way Micro$oft has
    >> achieved this ease of use, and their blithering incompetence in the areas
    >of
    >> system security and reliability.)
    >>
    >> Likewise, the lack of a DCSE has not inhibited me at all in
    >troubleshooting,
    >> repairing, finding spare parts, upgrading or doing anything else to Dell
    >> desktop, workstation and server computers, including identification of
    >what is
    >> proprietary and what is not. After having built and repaired countless
    >> computers over the last decade plus, it is not rocket science to see what
    >is
    >> proprietary hardware and what is not. I can only do some basic work on
    >Dell
    >> notebooks, but I have not tried to field strip them and put them back
    >together.
    >> Dell deserves exceptional credit for having first rate user guides and
    >service
    >> manuals on its web site for virtually every computer they've sold.
    >Availability
    >> of this info makes maintenance of Dell hardware pretty easy in the event
    >that
    >> the solution is not intuitively obvious without reading anything.
    >>
    >> I guess I'll remain mindful of the availability of DCSE and see whether
    >any of
    >> my current or prospective clients require the paper credential for me to
    >do work
    >> for them. So far, nobody has... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 20:18:51 GMT, Tom Simchak <not.today@thankyou.org>
    >wrote:
    >>
    >> > From a business point of view:
    >> >
    >> >In looking for new business, there may be some companies who would go
    >> >for a tech who had those 4 letters on his/her proposal over one who did
    >> >not have them.
    >> >
    >> >Dell does have "some" proprietary stuff loaded into their systems.
    >> >Someone with DCSE "training" may have some additional insight as to what
    >> >is Dell and what is generic.
    >> >
    >> >HTH
    >> >
    >> >Tom S.
    >> >Houston, TX
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >Ben Myers wrote:
    >> >> Agree with all you said. But I'll repeat: " As an independent service
    >provider,
    >> >> what benefit, if any, is there to me from a DCSE course?"
    >> >>
    >> >> At lot of my unstructured work was under the auspices of PC Labs, PC
    >Magazine,
    >> >> PC Week, and Ziff-Davis Labs, back in the day when printed computer
    >media was
    >> >> king, Computer Shopper and PC Magazine ran 500 or 600 pages per issue,
    >and many
    >> >> companies ran a lot of printed ads. Back in the days before the
    >internet became
    >> >> king. A great learning environment, and with pay and generous
    >expenses, too.
    >> >>
    >> >> ... Ben Myers
    >> >>
    >> >> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 11:57:59 -0500, Ogden Johnson III
    ><oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>>ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
    >> >>>
    >> >>>
    >> >>>>Just out of mind curiousity, what does Dell charge for the DCSE
    >courses? As an
    >> >>>>independent service provider, what benefit is there to me? I already
    >rip apart
    >> >>>>just about any type of Dell computer (except notebooks which require
    >more TLC)
    >> >>>>with my bare hands blindfolded, and get them back together again...
    >Ben Myers
    >> >>>
    >> >>>Remember, the OP's request was in terms of /learning/ to do what
    >> >>>you are already doing with your bare hands and blindfolded.
    >> >>>
    >> >>>Someone else has already replied with a, maybe outdated, figure
    >> >>>of $180 for the course(s).
    >> >>>
    >> >>>Back in the BODD, and into the early Win era, I went through a
    >> >>>real h/w geek spell, and there were a /lot/ of readily available,
    >> >>>relatively cheap books out there that, as long as you kept up
    >> >>>with current info from Byte/PC Mag/et al, you could learn how to
    >> >>>"rip apart [computers] with your bare hands blindfolded", and
    >> >>>even how to put the together, either from scratch or back. ;->.
    >> >>>[One of the main ones from that era sticks, dimly, in my mind as
    >> >>>"How to Upgrade and Repair Your PC" or somesuch.]
    >> >>>
    >> >>>Alas, not all of us are fitted for unstructured learning of this
    >> >>>sort, either at all or for a given area. I did fine with
    >> >>>computer stuff, but I learned long ago that if I were ever going
    >> >>>to do car stuff for fun, I'd need a lot of instruction/classes.
    >> >>>For those, this Dell thing, at under $200 might be just the
    >> >>>thing.
    >> >>>
    >> >>>I'd also suggest that the OP, presuming he lives in a reasonably
    >> >>>large metro sort of area, check out local colleges, HS adult ed
    >> >>>programs, or city/town/county run programs [Alexandria VA's Dept
    >> >>>of Recreation offers a number of computer courses for its
    >> >>>residents at nominal cost]. Again in the DC area, the Capital PC
    >> >>>User Group offers a lot of courses to their members, including a
    >> >>>paired "Before you Buy or Build" course on the basics, followed
    >> >>>by a "Build Your Own" workshop where instructors/volunteers help
    >> >>>you build if you decided on Build.
    >> >>>
    >> >>>Like so much else in the world, there are so many different ways
    >> >>>to learn computer basics because there are so many different ways
    >> >>>folks learn thing best. However trite, "different strokes for
    >> >>>different folks" is an axiom on so much of life.
    >> >>>--
    >> >>>OJ III
    >> >>>[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
    >> >>>Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >>
    >
    >
  18. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Ben Myers wrote:
    > I deal a lot with small to medium businesses and SOHO owners. None of them seem
    > to get wrapped around the axle about any sort of certification. All they want
    > is to get results.
    >
    > On the other hand, if a DCSE would get warranty service work thrown in his
    > direction with a reasonable pay rate, then the sheepskin would be worth
    > something. I do not think that is the case, so I'll blunder ahead blindly on my
    > own. As it is, I do enough service work on Dell systems under warranty, because
    > my customers trust me and I do not let them down... Ben Myers

