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Anonymous
April 9, 2005 10:31:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?

More about : dell engineers

Anonymous
April 9, 2005 10:31:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers

On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 18:31:08 +1000, "Paul Barham" <barhampa@optusnet.com.au>
wrote:

>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
>
>
April 9, 2005 10:31:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

w its a new one on me
<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>
> On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 18:31:08 +1000, "Paul Barham"
> <barhampa@optusnet.com.au>
> wrote:
>
>>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
>>
>>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
April 9, 2005 10:31:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Ben Myers wrote:
>
> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers

Sounds like the politically correct term for a "gym teacher"
(Physical Education Engineer)!

Notan
Anonymous
April 9, 2005 10:31:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>
> On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 18:31:08 +1000, "Paul Barham"
> <barhampa@optusnet.com.au>
> wrote:
>
>>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
>>
>>

I would guess that he means Power Edge Engineers ... thats the only relative
thing I can think of that PE could pertain to.
Anonymous
April 9, 2005 10:31:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>(Ben Myers)> wrote:

>>"Paul Barham" wrote:
>
>>>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
>
>> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers

>w its a new one on me

From http://www.nspe.org/aboutnspe/ab1-what.asp, the National
Society of Professional Engineers.

"What is a Professional Engineer?
Like doctors who have passed the medical boards or lawyers who
have passed the bar exam, professional engineers (PEs) have
fulfilled the education and experience requirements and passed
the rigorous exams that, under state licensure laws, permit them
to offer engineering services directly to the public. PEs take
legal responsibility for their engineering designs and are bound
by a code of ethics to protect the public health and safety.
Engineering licensure laws vary from state to state, but, in
general, to become a PE an individual must be a graduate of an
engineering program accredited by the Accreditation Board for
Engineering and Technology, pass the Fundamentals of Engineering
exam, gain four years of experience working under a PE, and pass
the Principles and Practice of Engineering exam.

A state engineering licensure board regulates the licensed
practice of engineering within a state.

The National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), in
conjunction with its state societies and chapters, represents the
interests of PEs nationwide."

While the biggest concentration of PEs is in the civil
engineering fields associated with but not limited to the
construction arena, mechanical/structural/electrical/etc., it
encompasses the full range of engineering disciplines. Note that
"...permit them to offer engineering services directly to the
public," in the NSPE definition.

While the company my old boss started specialized in, at least
for the years I worked for him, doing Reliability and
Maintainability engineering and analysis work on Navy sonar
systems under DoN contracts; because he didn't ever sit for his
PE, nor ever hire a PE, we could never branch out into offering
R/M engineering/analysis services to the public. We were limited
to working under government or corporation contracts.
--
OJ III
[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
April 9, 2005 10:31:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Sat, 09 Apr 2005 10:26:39 -0600, Notan <notan@ddress.com> wrote:

>Ben Myers wrote:
>>
>> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>
>Sounds like the politically correct term for a "gym teacher"
>(Physical Education Engineer)!
>
>Notan

Buzz, wrong answer but thank you for playing. See the previous
response to this question.
Anonymous
April 9, 2005 11:14:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Wow! If that's what a Dell PE needs to do to be called a PE, that's a bunch.
Neither software nor hardware engineering are disciplines for which many (if
any?) states have rigorous licensing exams and issue some sort of certificates.

The IEEE has its cerifications which apply to hardware engineers. I don't know
of any unbiased (e.g. not Microsoft and not Novell) exams and certifications
that cover areas of software engineering, now an incredibly broad discipline.
This may be one of the factors that explains the sheer shabbiness of modern
software, lacking in reliability and security.

