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Upgrading from Celeron to Pentium

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Anonymous
April 2, 2005 12:03:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I have never upgraded a processor before, but I am thinking of
upgrading to a P4 from a celeron. The most complicated upgrade I've
done is replacing the hard drive (which wasn't all that complicated).
I have a Dell 2400 Celeron @ 2.2ghz. I have been told that I can
upgrade to a P4 as long as it is compatible w/ an Intel 845 400mhz or
533mhz fsb. I use adobe graphics programs, but the only game I play on
a regular basis is The Sims 2. (I have recently upgraded my HD to a
160gb Seagate, 1 gig of RAM, and have a 256mb GeForce FX5200 PCI on the
way)

My questions are:

Will I notice a major improvement from a 2.2ghz celeron vs. a 2.2 ghz
P4 (however, I'll most likely purchase a 2.4-2.6)?

How complicated of an install is this? Does it involve simply removing
the old processor and installing in the upgrade in its place, or is it
move involved? Would the heat sink need to be replaced as well?

Does anyone have any suggestions as to what CPU would be best in the
$100-$200 price range, or any potential problems to look out for? Any
help would be appreciated, thanks in advance (sorry for the rather long
winded post).

Joe
April 2, 2005 5:17:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

as far as 2d graphics speed you probably won't see a big speed difference
pages may load a bit faster but in games it will probably smooth them out
and load faster.

"Planetoad" <planetoad@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112413798.998219.210640@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>I have never upgraded a processor before, but I am thinking of
> upgrading to a P4 from a celeron. The most complicated upgrade I've
> done is replacing the hard drive (which wasn't all that complicated).
> I have a Dell 2400 Celeron @ 2.2ghz. I have been told that I can
> upgrade to a P4 as long as it is compatible w/ an Intel 845 400mhz or
> 533mhz fsb. I use adobe graphics programs, but the only game I play on
> a regular basis is The Sims 2. (I have recently upgraded my HD to a
> 160gb Seagate, 1 gig of RAM, and have a 256mb GeForce FX5200 PCI on the
> way)
>
> My questions are:
>
> Will I notice a major improvement from a 2.2ghz celeron vs. a 2.2 ghz
> P4 (however, I'll most likely purchase a 2.4-2.6)?
>
> How complicated of an install is this? Does it involve simply removing
> the old processor and installing in the upgrade in its place, or is it
> move involved? Would the heat sink need to be replaced as well?
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions as to what CPU would be best in the
> $100-$200 price range, or any potential problems to look out for? Any
> help would be appreciated, thanks in advance (sorry for the rather long
> winded post).
>
> Joe
>
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 9:57:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

It's pretty easy to replace a processor on a 2400. Remove the heat sink, then
remove the old processor, then reverse the process. Make sure you have at least
DDR memory rated at PC2700 or faster. PC2100 is too slow for a processor that
demands a 533MHz FSB. The original heat sink should suffice.

I'm not sure how much of an improvement in performance you will see with a 2.2,
2.4, 2.53 or 2.6GHz Pentium 4... Ben Myers
\
On 1 Apr 2005 20:03:28 -0800, "Planetoad" <planetoad@hotmail.com> wrote:

>I have never upgraded a processor before, but I am thinking of
>upgrading to a P4 from a celeron. The most complicated upgrade I've
>done is replacing the hard drive (which wasn't all that complicated).
>I have a Dell 2400 Celeron @ 2.2ghz. I have been told that I can
>upgrade to a P4 as long as it is compatible w/ an Intel 845 400mhz or
>533mhz fsb. I use adobe graphics programs, but the only game I play on
>a regular basis is The Sims 2. (I have recently upgraded my HD to a
>160gb Seagate, 1 gig of RAM, and have a 256mb GeForce FX5200 PCI on the
>way)
>
>My questions are:
>
>Will I notice a major improvement from a 2.2ghz celeron vs. a 2.2 ghz
>P4 (however, I'll most likely purchase a 2.4-2.6)?
>
>How complicated of an install is this? Does it involve simply removing
>the old processor and installing in the upgrade in its place, or is it
>move involved? Would the heat sink need to be replaced as well?
>
>Does anyone have any suggestions as to what CPU would be best in the
>$100-$200 price range, or any potential problems to look out for? Any
>help would be appreciated, thanks in advance (sorry for the rather long
>winded post).
>
>Joe
>
Related resources
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 3:39:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

The P4 performs appreciably better. Just make sure you realize that not
all P4s will work in this system - you must use one with a 512K cache
(the Prescotts, with the 1M cache won't work; neither will the 800 MHz
bus units -you must use a 400 or 533 MHz bus P4).

