Rogers Wireless curbs Fido unit

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

I'm surprised nobody's posted this yet.

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1106779811499&call_pageid=970599119419

Jan. 27, 2005. 01:00 AM

Rogers Wireless curbs Fido unit
`Redesign' raises calling costs

Two new plans starting in March

TYLER HAMILTON
TECHNOLOGY REPORTER
Toronto Star

Rogers Wireless Inc. has put Fido on a shorter leash less than three months
after acquiring its master, Microcell Telecommunications Inc., by upping the
cost, capping the talk time and shrinking the coverage of its "unlimited"
CityFido plan.

Analysts said the changes, what Rogers is calling a "redesign," signal that
competition in Canada's wireless industry is beginning to cool off as the three
service providers left in the market put more emphasis on profits than
subscriber growth.

The situation stands in contrast with the U.S. market, where wireless plans
generally offer more value for less money.

"The bad thing about all of this is we're going to get back to where the
carriers are very conservative," said Mark Quigley, Canadian managing director
for the Yankee Group, a technology research firm.

"The Canadian carriers definitely have not been as aggressive on the price side
as they have been in the U.S. market. From a consumer's perspective it certainly
is a shot."

CityFido created a stir when it was first introduced because it offered
unlimited local calls for just $45, including the $6.95 monthly system access
fee its rivals routinely charge. Montreal-based Microcell promoted the
controversial plan as a replacement for traditional local-phone services
provided by Telus Corp. and Bell Canada.

When it was introduced in Vancouver in late 2003 and in Toronto last May, the
flat-rate plan sparked pricing battles in each market as Bell and Telus moved to
defend their respective turfs.

"What CityFido was trying to do was get rid of that local phone," said Brian
Sharwood, a telecom analyst with the Seaboard Group in Toronto. "It was saying
to people, `Why are you wasting that money on Bell?'"

After Rogers acquired Microcell last fall to become the country's largest
wireless provider, it surprised analysts by going ahead with the launch of
CityFido in Montreal. It did, however, slightly increase the monthly cost and
hinted that bigger changes were likely to come.

Beginning March 1, the redesigned CityFido will be sold as two plans, both
"smaller in size and more urban-focused," said Rogers.

The first offers 750 minutes for $45 a month; the second offers 1,500 minutes
for $65. Each plan's local coverage area has been greatly reduced, and calls
made outside the local zone will cost 50 cents a minute.

"It's pricey," said Sharwood, pointing out that the 50 cent a minute charge for
calls outside the local calling zone harkens back to cellular prices of the late
1980s and those large bricklike phones.

"And it's nice to know they understand urban lifestyle needs. Apparently those
needs were not met by an unlimited plan."

Rogers said the system access fee, local number portability, as well as call
waiting, call forwarding and conference call services will continue to be
included in both plans. Calls that exceed minute caps will cost an additional 30
cents a minute.

Existing CityFido customers will be protected from the changes for a year or
until the end of their service agreements, Rogers said.

Quigley said the decision, while it makes good business sense for Rogers and its
shareholders, is going to anger many CityFido subscribers who, after the effort
of liberating themselves from their local phone company, will face paying more
or going back to Bell.

Analysts also pointed out that the changes benefit Virgin Mobile Canada, which
is planning to launch mobile phone services any week now and is expected to
aggressively target disgruntled wireless users.

"This will fall into their hands," said Sharwood. "They'll be like, `You've been
lied to again, come to us.' "

- ---
Norman
Please reply via group. E-mail ID does not exist.
19 answers Last reply
More about rogers wireless curbs fido unit
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    Wow. From 'unlimited' to 750mins, added monthly service fee, reduced
    coverage, 50 cent/min roaming. I guess the government really knew what
    they were doing when they figured that competition wouldn't be affected
    by this merger. And they wonder why people are against bank mergers (I
    canceled my Canada Trust account after the TD merger because my promised
    'no fee changes' had my montly fees go from $3 to $11). And don't get
    us started on the raging success of merging Canada's only two major
    airlines.