May the OP could edify us as to what HE means by Dell PE engineers. This would
reduce further guesswork and attempts at mindreading... Ben Myers

On Sat, 09 Apr 2005 13:14:42 -0400, Ogden Johnson III <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:

>"Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>
>>(Ben Myers)> wrote:
>
>>>"Paul Barham" wrote:
>>
>>>>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
>>
>>> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>
>>w its a new one on me
>
>From http://www.nspe.org/aboutnspe/ab1-what.asp, the National
>Society of Professional Engineers.
>
>"What is a Professional Engineer?
>Like doctors who have passed the medical boards or lawyers who
>have passed the bar exam, professional engineers (PEs) have
>fulfilled the education and experience requirements and passed
>the rigorous exams that, under state licensure laws, permit them
>to offer engineering services directly to the public. PEs take
>legal responsibility for their engineering designs and are bound
>by a code of ethics to protect the public health and safety.
>Engineering licensure laws vary from state to state, but, in
>general, to become a PE an individual must be a graduate of an
>engineering program accredited by the Accreditation Board for
>Engineering and Technology, pass the Fundamentals of Engineering
>exam, gain four years of experience working under a PE, and pass
>the Principles and Practice of Engineering exam.
>
>A state engineering licensure board regulates the licensed
>practice of engineering within a state.
>
>The National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), in
>conjunction with its state societies and chapters, represents the
>interests of PEs nationwide."
>
>While the biggest concentration of PEs is in the civil
>engineering fields associated with but not limited to the
>construction arena, mechanical/structural/electrical/etc., it
>encompasses the full range of engineering disciplines. Note that
>"...permit them to offer engineering services directly to the
>public," in the NSPE definition.
>
>While the company my old boss started specialized in, at least
>for the years I worked for him, doing Reliability and
>Maintainability engineering and analysis work on Navy sonar
>systems under DoN contracts; because he didn't ever sit for his
>PE, nor ever hire a PE, we could never branch out into offering
>R/M engineering/analysis services to the public. We were limited
>to working under government or corporation contracts.
>--
>OJ III
>[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
>Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
Anonymous
April 9, 2005 11:30:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Ben Myers wrote:
> Wow! If that's what a Dell PE needs to do to be called a PE, that's a bunch.
> Neither software nor hardware engineering are disciplines for which many (if
> any?) states have rigorous licensing exams and issue some sort of certificates.
>
> The IEEE has its cerifications which apply to hardware engineers. I don't know
> of any unbiased (e.g. not Microsoft and not Novell) exams and certifications
> that cover areas of software engineering, now an incredibly broad discipline.
> This may be one of the factors that explains the sheer shabbiness of modern
> software, lacking in reliability and security.
>
> May the OP could edify us as to what HE means by Dell PE engineers. This would
> reduce further guesswork and attempts at mindreading... Ben Myers
>
> On Sat, 09 Apr 2005 13:14:42 -0400, Ogden Johnson III <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
I agree, the majority of people who take the exam referred to in the
grandparent post are civil engineers (not electrical or computer,
although we can take it) since it's required if they want to legally be
able to sign off on construction projects. I doubt that's what the
original poster was referring to (not to mention he called them "PE
engineers" which would be redundant).

