Question about discharging a monitor

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade.collecting (More info?)

I read (and reread) numerous posts on this and other sights and decided
I was ready to give it a try. I have a Donkey Kong that I want to
replace the monitor on. The game has been unplugged for a few days. I
used a screwdriver with lamp cord attached to the frame as described in
the other posts. When I slip the screwdriver under the rubber I got no
snap crackle or pop! How do I know if the monitor is truly discharged?
I really do not want to give my wife the pleasure of burying me just
yet! LOL
9 answers Last reply
More about question discharging monitor
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade.collecting (More info?)

    Always best to be cautious! Personally I would wait a few minutes
    after my initial attempt and try again. Under the suction cup thing
    there are a couple of metal prongs that you need to make contact with
    in order to make sure the monitor is being discharged (if you didn't
    already know that) I know some people can use the end of the
    screwdriver to actually remove the clips from the tube, which probably
    makes things a little safer. It certainly doesn't hurt that you left
    the monitor sit for a few days, that could be why you didn't hear a
    pop. Are you replacing the whole monitor or just doing a tube swap?
    Although this has been a topic of much debate, you probably won't make
    your wife a widow even if something goes wrong, but it sure doesn't
    feel good to get "bit" by one of those things!
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade.collecting (More info?)

    I am replacing the whole thing with a working setup from another game.
    Is it safe to pull the rubber boot off by hand? I have a pair of heavy
    duty insulated gloves that I have been wearing.
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade.collecting (More info?)

    kaz1961 wrote:
    > I read (and reread) numerous posts on this and other sights and decided
    > I was ready to give it a try. I have a Donkey Kong that I want to
    > replace the monitor on. The game has been unplugged for a few days. I
    > used a screwdriver with lamp cord attached to the frame as described in
    > the other posts. When I slip the screwdriver under the rubber I got no
    > snap crackle or pop! How do I know if the monitor is truly discharged?
    > I really do not want to give my wife the pleasure of burying me just
    > yet! LOL

    Most raster monitors slowly bleed off HV by themselves over time. Some
    vector monitors do not.

    Provided you hooked up your cobbled together discharger correctly, it
    should be discharged.

    If you are not sure, power the game (and monitor) up, then turn it off &
    unplug. Now attempt a discharge, you should hear a snap, wait a minute
    or two and discharge again, you may hear a couple of small crackles or
    nothing. Monitor should be discharged.

    I strongly recommend purchasing an HV probe (w/ integrated meter). eBay
    has them cheap, $20 or so. It is a great tool for monitor diagnostics
    and discharging.


    --
    Bret Pehrson
    bret@classicade.com

    Classicade
    http://www.classicade.com
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade.collecting (More info?)

    I've discharged a few monitors in my day, and only once gotten one to pop.
    After a few days, most monitors are designed to loose enough charge not to
    be so harmful. I would still be cautious though, and definitely remove the
    suction cup with the same screwdriver if you can. The day you loose respect
    for your good friend electricity, is the day it looses respect for you......
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade.collecting (More info?)

    You're probably right, but I always say it's better to be safe than
    sorry. Never know when you're pulling that thing out what you might
    accidentally grab! I figure you might as well do it, since it only
    takes a few seconds to do.
  6. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade.collecting (More info?)

    Discharging is easy. I used to be jumpy about the idea, but I've done
    it so much that now it's a piece of cake. See here:
    http://www.arcadegames.net/sightsound/discharge.ppt

    If you discharge your monitor immediately after it's been on, you'll
    hear almost definitely hear a pop. If you wait a minute and do it
    again, you might hear a small crackle.

    If the monitor has been off for a while, you likely won't hear anything
    at all. Don't worry, it's still likely discharged.
  7. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade.collecting (More info?)

    Ater you discharge the monitor continue with the flat blade screw
    driver and push the spring metal in and lift the rubber cap up and pull
    it off.

    RJ
  8. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade.collecting (More info?)

    Why are you even trying to discharge an old dead if you're replacing the
    whole monitor? There's no point in doing that.

    "kaz1961" <ssekaz@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1123861390.960760.118240@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >I am replacing the whole thing with a working setup from another game.
    > Is it safe to pull the rubber boot off by hand? I have a pair of heavy
    > duty insulated gloves that I have been wearing.
    >
  9. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade.collecting (More info?)

    I have gotten hit off a monitor that was not used in 3 months. They can
    hold there charge for a very long time. Always discharge them before
    disconecting the high voltage lead. Ted
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