You can find any number of very good power supplies for $50-75. I would
not put a $100-200 PS into a budget system like a 2400 - it's overkill,
and if price things now, you will find that you can buy a complete 3000
system (the 2400s replacement) for about $350 - and a 4700 system for
$50 more than that.




Planetoad wrote:
> I have never upgraded a processor before, but I am thinking of
> upgrading to a P4 from a celeron. The most complicated upgrade I've
> done is replacing the hard drive (which wasn't all that complicated).
> I have a Dell 2400 Celeron @ 2.2ghz. I have been told that I can
> upgrade to a P4 as long as it is compatible w/ an Intel 845 400mhz or
> 533mhz fsb. I use adobe graphics programs, but the only game I play on
> a regular basis is The Sims 2. (I have recently upgraded my HD to a
> 160gb Seagate, 1 gig of RAM, and have a 256mb GeForce FX5200 PCI on the
> way)
>
> My questions are:
>
> Will I notice a major improvement from a 2.2ghz celeron vs. a 2.2 ghz
> P4 (however, I'll most likely purchase a 2.4-2.6)?
>
> How complicated of an install is this? Does it involve simply removing
> the old processor and installing in the upgrade in its place, or is it
> move involved? Would the heat sink need to be replaced as well?
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions as to what CPU would be best in the
> $100-$200 price range, or any potential problems to look out for? Any
> help would be appreciated, thanks in advance (sorry for the rather long
> winded post).
>
> Joe
>
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 5:22:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Planetoad" <planetoad@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112413798.998219.210640@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> I have never upgraded a processor before, but I am thinking of
> upgrading to a P4 from a celeron. The most complicated upgrade I've
> done is replacing the hard drive (which wasn't all that complicated).
> I have a Dell 2400 Celeron @ 2.2ghz. I have been told that I can
> upgrade to a P4 as long as it is compatible w/ an Intel 845 400mhz or
> 533mhz fsb. I use adobe graphics programs, but the only game I play on
> a regular basis is The Sims 2. (I have recently upgraded my HD to a
> 160gb Seagate, 1 gig of RAM, and have a 256mb GeForce FX5200 PCI on the
> way)
>
> My questions are:
>
> Will I notice a major improvement from a 2.2ghz celeron vs. a 2.2 ghz
> P4 (however, I'll most likely purchase a 2.4-2.6)?
>
> How complicated of an install is this? Does it involve simply removing
> the old processor and installing in the upgrade in its place, or is it
> move involved? Would the heat sink need to be replaced as well?
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions as to what CPU would be best in the
> $100-$200 price range, or any potential problems to look out for? Any
> help would be appreciated, thanks in advance (sorry for the rather long
> winded post).
>
> Joe

I wouldn't waste $100-200 upgrading a 2400 system. Unless that processor is
causing you specific problems with something you're trying to run I think
you'll be disappointed after spending all that money. I'd put the money
aside for the 2400 replacement. A few bucks more will get you a new system
with updated bus, slots, etc. (without a monitor).

If you do decide to go through with it you'll want to check the version of
the BIOS you have. You might have to flash to the latest level to get
support for your new procssor, but maybe not. Don't flash if you don't have
to but it is something to check out.

Also, order your stuff here, www.newegg.com and don't forget this
http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?descripti...
and maybe some of this
http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?descripti...

If you do upgrade then I'd go with the highest BIOS supported processor.
Might as well get as much as you can from the system for as long as you can
get it. Also the RETAIL package and it'll have a P4 heat sink but more
importantly a 3 year warranty on the processor. It's usually only a few
bucks more than the OEM version (1yr, no heat sink)

Good luck!
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 10:40:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Thanks to everyone for all the info. I'm a total novice, but I know
that it does seem like overkill with all the upgrades on a 2400, but
I've upgraded pretty much everything else on this system, so I'm going
to keep it as long as possible (so as to not feel like a complete moron
for putting so much money into it). I'm trying to learn whatever I can
about this stuff, so I can build my own computer later on (and not buy
a computer because it's cheap, such as the 2400); this should help me
get a little more experience working with the innards of the computer.
Like I said, I'm not a huge gamer, so it doesn't have to be the best,
most powerful computer, but I'd like it to last me a few more years.
However, due to car repairs, I'll have to hold off upgrading the
processor for awhile, but I'll eventually do it. I think I'll go with
the 2.24ghz retail box (through newegg of course, haven't gone wrong
with them yet). Again, thanks for all the help.