On a side note, I don't know about other states, but in California you
may take the first part of the PE exam (called the EIT -- Engineer In
Training) after 4 years of training in an engineering discipline at a
higher education institution (exceptions are made for work extensive
experience instead of college). After you pass that, you must spend
another 4 years in the field before you take a second exam, which you
must pass in order to be considered a PE (and may append it after your
name). I can't think of a major reason why a computer or software
engineer would need to take the test (although certain depths in EE may
require it).
April 10, 2005 12:45:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Ahh some American thing, no wonder we'd never heard of it :) 
"Ogden Johnson III" <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:tr2g51pcjmovg0e2v8p9aclon2ikepsdc6@4ax.com...
> "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>
>>(Ben Myers)> wrote:
>
>>>"Paul Barham" wrote:
>>
>>>>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
>>
>>> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>
>>w its a new one on me
>
> From http://www.nspe.org/aboutnspe/ab1-what.asp, the National
> Society of Professional Engineers.
>
> "What is a Professional Engineer?
> Like doctors who have passed the medical boards or lawyers who
> have passed the bar exam, professional engineers (PEs) have
> fulfilled the education and experience requirements and passed
> the rigorous exams that, under state licensure laws, permit them
> to offer engineering services directly to the public. PEs take
> legal responsibility for their engineering designs and are bound
> by a code of ethics to protect the public health and safety.
> Engineering licensure laws vary from state to state, but, in
> general, to become a PE an individual must be a graduate of an
> engineering program accredited by the Accreditation Board for
> Engineering and Technology, pass the Fundamentals of Engineering
> exam, gain four years of experience working under a PE, and pass
> the Principles and Practice of Engineering exam.
>
> A state engineering licensure board regulates the licensed
> practice of engineering within a state.
>
> The National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), in
> conjunction with its state societies and chapters, represents the
> interests of PEs nationwide."
>
> While the biggest concentration of PEs is in the civil
> engineering fields associated with but not limited to the
> construction arena, mechanical/structural/electrical/etc., it
> encompasses the full range of engineering disciplines. Note that
> "...permit them to offer engineering services directly to the
> public," in the NSPE definition.
>
> While the company my old boss started specialized in, at least
> for the years I worked for him, doing Reliability and
> Maintainability engineering and analysis work on Navy sonar
> systems under DoN contracts; because he didn't ever sit for his
> PE, nor ever hire a PE, we could never branch out into offering
> R/M engineering/analysis services to the public. We were limited
> to working under government or corporation contracts.
> --
> OJ III
> [Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
> Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
April 10, 2005 12:46:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Ahh but then is he after Retired PE engineers or Engineers that are no
longer working for Dell?????
"NuTCrAcKeR" <nutcracker@internationalhacker.org> wrote in message
news:MqidnZ0L-JhzucXfRVn-sw@speakeasy.net...
>
> <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
> news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
>> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>>
>> On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 18:31:08 +1000, "Paul Barham"
>> <barhampa@optusnet.com.au>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
>>>
>>>
>
> I would guess that he means Power Edge Engineers ... thats the only
> relative thing I can think of that PE could pertain to.
>
April 10, 2005 12:46:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

P.E.= Partially Educated...


..



"Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:D 39ben$ecd$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
> Ahh but then is he after Retired PE engineers or Engineers that are no
> longer working for Dell?????
> "NuTCrAcKeR" <nutcracker@internationalhacker.org> wrote in message
> news:MqidnZ0L-JhzucXfRVn-sw@speakeasy.net...
>>
>> <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
>> news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
>>> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>>>
>>> On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 18:31:08 +1000, "Paul Barham"
>>> <barhampa@optusnet.com.au>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
>>>>
>>>>
>>
>> I would guess that he means Power Edge Engineers ... thats the only
>> relative thing I can think of that PE could pertain to.
>>
>
>
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 3:01:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> >Ben Myers wrote:
> >> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
> >
> Notan wrote:
> >Sounds like the politically correct term for a "gym teacher"
> >(Physical Education Engineer)!
> >
> >Notan
>

"Bill" wrote:
> Buzz, wrong answer but thank you for playing. See the
> previous response to this question.

I like Notan's answer better. Thanks for the laugh, Notan!
April 10, 2005 3:42:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 20:45:11 +0100, "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com>
wrote:

>Ahh some American thing, no wonder we'd never heard of it :) 


Canada, Australia and the UK have similar programs.
April 10, 2005 3:45:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Sat, 09 Apr 2005 19:14:06 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
(Ben Myers) wrote:

>Wow! If that's what a Dell PE needs to do to be called a PE, that's a bunch.
>Neither software nor hardware engineering are disciplines for which many (if
>any?) states have rigorous licensing exams and issue some sort of certificates.
>
>The IEEE has its cerifications which apply to hardware engineers. I don't know
>of any unbiased (e.g. not Microsoft and not Novell) exams and certifications
>that cover areas of software engineering, now an incredibly broad discipline.
>This may be one of the factors that explains the sheer shabbiness of modern
>software, lacking in reliability and security.
>
>
Texas Professional Engineers Board has recently added the disciplie of
software engineer. Hardware engineers, in Texas, would most likely
fall under Electrical Engineer.

