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Linux vs Windows for a CS Game Server

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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September 7, 2003 3:17:15 PM

Im thinking of setting up an online CS game server that my clan can use to play clan matches on. The system is going to be:

Celeron 400Mhz
MSI 440LX Mobo
256MB PC133 (2-2-5-2)
ATI Rage Pro AGP
40GB Segate 5400RPM HDD

I know this system isnt the best, but I think it will be enough to host an 8 person CS server with decent performance.

Now my main questio is, Which OS should I use for this job. The server will most likely be on all the time. Ive heard that Linux is the best for this type of computer, however will the performance be as good as a Windows 2000 Server?

Also, Im planning on using a program called Remote administrator to set this comp up (it allows you to control one computer from another over a network, thus making a monitor, keyboard and mouse unnecesary for the system) but I think it only works for windows, is there a Linux equivalent available?

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September 7, 2003 4:15:06 PM

Id put linux, and never load XFree86. U'll run the server from the "prompt" or console, and just SSH to your server to configure it and maintain it. no need for remote program.
September 7, 2003 9:52:39 PM

What Ganache said.

Maybe load X just to set everything up as it's a bit easier, then reboot to a command line. You can have ssh set up so you can log in to your linux box via a command line and then submit commands there. Much simpler than win2k + addon programs etc.

Some day I'll be rich and famous for inventing a device that allows you to stab people in the face over the internet.
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September 8, 2003 12:25:09 AM

Just a note to add, SSH for windows is available in an app called PuTTY. IIRC, there is a link from www.openssh.org

<i>Knock Knock, Neo</i>
September 9, 2003 2:27:41 AM

True. I've used it too. Cool prog.

Some day I'll be rich and famous for inventing a device that allows you to stab people in the face over the internet.
September 13, 2003 5:19:17 PM

It's very easy. Some distros give you the option in the install of automatically loading the gui or not. The simplest way if you haven't done the install already is to set it to not automatically load the gui, then for your setup stuff just type startx and it'll load. You can do all your configuring with a gui to make it easier/faster. Next time you reboot just start up your cs server at the command line and you're set.

If you already have it loaded, then I think it's just a matter of changing your default runlevel in etc.conf(?) to 5 IIRC. Do a search on default runlevel to see what I'm talking about.

Some day I'll be rich and famous for inventing a device that allows you to stab people in the face over the internet.
September 14, 2003 7:16:59 AM

Runlevel 3 is the one for no-GUI, but full network etc.

SSH is a protocol/application for secure shell access. It's like a bit like telnet, but doesn't send data in clear text across the network.

<i>Knock Knock, Neo</i>
September 15, 2003 12:14:21 AM

There ya go :) 

Some day I'll be rich and famous for inventing a device that allows you to stab people in the face over the internet.
September 16, 2003 12:57:34 AM

You really don't need to be changing runlevels in order to go gui-less. Just choose not to install any X packages. If you're using something like Mandrake you may have to dive into the *gasp* advanced setup when installing it.
September 16, 2003 2:08:38 AM

True, but it'd probably be much easier and faster for him to do an initial boot with a GUI just to set everything up... download the CS server files etc.

Some day I'll be rich and famous for inventing a device that allows you to stab people in the face over the internet.
September 17, 2003 7:09:59 AM

Ok, I did get it working, but only for one night. It turns out my (UK) ADSL gives me a dynamic IP so whilst it was working one night absolutely fine, by the next morning my IP had changed (I've been looking and it changes once a day). Thx for the help though guys. One of my friend is getting ADSL from a different ISP soon, so we'll see whether he can use my box to host.

<A HREF="http://service.futuremark.com/compare?2k1=6752830" target="_new">Yay, I Finally broke the 12k barrier!!</A>
November 7, 2003 2:27:53 AM

Got a solution for you if you want it...no matter how often your IP changes...it will autoupdate...and you don't even need a domain. If you're still interested, give this a reply.

Oh, and by the way, if I were you...I'd run Slackware. Just my preference for no gui Linux OS.

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<b>Got any of that beer that has candy floating in it? You know, Skittlebrau? </b> <i>Homer Simpson</i>

TKS
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