Joe
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 4:52:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> Thanks to everyone for all the info. I'm a total novice, but I know
> that it does seem like overkill with all the upgrades on a 2400, but
> I've upgraded pretty much everything else on this system, so I'm going
> to keep it as long as possible (so as to not feel like a complete moron
> for putting so much money into it). I'm trying to learn whatever I can
> about this stuff, so I can build my own computer later on (and not buy
> a computer because it's cheap, such as the 2400); this should help me
> get a little more experience working with the innards of the computer.
> Like I said, I'm not a huge gamer, so it doesn't have to be the best,
> most powerful computer, but I'd like it to last me a few more years.
> However, due to car repairs, I'll have to hold off upgrading the
> processor for awhile, but I'll eventually do it. I think I'll go with
> the 2.24ghz retail box (through newegg of course, haven't gone wrong
> with them yet). Again, thanks for all the help.
>
I went through this upgrade process on my 2400 about 8 months ago. I
replaced a 2.4Ghz Celeron (400MHz FSB) with a 2.8Ghz Pentium 4 (533MHz
FSB). I noticed about a 30% increase in performance, which is about
twice as much as the increase in frequency alone would suggest. Going
from a 400MHz FSB to 533MHz also increaes the memory speed, from
266MHz to 333MHz. The memory supplied in your machine should already
support that speed, but check to be sure. You may find, when you take
the heat sink out, that the existing CPU comes with it.

There's not a lot of point buying a retail box, as Dell don't use the
standard heat sink and fan combination - they have their own "heat
pipe" type arrangement, with the fan on the side of the case, and just
a huge heat sink on the CPU. The motherboard supports Pentium 4 CPUs
of up to 3.06Ghz at 533MHz FSB - but, as others have said, make sure
that it's got 512KB cache. I tried a 1MB cache CPU model, as the
seller thought it would work, but it didn't, so I had to return it. I
managed to pick up my 2.8GHz P4 second-hand for £50 (about $90).
You'll find it harder to get the 533MHZ FSB models new, as time goes
on, as Intel don't make them any more. Incidentally, the 3.06GHz P4
is the only model with 533MHz FSB that supports HyperThreading.

Simon Kempster
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 10:07:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Simon Kempster" <simon.kempster@talk21.com> wrote in message
news:D abc429b.0504042352.fc52d41@posting.google.com...
>> Thanks to everyone for all the info. I'm a total novice, but I know
>> that it does seem like overkill with all the upgrades on a 2400, but
>> I've upgraded pretty much everything else on this system, so I'm going
>> to keep it as long as possible (so as to not feel like a complete moron
>> for putting so much money into it). I'm trying to learn whatever I can
>> about this stuff, so I can build my own computer later on (and not buy
>> a computer because it's cheap, such as the 2400); this should help me
>> get a little more experience working with the innards of the computer.
>> Like I said, I'm not a huge gamer, so it doesn't have to be the best,
>> most powerful computer, but I'd like it to last me a few more years.
>> However, due to car repairs, I'll have to hold off upgrading the
>> processor for awhile, but I'll eventually do it. I think I'll go with
>> the 2.24ghz retail box (through newegg of course, haven't gone wrong
>> with them yet). Again, thanks for all the help.
>>
> I went through this upgrade process on my 2400 about 8 months ago. I
> replaced a 2.4Ghz Celeron (400MHz FSB) with a 2.8Ghz Pentium 4 (533MHz
> FSB). I noticed about a 30% increase in performance, which is about
> twice as much as the increase in frequency alone would suggest. Going
> from a 400MHz FSB to 533MHz also increaes the memory speed, from
> 266MHz to 333MHz. The memory supplied in your machine should already
> support that speed, but check to be sure. You may find, when you take
> the heat sink out, that the existing CPU comes with it.
>
> There's not a lot of point buying a retail box, as Dell don't use the
> standard heat sink and fan combination - they have their own "heat
> pipe" type arrangement, with the fan on the side of the case, and just
> a huge heat sink on the CPU. The motherboard supports Pentium 4 CPUs
> of up to 3.06Ghz at 533MHz FSB - but, as others have said, make sure
> that it's got 512KB cache. I tried a 1MB cache CPU model, as the
> seller thought it would work, but it didn't, so I had to return it. I
> managed to pick up my 2.8GHz P4 second-hand for £50 (about $90).
> You'll find it harder to get the 533MHZ FSB models new, as time goes
> on, as Intel don't make them any more. Incidentally, the 3.06GHz P4
> is the only model with 533MHz FSB that supports HyperThreading.
>
> Simon Kempster


And I might add that the 3.06GHz/533mhz HT chip was selling for a
ridiculously high premium the last time I checked.


Stew
!