    Back to the topic: The thing about Virgin Mobile is that, from what
    little I've read, they won't be offereing GSM service, so it's really no
    help to disgruntled Rogers/Fido customers. I, as well as many others I
    would suspect, liked having GSM service because I could use my triband
    mobile when travelling. A Virgin Mobile reselling Bell Mobility won't
    help me.

    Norman wrote:
    > I'm surprised nobody's posted this yet.
    >
    > http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1106779811499&call_pageid=970599119419
    >
    > Jan. 27, 2005. 01:00 AM
    >
    > Rogers Wireless curbs Fido unit
    > `Redesign' raises calling costs
    >
    > Two new plans starting in March
    >
    > TYLER HAMILTON
    > TECHNOLOGY REPORTER
    > Toronto Star
    >
    > Rogers Wireless Inc. has put Fido on a shorter leash less than three months
    > after acquiring its master, Microcell Telecommunications Inc., by upping the
    > cost, capping the talk time and shrinking the coverage of its "unlimited"
    > CityFido plan.
    >
    > Analysts said the changes, what Rogers is calling a "redesign," signal that
    > competition in Canada's wireless industry is beginning to cool off as the three
    > service providers left in the market put more emphasis on profits than
    > subscriber growth.
    >
    > The situation stands in contrast with the U.S. market, where wireless plans
    > generally offer more value for less money.
    >
    > "The bad thing about all of this is we're going to get back to where the
    > carriers are very conservative," said Mark Quigley, Canadian managing director
    > for the Yankee Group, a technology research firm.
    >
    > "The Canadian carriers definitely have not been as aggressive on the price side
    > as they have been in the U.S. market. From a consumer's perspective it certainly
    > is a shot."
    >
    > CityFido created a stir when it was first introduced because it offered
    > unlimited local calls for just $45, including the $6.95 monthly system access
    > fee its rivals routinely charge. Montreal-based Microcell promoted the
    > controversial plan as a replacement for traditional local-phone services
    > provided by Telus Corp. and Bell Canada.
    >
    > When it was introduced in Vancouver in late 2003 and in Toronto last May, the
    > flat-rate plan sparked pricing battles in each market as Bell and Telus moved to
    > defend their respective turfs.
    >
    > "What CityFido was trying to do was get rid of that local phone," said Brian
    > Sharwood, a telecom analyst with the Seaboard Group in Toronto. "It was saying
    > to people, `Why are you wasting that money on Bell?'"
    >
    > After Rogers acquired Microcell last fall to become the country's largest
    > wireless provider, it surprised analysts by going ahead with the launch of
    > CityFido in Montreal. It did, however, slightly increase the monthly cost and
    > hinted that bigger changes were likely to come.
    >
    > Beginning March 1, the redesigned CityFido will be sold as two plans, both
    > "smaller in size and more urban-focused," said Rogers.
    >
    > The first offers 750 minutes for $45 a month; the second offers 1,500 minutes
    > for $65. Each plan's local coverage area has been greatly reduced, and calls
    > made outside the local zone will cost 50 cents a minute.
    >
    > "It's pricey," said Sharwood, pointing out that the 50 cent a minute charge for
    > calls outside the local calling zone harkens back to cellular prices of the late
    > 1980s and those large bricklike phones.
    >
    > "And it's nice to know they understand urban lifestyle needs. Apparently those
    > needs were not met by an unlimited plan."
    >
    > Rogers said the system access fee, local number portability, as well as call
    > waiting, call forwarding and conference call services will continue to be
    > included in both plans. Calls that exceed minute caps will cost an additional 30
    > cents a minute.
    >
    > Existing CityFido customers will be protected from the changes for a year or
    > until the end of their service agreements, Rogers said.
    >
    > Quigley said the decision, while it makes good business sense for Rogers and its
    > shareholders, is going to anger many CityFido subscribers who, after the effort
    > of liberating themselves from their local phone company, will face paying more
    > or going back to Bell.
    >
    > Analysts also pointed out that the changes benefit Virgin Mobile Canada, which
    > is planning to launch mobile phone services any week now and is expected to
    > aggressively target disgruntled wireless users.
    >
    > "This will fall into their hands," said Sharwood. "They'll be like, `You've been
    > lied to again, come to us.' "
    >
    > - ---
    > Norman
    > Please reply via group. E-mail ID does not exist.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    sbdot wrote:
    > Back to the topic: The thing about Virgin Mobile is that, from what
    > little I've read, they won't be offereing GSM service, so it's really no
    > help to disgruntled Rogers/Fido customers.

