Should I use neighbors' internet access?

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.

I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?
16 answers Last reply
More about should neighbors internet access
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Dave Buck wrote:
    > I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?
    Some people leave their wireless networks open intentionally -- inviting
    others to use the network. Others leave their networks open because they
    are either unaware of the fact or are uninformed on the methods to close
    access.

    The legal issues are unclear. See this article today on abcnews.com :
    http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/scitech/ZDM/wifi_legal_woes_pcmag_040422.html

    As a practical matter, you probably shouldn't use your neighbor's
    connection without your neighbor's permission. Your neighbor could
    become aware of your connection and politely ask you to stop. Or, she
    could perhaps send her 300 lb. husband Bubba over to enlighten you.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    By asking the question, you are demonstrating your better-than-average
    ethical values. Why not ask if you can pay to share that connection--it's
    the right thing to do.

    "Dave Buck" <dbmonkey@elvis.com> wrote in message
    news:5293147d.0404220959.68569c21@posting.google.com...
    > I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    It depends on your religion. Do you have one yet?

    "Dave Buck" <dbmonkey@elvis.com> wrote in message
    news:5293147d.0404220959.68569c21@posting.google.com...
    > I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    dbmonkey@elvis.com (Dave Buck) wrote in message news:<5293147d.0404220959.68569c21@posting.google.com>...
    > I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?

    Hi,

    Why don't you ask around and see if anyone wants to split the bill?
    Then you could set a WPA password on the network so only you two could
    share it.

    I wonder if more people share like this than I think.

    oj
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Mmmm.

    No. Here are the issues:

    #1. Your neighbor is paying and probably doesn't know that they are giving
    out service for free. You should ask them if they are doing this
    intentionally - setting up a "hot spot" for general use. If not, be a
    good soul and advise them to encrypt their wap. Maybe post a message on
    the laundry room door or by your mailbox area. Most apartment buildings
    have these things.

    #2. Remember, if you can use their connection - then they can sniff your
    packets as well. Do you really want your neighbors to be able to read data
    and requests flowing off your machine?

    Get your own connection, your own router and encrypt.

    I must live in a tech savvy neighborhood. All of the neighbors in my
    townhouse section have encryption on. Right along Silicon Valley East in
    Virginia.

    "Dave Buck" <dbmonkey@elvis.com> wrote in message
    news:5293147d.0404220959.68569c21@posting.google.com...
    >I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Dave Buck wrote:

    > I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?

    While you're Googling, look up "theft of service".

    --

    Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

    To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
    james.knott.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    In article <77d3a68b.0404221759.42cdd822@posting.google.com>,
    OJ <orljustin@aol.com> wrote:
    :Why don't you ask around and see if anyone wants to split the bill?
    :Then you could set a WPA password on the network so only you two could
    :share it.

    That approach can be quite good, but there's a thorn to watch out for:
    many (most) residental ISP contracts have clauses that are dead set
    against sharing the service with others, and are especially firm
    about not allowing you to "resell" the service. I had a look at some
    of the ISP contracts around here a couple of years ago: the wording
    on one of the major vendors was such that you couldn't even allow
    your direct family to use the ISP connection, even though "It's
    good for the whole family" was a major part of their advertisement
    campaign.

    If you allow someone (a friend, visitor, relative) to "share" your
    connection and the contract says you may not do so, then the usual
    consequence is a stiff reminder about the clause (if you are lucky),
    or a disconnection of service (with no refund for the rest of the
    prepaid term) "for cause" if you are less lucky. But if you
    "resell" the service, then chances increase that upon discovery
    the ISP will send you a bill or lawsuit for "liquidated damages"
    equivilent to their deemed "loss of income" under the assumption
    that the other parties would have paid at the full going rate if
    they hadn't been sharing with you. The argument that the other
    parties wouldn't have used the service at all, in such cases
    is likely to get you about as far as a collection agency or
    court summons, and no-where near a sympathetic ear.

    To put things another way: ISPs are businesses, and some ISPs are
    pretty hard-nosed businesses. If you actually -read- the Terms
    and Conditions and call the ISP up asking a question, and get
    a glacial "That's the way it is, and if you don't like it you
    can start your own ISP" response, then you can be fairly sure
    that that ISP is *not* interested in hearing what you have to say
    [other than "Yes, Sir, would it be acceptable if we bring the
    $10,000 'compensation' by the office this afternoon?"]
    --
    "Meme" is self-referential; memes exist if and only if the "meme" meme
    exists. "Meme" is thus logically a meta-meme; but until the existance
    of meta-memes is more widely recognized, "meta-meme" is not a meme.
    -- A Child's Garden Of Memes
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    roberson@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote in message news:<c6a7qd$ipd$1@canopus.cc.umanitoba.ca>...
    > In article <77d3a68b.0404221759.42cdd822@posting.google.com>,
    > OJ <orljustin@aol.com> wrote:
    > :Why don't you ask around and see if anyone wants to split the bill?
    > :Then you could set a WPA password on the network so only you two could
    > :share it.
    >
    > That approach can be quite good, but there's a thorn to watch out for:
    > many (most) residental ISP contracts have clauses that are dead set
    > against sharing the service with others, and are especially firm
    > about not allowing you to "resell" the service. I had a look at some
    > of the ISP contracts around here a couple of years ago: the wording
    > on one of the major vendors was such that you couldn't even allow
    > your direct family to use the ISP connection, even though "It's
    > good for the whole family" was a major part of their advertisement
    > campaign.
    >
    > If you allow someone (a friend, visitor, relative) to "share" your
    > connection and the contract says you may not do so, then the usual
    > consequence is a stiff reminder about the clause (if you are lucky),
    > or a disconnection of service (with no refund for the rest of the
    > prepaid term) "for cause" if you are less lucky.

