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Can't use the beta anymore...

Last response: in Windows 7
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July 6, 2010 9:03:00 PM

I have to fork over the bucks and get a legitimate version of Windows 7. Anyway, how should I go about transferring data? If I copy a program file over will I have to re-enter the CD key?

More about : beta anymore

July 6, 2010 9:18:32 PM

You should be able to just put in the new/bought Win7 license key. What program file are you transferring from to?
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 1:44:21 AM

Orac said:
You should be able to just put in the new/bought Win7 license key. What program file are you transferring from to?


He might have to do an in place upgrade if he has the actual beta. If he is using the RTM, then the key should definitely do the job. In either case, he should be able to keep his current setup.
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 3:03:25 AM

The beta is not upgradeable - you'll need to do a complete reinstall. You should be able to back up all your data using "Windows Easy Transfer" and then restore it to the new machine.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 3:05:18 AM

sminlal said:
The beta is not upgradeable - you'll need to do a complete reinstall. You should be able to back up all your data using "Windows Easy Transfer" and then restore it to the new machine.


Assuming its not the RTM. The RTM was out in July, 3 months before the official release.
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 3:14:38 AM

The RTM is the official release. It doesn't expire, so there shouldn't be any issues with it unless the OP simply hasn't ever entered a key for it.

If there's a version number in the lower-right corner of the desktop then it's the beta, otherwise it's the RTM.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 3:18:54 AM

sminlal said:
The RTM is the official release. It doesn't expire, so there shouldn't be any issues with it unless the OP simply hasn't ever entered a key for it.

If there's a version number in the lower-right corner of the desktop then it's the beta, otherwise it's the RTM.


My understanding is that the RTM went out before the official release and those copies would deactivate 6 months after the official release. I know I had the RTM in July.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 3:38:22 AM

sminlal said:
The beta is not upgradeable - you'll need to do a complete reinstall. You should be able to back up all your data using "Windows Easy Transfer" and then restore it to the new machine.



The Beta is indeed upgradeable, as long as you are going to upgrade to Ultimate, it is simple. However you can downgrade to other editions as well.

Here is a tutorial on how it is done. I just tried it yesterday and it worked perfect. All my files and Apps remained in perfect condition.

http://tech.icrontic.com/articles/upgrade-the-windows-7...


You are right the RTM stands for released to manufacturer, and it is what is in stores.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 3:46:29 AM

FALC0N said:
My understanding is that the RTM went out before the official release and those copies would deactivate 6 months after the official release. I know I had the RTM in July.


You had the RTM in July because thats when technet and MSDN subscribers got it, and it was leaked to the WWW. It is the full meal deal.
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 4:35:07 AM

FALC0N said:
My understanding is that the RTM went out before the official release and those copies would deactivate 6 months after the official release. I know I had the RTM in July.
"RTM" stands for "Release to Manufacturing". It's the first official release of the operating system, and people with Enterprise agreements, Technet or MSDN subscriptions, etc. get it very quickly because there isn't any actual "manufacturing" to be done other than posting it to Microsoft's web sites where it can be downloaded. OEMs (such as Dell, HP, etc.) also get it quickly so that they can start the process of integrating it into their manufacturing lines.

The "retail" copy was available a few months after the RTM date because it takes time to manufacture the discs and packaging and get it through the channels to the retail stores in enough volume so that there's enough inventory to meet the expected demand. But it's the same code that was in the RTM version available from download sites.
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 4:37:22 AM

daship said:
The Beta is indeed upgradeable, as long as you are going to upgrade to Ultimate, it is simple. However you can downgrade to other editions as well.
You can follow that procedure, but it's not officially supported by Microsoft and some people have had issues with it. So use with caution...
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 4:50:54 AM

sminlal said:
"RTM" stands for "Release to Manufacturing". It's the first official release of the operating system, and people with Enterprise agreements, Technet or MSDN subscriptions, etc. get it very quickly because there isn't any actual "manufacturing" to be done other than posting it to Microsoft's web sites where it can be downloaded. OEMs (such as Dell, HP, etc.) also get it quickly so that they can start the process of integrating it into their manufacturing lines.