    Unfortunatly, the majority of customers don't know the difference
    between CDMA and GSM. And they are used to the fact that changing
    carriers requires changing handsets.

    Come to think of it, Rogers's move to sabotage Fido at this point in
    time may not be so stupid. If removing all the good packages from the
    market now means that Virgin will be able to price their packages
    higher, it is good for Rogers, Bell, Telus.

    If Fido were allowed to retain their competitive pricing, it means that
    Virgin would match them. And then, when Rogers would remove those
    packages, Virgin would end up with a clear pricing advantage over all
    the others.

    So this is in fact reverse comnpetition where people raise their rates
    so that the new entrant won't offer very low rates, and the legacy
    carriers can then afford to lower their rates to appear to be competing
    against the new entrant. (a bit like raising price of items and the next
    day announcing a sale that brings the price back to what it use dto be).
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    I will be calling to cancel my fido account at the end of this billing
    cycle. I have a pretty sweet deal, but the service is noticeably
    deteriorating in my area and I suspect that my fees are going to
    increase shortly. The only question that I have is what if anything I
    can do about keeping my number. I haven't been keeping up, but what's
    the deal with number portability as it stands now? I could opt to
    switch to prepaid until I manage to get in touch with everyone I would
    want to communicate a new number to, but that would be giving Rogers
    something every month. I want them to get nary a nickel from me, seeing
    as they don't deserve it.

    JF Mezei wrote:
    > sbdot wrote:
    >
    >>Back to the topic: The thing about Virgin Mobile is that, from what
    >>little I've read, they won't be offereing GSM service, so it's really no
    >>help to disgruntled Rogers/Fido customers.
    >
    >
    > Unfortunatly, the majority of customers don't know the difference
    > between CDMA and GSM. And they are used to the fact that changing
    > carriers requires changing handsets.
    >
    > Come to think of it, Rogers's move to sabotage Fido at this point in
    > time may not be so stupid. If removing all the good packages from the
    > market now means that Virgin will be able to price their packages
    > higher, it is good for Rogers, Bell, Telus.
    >
    > If Fido were allowed to retain their competitive pricing, it means that
    > Virgin would match them. And then, when Rogers would remove those
    > packages, Virgin would end up with a clear pricing advantage over all
    > the others.
    >
    > So this is in fact reverse comnpetition where people raise their rates
    > so that the new entrant won't offer very low rates, and the legacy
    > carriers can then afford to lower their rates to appear to be competing
    > against the new entrant. (a bit like raising price of items and the next
    > day announcing a sale that brings the price back to what it use dto be).
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    sbdot wrote:
    >
    > I will be calling to cancel my fido account at the end of this billing
    > cycle. I have a pretty sweet deal, but the service is noticeably
    > deteriorating in my area and I suspect that my fees are going to
    > increase shortly. ... I want them to get nary a nickel from me, seeing
    > as they don't deserve it.

    While I also dislike Rogers, and deplore the disapearance of Fido, until
    I find a better deal than what I currently have, I have to bite my
    tongue and keep paying what is now rogers.

    When Fido comes to me and tells me my deal is finished and I must eother
    get a 2 year contract or see a hige price increase, then I will shop
    around to see what is available. The day Fido introduced contracts, they
    lost something which was very valuable: loyalty.

    They used to have the lowest churn rate, until the period where they
    started messing up SMS, web site, email etc. They went to one with the
    highest churn rate.

    Note: from what I have read, the GRPS offering on Ragers is 2 tiered.
    There is a low end GPRS services that gives you just WAP and no IP
    address visible to the internet, and the full services which gives you a
    routable IP address which you can use from laptop. i.e. the base one is
    really just for WAP and possibly retrieve/send email from handset, the
    second tier, much more expensive, is for what we get here on Fido: real
    GPRS service.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    A friend of mine is a CSR for Fido (he's the one who talked me into
    joining Fido a year ago.) I passed this news item along to him and his
    comments were:


    - Virgin will be offering a pay-as-you-go service.