In Texas, at least, if you wish to offer your services as an
"engineer," with some certain exceptions, you have to be registered
with the Texas Professional Engineers Board.
April 10, 2005 11:01:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Well as a Dell engineer in the UK I've never heard of this program
"Bill" <bnospamgross@nospam.airmail.net> wrote in message
news:o qli51djcr0iheeldoue608s3n3ginptbv@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 20:45:11 +0100, "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Ahh some American thing, no wonder we'd never heard of it :) 
>
>
> Canada, Australia and the UK have similar programs.
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 11:01:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I believe the U.K. equivalent to the U.S.'s "Professional Engineer" is a
"Registered Engineer", or perhaps a "Chartered Engineer".

While any U.S.-based engineer can choose to go through the (rather
involved) process to become a Professional Engineer, it is _generally_
only required for those involved in work involving public safety.
(Although it is advantageous for those involved in some aspects of
consulting engineering, especially as an expert witness in legal
affairs. Personally, I haven't bothered. Nothing much in it for me.)

I suspect a similiar situation applies to UK-based engineers.

Bob Pownall


Fixer wrote:
> Well as a Dell engineer in the UK I've never heard of this program
> "Bill" <bnospamgross@nospam.airmail.net> wrote in message
> news:o qli51djcr0iheeldoue608s3n3ginptbv@4ax.com...
>
>>On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 20:45:11 +0100, "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com>
>>wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Ahh some American thing, no wonder we'd never heard of it :) 
>>
>>
>>Canada, Australia and the UK have similar programs.
>
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 11:01:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>Well as a Dell engineer in the UK I've never heard of this program

Your equivalent in the UK would seem to be Engineering Council
UK, which http://www.engc.org.uk/who_we_are/index.asp describes
itself, in part, thusly:

"Under its Royal Charter, the ECUK regulates the engineering
profession in the UK and formally represents the interests of UK
engineers abroad. It is a Designated Authority under the current
General Systems Directives."

and seems to administer the UK-SPEC program
http://www.uk-spec.org.uk/, which as described on that intro
page:

"The UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence
UK-SPEC is the standard for recognition of professional engineers
and engineering technicians in the UK. The standard is published
by ECUK on behalf of the engineering profession.

What are Chartered Engineers, Incorporated Engineers &
Engineering Technicians?

Implementation

More information for employers....more

The standard as applied to professional engineers ...(260k pdf)

The standard as applied to professional engineering technicians
.... (260k pdf)

Professional bodies who wish to be able to register people...
more

Professional bodies who wish to be able to accredit education or
a training programme...more

Getting an education or training programme accredited... more "

seems to have much of the same purpose as Professional Engineer
testing/accreditation/licensing does in the US.
--
OJ III
[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
April 11, 2005 3:41:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Are these not Mechanical Engineers rather than PC engineers?
"Ogden Johnson III" <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:p 47j511ie9o7a49ulcnotu2glbe74gn6fe@4ax.com...
> "Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>
>>Well as a Dell engineer in the UK I've never heard of this program
>
> Your equivalent in the UK would seem to be Engineering Council
> UK, which http://www.engc.org.uk/who_we_are/index.asp describes
> itself, in part, thusly:
>
> "Under its Royal Charter, the ECUK regulates the engineering
> profession in the UK and formally represents the interests of UK
> engineers abroad. It is a Designated Authority under the current
> General Systems Directives."
>
> and seems to administer the UK-SPEC program
> http://www.uk-spec.org.uk/, which as described on that intro
> page:
>
> "The UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence
> UK-SPEC is the standard for recognition of professional engineers
> and engineering technicians in the UK. The standard is published
> by ECUK on behalf of the engineering profession.
>
> What are Chartered Engineers, Incorporated Engineers &
> Engineering Technicians?
>
> Implementation
>
> More information for employers....more
>
> The standard as applied to professional engineers ...(260k pdf)
>
> The standard as applied to professional engineering technicians
> ... (260k pdf)
>
> Professional bodies who wish to be able to register people...
> more
>
> Professional bodies who wish to be able to accredit education or
> a training programme...more
>
> Getting an education or training programme accredited... more "
>
> seems to have much of the same purpose as Professional Engineer
> testing/accreditation/licensing does in the US.
> --
> OJ III
> [Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
> Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 3:41:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Fixer" <steve.h1@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>Are these not Mechanical Engineers rather than PC engineers?