    Years ago (1968-69) the DPMA was trying to start a program to certify
    programmers a la the CPA. I took the test and got my "CDP" (Certified
    Data Processor) in '69 - was not asked about it even once thru my
    retirement in May, 2002.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Sparky Spartacus <Sparky@spartacus.galaxy.org> wrote:

    >Ben Myers wrote:
    >> I deal a lot with small to medium businesses and SOHO owners. None of them seem
    >> to get wrapped around the axle about any sort of certification. All they want
    >> is to get results.
    >>
    >> On the other hand, if a DCSE would get warranty service work thrown in his
    >> direction with a reasonable pay rate, then the sheepskin would be worth
    >> something. I do not think that is the case, so I'll blunder ahead blindly on my
    >> own. As it is, I do enough service work on Dell systems under warranty, because
    >> my customers trust me and I do not let them down... Ben Myers

    >Years ago (1968-69) the DPMA was trying to start a program to certify
    >programmers a la the CPA. I took the test and got my "CDP" (Certified
    >Data Processor) in '69 - was not asked about it even once thru my
    >retirement in May, 2002.

    As the one who seems to have sparked this subthread, let me again
    clarify that I was speaking/typing in terms of the OP's query,
    which was in terms of would the DCSE course work be worthwhile in
    terms of learning Dell computers, and by extension, computers in
    general for his own personal benefit. I was apparently too
    subtle in confirming Ben's observation that it was probably a
    useless exercise in his situation, and useful, as he says above,
    mostly for people looking to "... get warranty service work
    thrown in [their] direction ...."

    I was merely using Ben's post as a jumping point to explore what
    appears to be the OP's desire to move to a higher level of
    personal computer geekiness, at least as far as hardware goes,
    and not move into the professional computer techie arena. ;->

    To repeat what I was trying to convey earlier, some people are
    comfortable with the "on the job" approach, using books and
    hands-on tinkering; while others prefer a more formal, structured
    approach. Depending on what the DCSE course work covers [and I
    haven't explored it on the Dell web site], at $180 it isn't too
    expensive an alternative for the latter group. But I also
    pointed out some possibilities for less expensive, or sometimes
    even free/materials only, alternatives for that structured
    learning.
    --
    OJ III
    [Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
    Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
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