    - Rogers is trying to "annoy" Fido customers into leaving the CityFido
    plans and switch to capped roaming plans. Fido customers on unlimited
    plans are now sharing their towers with Rogers customers, congesting
    their network. Conversly, Fido customers on capped plans are now
    roaming on Rogers' towers, escaping that congestion.
    I can't verify any of this, btw. :-)


    - he mirrored JF's comments about Rogers eventually using Fido to
    'counter-attack' Virgin


    I came to Fido to escape Rogers after two years of being treated like
    an annoyance by their CSRs. Now I'm back in bed with them. At least
    I'm not locked into a contract. As soon as I see Rogers trying to hike
    my bill, I'm done. I think I'll drop using cell phones altogether until
    something more appealling (and not Rogers, Bell or Telus) comes along.
    I don't mean to sound like I'm pinning my hopes on Virgin, but hey - I
    saw a little of Rebel Billionaire and Branson seems like a decent guy. ;-)


    ttyl,
    Amur_
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    Amur_ wrote:
    > - Rogers is trying to "annoy" Fido customers into leaving the CityFido
    > plans and switch to capped roaming plans. Fido customers on unlimited
    > plans are now sharing their towers with Rogers customers, congesting
    > their network.

    This would need more explanation. None of the unlimited currently sue
    Rogers network. But Rogers customers can use Fido's network.

    My guess is that Fido wants to transfer 1900 spectrum from Fido towers
    to Rogers towers so that Rogers can grow. The spectrum was Fido's most
    valuable asset. But Rogers can't really transfer that spectrum if it is
    still being used.

    I guess that the thinking is that if 2 cityfido customers take up as
    much bandwidth as 3 Rogers customers, and total revenus from the 3
    Rogers customers is higher, then it would pay to get rid of the CityFido
    customers to free up the bandwdith, transfer it to Rogers and then grow Rogers.

    > Conversly, Fido customers on capped plans are now
    > roaming on Rogers' towers, escaping that congestion.

    Correct. But this will end at end of February, except for those paying
    an extra $5.00 per month.

    > - he mirrored JF's comments about Rogers eventually using Fido to
    > 'counter-attack' Virgin

    That would leave fido only for pre-paid stuff. Which was my prediction
    from the start: the Fido name will become a product name for Roger's prepaid.


    > I came to Fido to escape Rogers after two years of being treated like
    > an annoyance by their CSRs.

    I came from Cantel because they were too expensive compared to Fido and
    wanted 3 year contracts at $26 for 30 minutes (billed per minute) while
    Fido wanted $20 for 100 minutes, billed by second, and Fido had GSM
    whilst Rogers was still analogue. And Cantel was renamed to AT&T, and
    they wouldn't even give me a deal on a replacement battery for my Moto
    handset which I had paid $1200 in the early 1990s.

    Lots of the early Fido adopters have similar stories. But Fido now has a
    large percentage of its cutsomer base who are first time mobile phone
    users and don't really know much about Rogers.

    > I'm not locked into a contract. As soon as I see Rogers trying to hike
    > my bill, I'm done. I think I'll drop using cell phones altogether until
    > something more appealling


    A lot of us would love to be able to do that. But in the end, Rogers
    knows full well that as long as its package is $0.xx cheaper than Bell
    or Telus, that it is still better to stick with Rogers.
    (The $0.xx is the magic value which Rogers must very carefully evaluate
    in order to make the price advbantage bigger than the psychocolocal need
    to give Rogers a kick on the ass for ruining Fido.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    > I don't mean to sound like I'm pinning my hopes on Virgin, but hey - I
    > saw a little of Rebel Billionaire and Branson seems like a decent guy.
    ;-)

    He is a Billionaire, he is out to make money by maximizing his brand in the
    marketplace, thus building more wealth. The plan, as with any business in a
    capitalist society, is to make money, he does a good job. As does Ted
    Rogers.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    malingerer@gmail.com wrote:
    > He is a Billionaire, he is out to make money by maximizing his brand in the
    > marketplace, thus building more wealth. The plan, as with any business in a
    > capitalist society, is to make money, he does a good job. As does Ted
    > Rogers.