    Hi,

    How would they even know? And how would that be different from
    someone who was just glomming onto your connection without your
    knowledge anyways?

    oj


    But if you
    > "resell" the service, then chances increase that upon discovery
    > the ISP will send you a bill or lawsuit for "liquidated damages"
    > equivilent to their deemed "loss of income" under the assumption
    > that the other parties would have paid at the full going rate if
    > they hadn't been sharing with you. The argument that the other
    > parties wouldn't have used the service at all, in such cases
    > is likely to get you about as far as a collection agency or
    > court summons, and no-where near a sympathetic ear.
    >
    > To put things another way: ISPs are businesses, and some ISPs are
    > pretty hard-nosed businesses. If you actually -read- the Terms
    > and Conditions and call the ISP up asking a question, and get
    > a glacial "That's the way it is, and if you don't like it you
    > can start your own ISP" response, then you can be fairly sure
    > that that ISP is *not* interested in hearing what you have to say
    > [other than "Yes, Sir, would it be acceptable if we bring the
    > $10,000 'compensation' by the office this afternoon?"]
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Depending on the wireless router, a simple DHCP check will show who's
    connected and shouldn't be.

    "OJ" <orljustin@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:77d3a68b.0404230500.49b55067@posting.google.com...
    > roberson@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote in message
    news:<c6a7qd$ipd$1@canopus.cc.umanitoba.ca>...
    > > In article <77d3a68b.0404221759.42cdd822@posting.google.com>,
    > > OJ <orljustin@aol.com> wrote:
    > > :Why don't you ask around and see if anyone wants to split the bill?
    > > :Then you could set a WPA password on the network so only you two could
    > > :share it.
    > >
    > > That approach can be quite good, but there's a thorn to watch out for:
    > > many (most) residental ISP contracts have clauses that are dead set
    > > against sharing the service with others, and are especially firm
    > > about not allowing you to "resell" the service. I had a look at some
    > > of the ISP contracts around here a couple of years ago: the wording
    > > on one of the major vendors was such that you couldn't even allow
    > > your direct family to use the ISP connection, even though "It's
    > > good for the whole family" was a major part of their advertisement
    > > campaign.
    > >
    > > If you allow someone (a friend, visitor, relative) to "share" your
    > > connection and the contract says you may not do so, then the usual
    > > consequence is a stiff reminder about the clause (if you are lucky),
    > > or a disconnection of service (with no refund for the rest of the
    > > prepaid term) "for cause" if you are less lucky.
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > How would they even know? And how would that be different from
    > someone who was just glomming onto your connection without your
    > knowledge anyways?
    >
    > oj
    >
    >
    > But if you
    > > "resell" the service, then chances increase that upon discovery
    > > the ISP will send you a bill or lawsuit for "liquidated damages"
    > > equivilent to their deemed "loss of income" under the assumption
    > > that the other parties would have paid at the full going rate if
    > > they hadn't been sharing with you. The argument that the other
    > > parties wouldn't have used the service at all, in such cases
    > > is likely to get you about as far as a collection agency or
    > > court summons, and no-where near a sympathetic ear.
    > >
    > > To put things another way: ISPs are businesses, and some ISPs are
    > > pretty hard-nosed businesses. If you actually -read- the Terms
    > > and Conditions and call the ISP up asking a question, and get
    > > a glacial "That's the way it is, and if you don't like it you
    > > can start your own ISP" response, then you can be fairly sure
    > > that that ISP is *not* interested in hearing what you have to say
    > > [other than "Yes, Sir, would it be acceptable if we bring the
    > > $10,000 'compensation' by the office this afternoon?"]
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Dave Buck wrote:
    > I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?

    (adding to what's been said already)

    OR you and the other tenents could lobby the building owner to provide
    service for the whole building, either wired (less likely) or an access
    point or two for shared wireless. In the long run, it's good for the owner
    (makes rentals more attractive) and the renters get it cheaper than all
    buying it individually. Verizon's flavor of this is call Verizon Avenue.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    It would be best for you to get your own connection both ethically and for
    reliability. Some DSL or broadband connections are not 'always on' and if
    you depend upon your neighbours connection, they may suddenly install a
    program and reboot or crash their server (if they use one) - or they may
    suddenly turn on a security feature.