As part of pooking around that page, I found it extends to
electronics. In fact, one of the pages that led me to the ECUK
page, was the website of your Brit version of our IEEE.

As others have noted, the PE is more important to the
Civil/Mechanical/Structural/Industrial Engineering side of the
house. However, had you dug into that web site I originally
provided, you would have found how to obtain study materials/info
on the PE for Electrical and Computing.
--
OJ III
[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 11:13:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
> What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>
In industry, PE would stand for Principle Engineer. A PE is one step up
the technical ladder above Senior Engineer; experience, contributions/value
to the organization, teaching/mentoring younger engineers etc. are all
considered when recommended for that position. In my company it is an
appointed position requiring six letters of recommendtion at that leval or
above, a number of approval layers and then final approval of the Chief
Engineer. I was appointed a PE in my company and at my location, out of
approx 2000 engineers, there were only three Principle Engineers. Total
number of engineers in my organization is about 5000 and I was the first one
appointed in 3 years.
I mention this so that one can appreciate the title of PE and what it takes
to get it.
MLD







> On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 18:31:08 +1000, "Paul Barham"
<barhampa@optusnet.com.au>
> wrote:
>
> >Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 2:05:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

NuTCrAcKeR wrote:
> <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
> news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
>
>>What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>>
>>On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 18:31:08 +1000, "Paul Barham"
>><barhampa@optusnet.com.au>
>>wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
>
> I would guess that he means Power Edge Engineers ... thats the only relative
> thing I can think of that PE could pertain to.

Personal Entropy?

Proctological Exam?

Partners in Extremis?

Paving Exam?
April 12, 2005 9:04:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

MLD wrote:
> <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
> news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
>
>>What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>>
>
> In industry, PE would stand for Principle Engineer. A PE is one step up
> the technical ladder above Senior Engineer.

PE also stands for Professional Engineer. PE is a license issued by
states to graduates of accredited engineering schools after an exam
covering engineering theory and practice in one of the engineering
disciplines. PE licensure is typically required before an engineer
(civil, electrical, structural, mechanical, or any other) can offer his
or her services to the general public. For example, if I was developing
some land and needed to have roads designed, I would be required to hire
a PE to design the roads.
April 13, 2005 4:32:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Bill" <bnospamgross@nospam.airmail.net> wrote in message
news:htli5196itjirihft4jleovd5gj16l0fjk@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 09 Apr 2005 19:14:06 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
> (Ben Myers) wrote:
>
> >Wow! If that's what a Dell PE needs to do to be called a PE, that's a
bunch.
> >Neither software nor hardware engineering are disciplines for which many
(if
> >any?) states have rigorous licensing exams and issue some sort of
certificates.
> >
> >The IEEE has its cerifications which apply to hardware engineers. I
don't know
> >of any unbiased (e.g. not Microsoft and not Novell) exams and
certifications
> >that cover areas of software engineering, now an incredibly broad
discipline.
> >This may be one of the factors that explains the sheer shabbiness of
modern
> >software, lacking in reliability and security.
> >
> >
> Texas Professional Engineers Board has recently added the disciplie of
> software engineer. Hardware engineers, in Texas, would most likely
> fall under Electrical Engineer.
>
> In Texas, at least, if you wish to offer your services as an
> "engineer," with some certain exceptions, you have to be registered
> with the Texas Professional Engineers Board.

In over 25 years, the only PE's that I've seen are engineers who are
involved
in some sort of construction (yes, electrical engineers too). I worked in
providing
contract engineering services for many industries and have never met a PE
involved
in the computer field, never met a PE involved in the consumer electronics
field, never
met a PE involved in the defense field (a little scary?), never met a PE in
the medical
equipment field (also a bit scary...), never met a PE in the automotive
field...you get
the idea. Also, many states have reciprocal licensure agreements. I
haven't seen the
test in a long time, but when I looked at it, taking it would be totally
useless for work
in the fields I mentioned above.

