Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Installing new motherboard need help

Last response: in Windows XP
Share
June 18, 2005 10:09:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

At present I am running a Asus mother board with Pentium II 350 MHz, but
want to upgrade to a Pentium IV. I have WindowsXP Home with lots of programs
and everything is working great. I Image my C drive every week with Acronis
True Image and want to put my OS and files back to where they were before
the mother board change. I understand I need to use Sysprep.exe, but have no
idea how to make this change without loosing everything including OS. I have
extracted Sysprep.exe and have it on a floppy. Will the new mother board be
recognized by XP?. How do I use Sysprep? Any help would be appreciated.
Jack

More about : installing motherboard

June 19, 2005 12:27:17 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

"Jack" <jmalone@intergate.com> wrote in message
news:11b9hdtk4prgrac@corp.supernews.com...
> At present I am running a Asus mother board with Pentium II 350 MHz,
> but want to upgrade to a Pentium IV. I have WindowsXP Home with lots
> of programs and everything is working great. I Image my C drive every
> week with Acronis True Image and want to put my OS and files back to
> where they were before the mother board change. I understand I need to
> use Sysprep.exe, but have no idea how to make this change without
> loosing everything including OS. I have extracted Sysprep.exe and have
> it on a floppy. Will the new mother board be recognized by XP?. How do
> I use Sysprep? Any help would be appreciated.
> Jack
>
>


Your image won't work after restoring it because the motherboard
changed. You can try saving the image (with the old motherboard), swap
out the motherboard, restore the image (using bootable rescue floppies
or the image CDs since the first one might be bootable), and then reboot
and use the bootable Windows installation CD to perform a Repair to get
the OS to use the new motherboard. However, you will probably still
have to install the mobo-specific chipset driver package (if it's not an
Intel mobo). In this scenario, SysPrep is not used (nor do I think it
accomodates changes in motherboards since you would instead use a
different image with SysPrep that matched the hardware to which you were
installing the OS).
June 19, 2005 4:06:57 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

> "Jack" <jmalone@intergate.com> wrote in message
> news:11b9hdtk4prgrac@corp.supernews.com...
>> At present I am running a Asus mother board with Pentium II 350 MHz, but
>> want to upgrade to a Pentium IV. I have WindowsXP Home with lots of
>> programs and everything is working great. I Image my C drive every week
>> with Acronis True Image and want to put my OS and files back to where
>> they were before the mother board change. I understand I need to use
>> Sysprep.exe, but have no idea how to make this change without loosing
>> everything including OS. I have extracted Sysprep.exe and have it on a
>> floppy. Will the new mother board be recognized by XP?. How do I use
>> Sysprep? Any help would be appreciated.
>> Jack



"Vanguard" <Vangu@rd.invalid> wrote in message
news:o lG9I4GdFHA.3040@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Your image won't work after restoring it because the motherboard changed.
> You can try saving the image (with the old motherboard), swap out the
> motherboard, restore the image (using bootable rescue floppies or the
> image CDs since the first one might be bootable), and then reboot and use
> the bootable Windows installation CD to perform a Repair to get the OS to
> use the new motherboard. However, you will probably still have to install
> the mobo-specific chipset driver package (if it's not an Intel mobo). In
> this scenario, SysPrep is not used (nor do I think it accomodates changes
> in motherboards since you would instead use a different image with SysPrep
> that matched the hardware to which you were installing the OS).


Jack:
As Vanguard has pointed out, a simple change of motherboards does not call
for the sysprep procedure. After you install your new motherboard including
whatever drivers are necessary, it's possible the system *will* boot without
further ado. There's no way that I know of to tell you if it will, but in a
fair number of cases we have found the system will boot following a
motherboard change without the need of a Repair install. Understand that the
Activation process will probably still be necessary in this situation
although even here it's not a certainty.

But the likelihood is that you will have to perform a Repair install as
Vanguard has indicated. It's a relatively simple process and is usually
effective. If you don't know how to undertake a Repair install, do a Google
search on this topic and you'll find a number of sites that give
step-by-step instructions. Make sure you back up any important or critical
files before undertaking the Repair install.

There is, however, an alternate process that doesn't entail the Repair
install that you may wish to consider re your motherboard change...

Here are the general steps, but refer to
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;824125 for the
precise details:
1. In your present machine with the old motherboard, start Windows.
2. After the system boots, insert your XP installation CD in your CD/DVD-ROM
drive.
3. In the Windows Setup window, click "Upgrade (Recommended)" in the
"Installation Type" list and click Next.
4. Follow the screen instructions until the computer begins to restart.
5. Just as the computer begins to restart, power down the computer.
6. Remove the old motherboard and install the new one.
7. Power up the computer. The "upgrade" will continue.
8. After the "upgrade" has completed, you will, of course, need to install
any motherboard drivers as well as hotfixes previously installed and any
service packs. Activation will also be possibly needed.

We've had a limited amount of experience with the above procedure and it
seems to work just fine.
Anna
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
June 19, 2005 1:14:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

Jack wrote:
> At present I am running a Asus mother board with Pentium II 350 MHz, but
> want to upgrade to a Pentium IV. I have WindowsXP Home with lots of programs
> and everything is working great. I Image my C drive every week with Acronis
> True Image and want to put my OS and files back to where they were before
> the mother board change. I understand I need to use Sysprep.exe, but have no
> idea how to make this change without loosing everything including OS. I have
> extracted Sysprep.exe and have it on a floppy. Will the new mother board be
> recognized by XP?. How do I use Sysprep? Any help would be appreciated.
> Jack
>
>


Normally, and assuming a retail license (many OEM installations are
not transferable to a new motherboard - check yours before starting),
unless the new motherboard is virtually identical (same chipset, same
IDE controllers, same BIOS version, etc.) to the one on which the WinXP
installation was originally performed, you'll need to perform a repair
(a.k.a. in-place upgrade) installation, at the very least:

How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade of Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/directory/article.asp?ID=K...;EN-US;Q315341

The "why" is quite simple, really, and has nothing to do with
licensing issues, per se; it's a purely technical matter, at this point.
You've pulled the proverbial hardware rug out from under the OS. (If
you don't like -- or get -- the rug analogy, think of it as picking up a
Cape Cod style home and then setting it down onto a Ranch style
foundation. It just isn't going to fit.) WinXP, like Win2K before it,
is not nearly as "promiscuous" as Win9x when it comes to accepting any
old hardware configuration you throw at it. On installation it
"tailors" itself to the specific hardware found. This is one of the
reasons that the entire WinNT/2K/XP OS family is so much more stable
than the Win9x group.

As always when undertaking such a significant change, back up any
important data before starting.

This will also probably require re-activation, unless you have a
Volume Licensed version of WinXP Pro installed. If it's been more than
120 days since you last activated that specific Product Key, you'll most
likely be able to activate via the Internet without problem. If it's
been less, you might have to make a 5 minute phone call.


--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
both at once. - RAH
!