    There is a significant difference. Branson is also out to beat old style
    stuffy establishment. He has attacked British Airways constantly since
    he started Virgin Atlantic (airline).

    The thing is that Branson's enteprises are designed to appear to be low
    cost, but aren't in fact that low cost. But the marketing is excellent
    and makes customers feel really good and happy to shop/use Virgin services.

    Had the "Fido" brand not been so strong, Microcell would gave been a
    perfect fit for Virgin Mobile. (forgetting foreign investment rules for
    a minute). In fact, Branson might have been able to return Microcell to
    its pre 2000 mentality.

    Ted Rogers is more like Conrad Black than Branson. He is out to build an
    empire. He doesn't care about making customers like him, he knows that
    he is despised and he doesn't mind. He views customers as a necessary
    evil.

    Remember that from a mobile point of view, Rogers has a very weak brand
    because of the constant name changes over the years, combined with the
    bad image Rogers has for its cable operations.

    Virgin should have an easy time with its marketing gimmicks to steal
    lots of customers. If I were Branson, I'd even consider using an airship
    with a big Virgin logo on it and parade it over many cities. That would
    really rub it in for Rogers.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    <malingerer@gmail.com> wrote in alt.cellular.fido:

    > He is a Billionaire, he is out to make money by maximizing his brand
    > in the marketplace, thus building more wealth. The plan, as with any
    > business in a capitalist society, is to make money, he does a good
    > job. As does Ted Rogers.

    No matter what any of these people make. I am not addicted to my phone. I
    have a pager that costs me $6.00 with voicemail. I am more than happy to
    stick with that as there is always a phone around.

    --
    Mason Storm

    -----------------------------
    Remove "dogface" to reply privately in email.
    -----------------------------
    http://ciudad.latinol.com//boinks/booters.html
  10. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    Anyone know how we can complain? Who do we complain to? the CRTC? is
    there a competition bureau or some sort of government agency that we can
    complain to?