    You should look into signing up with an ISP that doesnt stop you from
    sharing the connection, then you can split the cost with your neighbours.
    Hopefully before anyone else in your building gets the idea.


    Ray Taylor


    "Dave Buck" <dbmonkey@elvis.com> wrote in message
    news:5293147d.0404220959.68569c21@posting.google.com...
    > I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?
  12. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Dave Buck wrote:

    > I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?

    Yeah, by all means take advantage of it. Next time someone takes one of
    your CDs you paid for, don't think anything of it.

    --
    robert - slackware
  13. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Reputation: The things you do when others are watching.
    Character: The things you do when you are all alone


    "Dave Buck" <dbmonkey@elvis.com> wrote in message
    news:5293147d.0404220959.68569c21@posting.google.com...
    > I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?
  14. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Read what you worte.... HE SAYS you can do it, and does'nt do it himself...
    chances are it's just something he read about and it's not even going on...
    try to connect and see if it's even possible.. chances are good that the guy
    has his enqription ON and no one is sharing or stealing anything... and then
    wait for him to leave the apt and just steal all his equipment, keep what
    you want and sell the rest on Ebay...


    --
    http://www.911MLB.com
    http://www.PICTURES4UONLINE.com
    "Dave Buck" <dbmonkey@elvis.com> wrote in message
    news:5293147d.0404220959.68569c21@posting.google.com...
    > I just moved into a new apartment building. I heard from a neighbor in
    > the building that it's very easy to get free wireless internet access
    > from other residents' wireless connections. However, he doesn't
    > recommend it and he pays for his own internet access.
    >
    > I don't know much about WiFi, but I've Googled this newsgroup a little
    > and I'm looking for recommendations from the experts. Should I take
    > advantage of the situation? Or should I pay $35 a month for DSL?
    >
  15. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    How do you do a DHCP check?

    On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 16:20:33 -0400, "John" <Me@myhome.net> wrote:

    >Depending on the wireless router, a simple DHCP check will show who's
    >connected and shouldn't be.
    >
    >"OJ" <orljustin@aol.com> wrote in message
    >news:77d3a68b.0404230500.49b55067@posting.google.com...
    >> roberson@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote in message
    >news:<c6a7qd$ipd$1@canopus.cc.umanitoba.ca>...
    >> > In article <77d3a68b.0404221759.42cdd822@posting.google.com>,
    >> > OJ <orljustin@aol.com> wrote:
    >> > :Why don't you ask around and see if anyone wants to split the bill?
    >> > :Then you could set a WPA password on the network so only you two could
    >> > :share it.
    >> >
    >> > That approach can be quite good, but there's a thorn to watch out for:
    >> > many (most) residental ISP contracts have clauses that are dead set
    >> > against sharing the service with others, and are especially firm
    >> > about not allowing you to "resell" the service. I had a look at some
    >> > of the ISP contracts around here a couple of years ago: the wording
    >> > on one of the major vendors was such that you couldn't even allow
    >> > your direct family to use the ISP connection, even though "It's
    >> > good for the whole family" was a major part of their advertisement
    >> > campaign.
    >> >
    >> > If you allow someone (a friend, visitor, relative) to "share" your
    >> > connection and the contract says you may not do so, then the usual
    >> > consequence is a stiff reminder about the clause (if you are lucky),
    >> > or a disconnection of service (with no refund for the rest of the
    >> > prepaid term) "for cause" if you are less lucky.
    >>
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> How would they even know? And how would that be different from
    >> someone who was just glomming onto your connection without your
    >> knowledge anyways?
    >>
    >> oj
    >>
    >>
    >> But if you
    >> > "resell" the service, then chances increase that upon discovery
    >> > the ISP will send you a bill or lawsuit for "liquidated damages"
    >> > equivilent to their deemed "loss of income" under the assumption
    >> > that the other parties would have paid at the full going rate if
    >> > they hadn't been sharing with you. The argument that the other
    >> > parties wouldn't have used the service at all, in such cases
    >> > is likely to get you about as far as a collection agency or
    >> > court summons, and no-where near a sympathetic ear.
    >> >
    >> > To put things another way: ISPs are businesses, and some ISPs are
    >> > pretty hard-nosed businesses. If you actually -read- the Terms
    >> > and Conditions and call the ISP up asking a question, and get
    >> > a glacial "That's the way it is, and if you don't like it you
    >> > can start your own ISP" response, then you can be fairly sure
    >> > that that ISP is *not* interested in hearing what you have to say
    >> > [other than "Yes, Sir, would it be acceptable if we bring the
    >> > $10,000 'compensation' by the office this afternoon?"]
    >
  16. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    In your router's config menu, you should be able to see the IP addresses of
    all "attached devices".

    Raul C. Beltizer <raulbeltizer@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:a1k2j0hg4dpqbbrgqiqbq6epdunosjqtmu@4ax.com:

    > How do you do a DHCP check?
Ask a new question

Read More

Internet Access Wireless Internet Wireless Connections Wireless Networking