George
April 13, 2005 4:37:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Sparky Spartacus" <Sparky@spartacus.galaxy.org> wrote in message
news:n1G6e.1125$5J4.867@fe09.lga...
> NuTCrAcKeR wrote:
> > <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
> > news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
> >
> >>What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
> >>
> >>On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 18:31:08 +1000, "Paul Barham"
> >><barhampa@optusnet.com.au>
> >>wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
> >
> > I would guess that he means Power Edge Engineers ... thats the only
relative
> > thing I can think of that PE could pertain to.
>
> Personal Entropy?
>
> Proctological Exam?
>
> Partners in Extremis?
>
> Paving Exam?
>

In high tech, especially for a commodity product company, it is probably
most appropriately
translated as "Physically Exhausted".
April 13, 2005 4:39:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"MLD" <MLD@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:T%z6e.8747$nH4.8350@trndny05...
>
> <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
> news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
> > What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
> >
> In industry, PE would stand for Principle Engineer. A PE is one step up
> the technical ladder above Senior Engineer; experience,
contributions/value
> to the organization, teaching/mentoring younger engineers etc. are all
> considered when recommended for that position. In my company it is an
> appointed position requiring six letters of recommendtion at that leval or
> above, a number of approval layers and then final approval of the Chief
> Engineer. I was appointed a PE in my company and at my location, out of
> approx 2000 engineers, there were only three Principle Engineers. Total
> number of engineers in my organization is about 5000 and I was the first
one
> appointed in 3 years.
> I mention this so that one can appreciate the title of PE and what it
takes
> to get it.
> MLD
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 18:31:08 +1000, "Paul Barham"
> <barhampa@optusnet.com.au>
> > wrote:
> >
> > >Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
> > >
> > >
> >
>
>

Your answer did jog my mind a bit on what it could (logically) be at a
company
like Dell. Perhaps, either "Product Engineer" or "Project Engineer".
April 13, 2005 4:41:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Stubby" <mjhuffma@pro-ns.net> wrote in message
news:o cT6e.1339$5I5.55877@newshog.newsread.com...
> MLD wrote:
> > <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
> > news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
> >
> >>What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
> >>
> >
> > In industry, PE would stand for Principle Engineer. A PE is one step
up
> > the technical ladder above Senior Engineer.
>
> PE also stands for Professional Engineer. PE is a license issued by
> states to graduates of accredited engineering schools after an exam
> covering engineering theory and practice in one of the engineering
> disciplines. PE licensure is typically required before an engineer
> (civil, electrical, structural, mechanical, or any other) can offer his
> or her services to the general public. For example, if I was developing
> some land and needed to have roads designed, I would be required to hire
> a PE to design the roads.

Ironically, you wouldn't have a CLUE that a PE was hired by looking at the
roads here...both design and longevity/condition.
Anonymous
April 14, 2005 6:30:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

George wrote:
> "Sparky Spartacus" <Sparky@spartacus.galaxy.org> wrote in message
> news:n1G6e.1125$5J4.867@fe09.lga...
>
>>NuTCrAcKeR wrote:
>>
>>><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
>>>news:4257cfdc.1233411@nntp.charter.net...
>>>
>>>
>>>>What's a PE emgineer? ... Ben Myers
>>>>
>>>>On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 18:31:08 +1000, "Paul Barham"
>>>><barhampa@optusnet.com.au>
>>>>wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Are there any ex-Dell PE engineers out there ?
>>>
>>>I would guess that he means Power Edge Engineers ... thats the only
>
> relative
>
>>>thing I can think of that PE could pertain to.
>>
>>Personal Entropy?
>>
>>Proctological Exam?
>>
>>Partners in Extremis?
>>
>>Paving Exam?
>>
>
>
> In high tech, especially for a commodity product company, it is probably
> most appropriately translated as "Physically Exhausted".

You get the cigar!
!