    "Norman" <user@node.domain> wrote in message
    news:fdaiv0lqje6d5dp7i8ehl73rpolbm8mnon@4ax.com...
    > I'm surprised nobody's posted this yet.
    >
    > http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1106779811499&call_pageid=970599119419
    >
    > Jan. 27, 2005. 01:00 AM
    >
    > Rogers Wireless curbs Fido unit
    > `Redesign' raises calling costs
    >
    > Two new plans starting in March
    >
    > TYLER HAMILTON
    > TECHNOLOGY REPORTER
    > Toronto Star
    >
    > Rogers Wireless Inc. has put Fido on a shorter leash less than three
    > months
    > after acquiring its master, Microcell Telecommunications Inc., by upping
    > the
    > cost, capping the talk time and shrinking the coverage of its "unlimited"
    > CityFido plan.
    >
    > Analysts said the changes, what Rogers is calling a "redesign," signal
    > that
    > competition in Canada's wireless industry is beginning to cool off as the
    > three
    > service providers left in the market put more emphasis on profits than
    > subscriber growth.
    >
    > The situation stands in contrast with the U.S. market, where wireless
    > plans
    > generally offer more value for less money.
    >
    > "The bad thing about all of this is we're going to get back to where the
    > carriers are very conservative," said Mark Quigley, Canadian managing
    > director
    > for the Yankee Group, a technology research firm.
    >
    > "The Canadian carriers definitely have not been as aggressive on the price
    > side
    > as they have been in the U.S. market. From a consumer's perspective it
    > certainly
    > is a shot."
    >
    > CityFido created a stir when it was first introduced because it offered
    > unlimited local calls for just $45, including the $6.95 monthly system
    > access
    > fee its rivals routinely charge. Montreal-based Microcell promoted the
    > controversial plan as a replacement for traditional local-phone services
    > provided by Telus Corp. and Bell Canada.
    >
    > When it was introduced in Vancouver in late 2003 and in Toronto last May,
    > the
    > flat-rate plan sparked pricing battles in each market as Bell and Telus
    > moved to
    > defend their respective turfs.
    >
    > "What CityFido was trying to do was get rid of that local phone," said
    > Brian
    > Sharwood, a telecom analyst with the Seaboard Group in Toronto. "It was
    > saying
    > to people, `Why are you wasting that money on Bell?'"
    >
    > After Rogers acquired Microcell last fall to become the country's largest
    > wireless provider, it surprised analysts by going ahead with the launch of
    > CityFido in Montreal. It did, however, slightly increase the monthly cost
    > and
    > hinted that bigger changes were likely to come.
    >
    > Beginning March 1, the redesigned CityFido will be sold as two plans, both
    > "smaller in size and more urban-focused," said Rogers.
    >
    > The first offers 750 minutes for $45 a month; the second offers 1,500
    > minutes
    > for $65. Each plan's local coverage area has been greatly reduced, and
    > calls
    > made outside the local zone will cost 50 cents a minute.
    >
    > "It's pricey," said Sharwood, pointing out that the 50 cent a minute
    > charge for
    > calls outside the local calling zone harkens back to cellular prices of
    > the late
    > 1980s and those large bricklike phones.
    >
    > "And it's nice to know they understand urban lifestyle needs. Apparently
    > those
    > needs were not met by an unlimited plan."
    >
    > Rogers said the system access fee, local number portability, as well as
    > call
    > waiting, call forwarding and conference call services will continue to be
    > included in both plans. Calls that exceed minute caps will cost an
    > additional 30
    > cents a minute.
    >
    > Existing CityFido customers will be protected from the changes for a year
    > or
    > until the end of their service agreements, Rogers said.
    >
    > Quigley said the decision, while it makes good business sense for Rogers
    > and its
    > shareholders, is going to anger many CityFido subscribers who, after the
    > effort
    > of liberating themselves from their local phone company, will face paying
    > more
    > or going back to Bell.
    >
    > Analysts also pointed out that the changes benefit Virgin Mobile Canada,
    > which
    > is planning to launch mobile phone services any week now and is expected
    > to
    > aggressively target disgruntled wireless users.
    >
    > "This will fall into their hands," said Sharwood. "They'll be like,
    > `You've been
    > lied to again, come to us.' "
    >
    > - ---
    > Norman
    > Please reply via group. E-mail ID does not exist.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    monkey cow moon wrote:
    >
    > Anyone know how we can complain? Who do we complain to? the CRTC? is
    > there a competition bureau or some sort of government agency that we can
    > complain to?

    Industry Canada is the body in charge of mobile phones. CRTC is useless
    to begin with and thankfully they don't regulate mobile phones (except
    for the number portability issue which is part of its jurisdiction over
    legacy landline carriers).

    From a political point of view, the Bloc and NDP are most likely to
    provide some opposition. The Reform party probably likes the
    disapearance of Microcell (Québec based) since it re-enforces their
    western based Telus.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    > Ted Rogers is more like Conrad Black than Branson. He is out to build an
    > empire. He doesn't care about making customers like him, he knows that
    > he is despised and he doesn't mind. He views customers as a necessary
    > evil.

    So.. Ted told you this? That he doesn't care? He has 19,000 employees
    contributing to Canadian society..
  13. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    I bet you if he could do it with 10, he would...

    It's all about profit, not giving back...

    Deep


    <malingerer@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:T7CKd.197390$Xk.179816@pd7tw3no...
    > > Ted Rogers is more like Conrad Black than Branson. He is out to build an
    > > empire. He doesn't care about making customers like him, he knows that
    > > he is despised and he doesn't mind. He views customers as a necessary
    > > evil.
    >
    > So.. Ted told you this? That he doesn't care? He has 19,000 employees
    > contributing to Canadian society..
    >
    >
  14. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    The dog's been neutered and also being experimented on. We all know
    what happens to animals when they do this. My guess is that City
    Fido will be dead within a few years. Here is some info on the latest
    changes for those who use it in the Vancouver area:

    "As of March 1, Surrey, Delta, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Pitt
    Meadows, Maple Ridge, Langley, Aldergrove, Mission, Abbotsford and
    Chilliwack will no longer be served by City Fido."


    http://www.canada.com/vancouver/vancouversun/news/business/story.html?id=f0d7d6a6-0933-4bbe-b857-51dd4bdee7e7
  15. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    Pavel wrote:
    > http://www.canada.com/vancouver/vancouversun/news/business/story.html?id=f0d7d6a6-0933-4bbe-b857-51dd4bdee7e7

    What I find interesting is that despite this, they still insist City
    Fido continues to exist.

    As if anyone is going to find a 5000 minute @ $45 plan to be the same as
    a 750 minute @ $45 plan.

    It is a bit like Via Rail calling a train "The Canadian" when it doesn't
    even use the same tracks or link the same cities as the real/original train.


    Had a brief look at the rogers site. Boy, we had it good with Fido.

    for 750 minutes, one has to pay $100 per month with Rogers. It si no
    wonder Rogers want to get rid of Fido rates ASAP. Note that Rogers
    charges between 0.20 and 0.25 cents per minute for minutes above on'e
    plan. So the $0.50 is a true ripoff if they really intend to charge this
    to Fido customers who choose "City Fido".


    The next step I guess is to roll out Wi-Max, and provide mobile
    IP-telephony and watch that Rogers monster crumble.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    > The next step I guess is to roll out Wi-Max, and provide mobile
    > IP-telephony and watch that Rogers monster crumble.

    Ummm.. Wi-Max in Canada has already been secured by Microcell/Inukshuk
    (ifido trials earlier this year). License already provide to Microcell (now
    Rogers owned) in 8 out of 10 provinces.
    http://www.inukshuk.ca/anglais/offre.html is Wi-Max.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    On Sun, 30 Jan 2005 08:04:27 +0000, malingerer wrote:

    >> The next step I guess is to roll out Wi-Max, and provide mobile
    >> IP-telephony and watch that Rogers monster crumble.
    >
    > Ummm.. Wi-Max in Canada has already been secured by Microcell/Inukshuk
    > (ifido trials earlier this year). License already provide to Microcell
    > (now Rogers owned) in 8 out of 10 provinces.
    > http://www.inukshuk.ca/anglais/offre.html is Wi-Max.

    Ahh, you just ruined JF's dreams of some little company coming to his
    rescue...

    That said, WiMax is a protocol that can run on MANY different frequencies,
    licensed or not. By the time it does come out developing a WiMax network
    will be VERY cheap, so there will be alot of players.

    Hopefully the Canadian government won't do what they do best: protect the
    interests of the big companies without concern for how much we the
    consumer are being screwed.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    malingerer@gmail.com wrote:
    > Ummm.. Wi-Max in Canada has already been secured by Microcell/Inukshuk
    > (ifido trials earlier this year). License already provide to Microcell (now
    > Rogers owned) in 8 out of 10 provinces.
    > http://www.inukshuk.ca/anglais/offre.html is Wi-Max.

    When did ifido change its infrastructure from the proprietary technology
    to wimax ? At the time ifido was setup, Wi-Max didn't exist, I am not
    even sure if the standard has been officially adopted yet.


    And are you sure Inukshuk was actually purchased by Rogers ?
  19. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

    > > Ummm.. Wi-Max in Canada has already been secured by Microcell/Inukshuk
    > > (ifido trials earlier this year). License already provide to Microcell
    (now
    > > Rogers owned) in 8 out of 10 provinces.
    > > http://www.inukshuk.ca/anglais/offre.html is Wi-Max.
    >
    > When did ifido change its infrastructure from the proprietary technology
    > to wimax ? At the time ifido was setup, Wi-Max didn't exist, I am not
    > even sure if the standard has been officially adopted yet.
    >
    > And are you sure Inukshuk was actually purchased by Rogers ?

    MCS was the technology now called Wi-Max. Inukshuk control is fully on the
    Rogers side now. Not even within FIDO's house anymore.
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