The "retail" copy was available a few months after the RTM date because it takes time to manufacture the discs and packaging and get it through the channels to the retail stores in enough volume so that there's enough inventory to meet the expected demand. But it's the same code that was in the RTM version available from download sites.


I know what an RTM is. That doesn't answer my question. And its more than a manufacturing issue as MS could have sold it online had they chosen to.

So the question stands, were the pre-release RTM copies time limited?
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 4:54:33 AM

daship said:
You had the RTM in July because thats when technet and MSDN subscribers got it, and it was leaked to the WWW. It is the full meal deal.


MSDN and technet are full retail licenses or only good as long as your a member?
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 5:30:34 AM

FALC0N said:
MSDN and technet are full retail licenses or only good as long as your a member?




I dont believe MSDN licenses expire, but I know for a fact that technet does not.

RTM is exactly the same as retail.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 5:52:15 AM

daship said:
I dont believe MSDN licenses expire, but I know for a fact that technet does not.

RTM is exactly the same as retail.


Thank you.

And for the 10th time, I know what an RTM is. That doesn't mean they were using the same licenses.
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July 7, 2010 6:38:42 AM

Being a Technet Professional subscriber which was Technet Plus subscriber, the licenses do not expire even after your subscription expires. You have full retail keys.
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 8:46:40 AM

FALC0N said:
And for the 10th time, I know what an RTM is. That doesn't mean they were using the same licenses.
Sorry, you specifically used "RTM" in your question, so that's the answer you got. RTM is the code, and the code is the same no matter what license you have. There was no "pre-release" in the sense you're probably thinking of, only a staged release schedule that allowed people who had agreements with Microsoft to get copies of the same software earlier than it was generally available in stores.

In licensing terms, what you get depends entirely on what kind of license you purchase. Technet gives you "Retail" licenses which are non-expiring keys that function identically to the ones you get with the retail (i.e., non "OEM") product. Large businesses can negotiate a volume license agreement with Microsoft and are given Volume License Keys (VLKs), a single key per product which can activate as many products as the corporation decides to purchase. MSDN keys are either Retail or VL keys, depending on the product. MSDN-AA (Academic Alliance) keys can have slightly different terms and conditions, see here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-ca/subscriptions/cc137104....

In actual fact the volume license versions of the software can be from different builds, but they come from the same code base so there really isn't anything different about them other than how they're activated. They don't expire either.

There really aren't any licenses I'm aware of that technically expire. There are license terms that expire (for example, I'm only permitted to use products licensed by the company I work for on my home computer as long as I work for the company) - but there's nothing in the software that will cause it to stop working once it's been successfully activated.

The only "expiry" that you really get, at least with Windows 7, is if you install the product and do not enter a key and activate it. In that case you're essentially using it on a trial basis, and it will shut down after 90 days (extension to 120 days is possible). That applies to all editions of the Windows 7 RTM, as well as to previous versions of Windows (Vista, XP, etc.).

Microsoft can, of course, blacklist keys that they deem to have been compromised, but that's a different matter altogether.
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July 7, 2010 3:42:26 PM

Is it possible to upgrade if I can't actually use the beta anymore? My understanding was that after June 1st I could no longer even use the beta, and before that I had two hour usage periods before it kicked me off. What are the risks associated with the beta upgrade method?
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 4:32:33 PM

I'm pretty sure you can still boot and use the beta for an hour before it kicks you off. If you look at the response thread on the page daship linked to above you'll see some discussion of problems that occurred for some people.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 6:00:39 PM

sminlal said:


There really aren't any licenses I'm aware of that technically expire. There are license terms that expire (for example, I'm only permitted to use products licensed by the company I work for on my home computer as long as I work for the company) - but there's nothing in the software that will cause it to stop working once it's been successfully activated.

.


Some MS products need periodic reactivation using KMS servers. So they have done it. But not in this instance apparently.

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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 6:38:39 PM

FALC0N said:
Some MS products need periodic reactivation using KMS servers. So they have done it. But not in this instance apparently.


The ones that need KMS activation are VLK keys.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 7, 2010 7:27:22 PM

daship said:
The ones that need KMS activation are VLK keys.


Yes, I am just pointing out that they have done limited activation before.
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