tin foil antenna

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

For several years now I've been seeing these stories about wardrivers with
tin foil antennas.

If these guys can afford a car and gas, can't they buy a cheap linksys
antenna from CompUsa?

How many years has it been now?

How broke can these wardrivers possibly be?

Are common household materials the measure of the security of a network?
My new Linkys router will protect against a wireless G toaster oven...

I wish there were more tin foil hats
11 answers Last reply
More about foil antenna
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Sun, 2 May 2004, bam Bino wrote:
    > For several years now I've been seeing these stories about wardrivers with
    > tin foil antennas.
    >
    > If these guys can afford a car and gas, can't they buy a cheap linksys
    > antenna from CompUsa?

    Why would they stoop that low? The REAL wardrivers get REAL antennas made by
    the communication companies (Cushcraft, NGC/Comet, etc.), not the flimsy things
    that the WLAN computer hardware manufacturers put out.

    > How many years has it been now?

    Not nearly enough for you. Grow up.

    > How broke can these wardrivers possibly be?

    You assume that they are poor. You failed to consider that they aren't.
    Perhaps they are just CHEAP.

    > Are common household materials the measure of the security of a network?
    > My new Linkys router will protect against a wireless G toaster oven...

    Interesting, since toaster ovens don't use or produce microwaves, but use
    convection heating from an element that is heated by electric current.

    > I wish there were more tin foil hats

    You certainly need one.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Boy that was real good stuff stussy.
    I wish I were serious about my post because then your rantings would make
    sense.

    "D. Stussy" <kd6lvw@bde-arc.ampr.org> wrote in message
    news:Pine.LNX.4.58.0404231905000.70@kd6lvw.ampr.org...
    > On Sun, 2 May 2004, bam Bino wrote:
    > > For several years now I've been seeing these stories about wardrivers
    with
    > > tin foil antennas.
    > >
    > > If these guys can afford a car and gas, can't they buy a cheap linksys
    > > antenna from CompUsa?
    >
    > Why would they stoop that low? The REAL wardrivers get REAL antennas made
    by
    > the communication companies (Cushcraft, NGC/Comet, etc.), not the flimsy
    things
    > that the WLAN computer hardware manufacturers put out.
    >
    > > How many years has it been now?
    >
    > Not nearly enough for you. Grow up.
    >
    > > How broke can these wardrivers possibly be?
    >
    > You assume that they are poor. You failed to consider that they aren't.
    > Perhaps they are just CHEAP.
    >
    > > Are common household materials the measure of the security of a network?
    > > My new Linkys router will protect against a wireless G toaster oven...
    >
    > Interesting, since toaster ovens don't use or produce microwaves, but use
    > convection heating from an element that is heated by electric current.
    >
    > > I wish there were more tin foil hats
    >
    > You certainly need one.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    If I were talking about the real wardrivers with real antennas, I would have
    mentioned them. But I wasn't. You changed the subject to fit your brainwave
    patterns.
    So you could tell me to grow up. So you could have something to do besides
    clip your toenails at four in the morning.
    So you could explain microwaves and convection.

    Take a shower. Put on some fresh underpants. Open the curtains. Throw away
    all those dirty dishes.
    Put all the empty milk cartons into a big trash bag.
    Call 911 and tell them your mother's corpse has been upstairs for 2 years.
    Clear a path to the door so that they can come get you.


    "D. Stussy" <kd6lvw@bde-arc.ampr.org> wrote in message
    news:Pine.LNX.4.58.0404231905000.70@kd6lvw.ampr.org...
    > On Sun, 2 May 2004, bam Bino wrote:
    > > For several years now I've been seeing these stories about wardrivers
    with
    > > tin foil antennas.
    > >
    > > If these guys can afford a car and gas, can't they buy a cheap linksys
    > > antenna from CompUsa?
    >
    > Why would they stoop that low? The REAL wardrivers get REAL antennas made
    by
    > the communication companies (Cushcraft, NGC/Comet, etc.), not the flimsy
    things
    > that the WLAN computer hardware manufacturers put out.
    >
    > > How many years has it been now?
    >
    > Not nearly enough for you. Grow up.
    >
    > > How broke can these wardrivers possibly be?
    >
    > You assume that they are poor. You failed to consider that they aren't.
    > Perhaps they are just CHEAP.
    >
    > > Are common household materials the measure of the security of a network?
    > > My new Linkys router will protect against a wireless G toaster oven...
    >
    > Interesting, since toaster ovens don't use or produce microwaves, but use
    > convection heating from an element that is heated by electric current.
    >
    > > I wish there were more tin foil hats
    >
    > You certainly need one.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Sun, 2 May 2004 02:21:52 -0600, in alt.internet.wireless , "bam Bino"
    <ban@LKDEK.COM> wrote:

    >
    >If I were talking about the real wardrivers with real antennas, I would have
    >mentioned them. But I wasn't.

    Frankly it was pretty hard to interpret "I've been seeing these stories
    about wardrivers" in any different way. Maybe you need to state your
    question more clearly.

    >So you could explain microwaves and convection.

    I think stussy's point was that toaster ovens don't use microwaves.

    But you begin to sound like a troll. I think I'll monitor your posts ca

    (insults snipped)
    --
    Mark McIntyre
    CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
    CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc.html>


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  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    > For several years now I've been seeing these stories about wardrivers with
    > tin foil antennas.
    >
    > If these guys can afford a car and gas, can't they buy a cheap linksys
    > antenna from CompUsa?

    I think maybe your missing the point. Why spend CompUSA $$ and stuff their
    corporate pockets when you can make one out of common household materials
    that is just as good, if not better. Plus, there's a much higher geek
    factor and it's fun. One of my hobbies is making solar ovens. I could just
    cook on the grill (and still do) but I get a kick out of making dinner in a
    cardboard box lined with aluminum foil. And when I'm done cooking, I can
    put the box on my head to keep the government out of my brain. :)
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    I just wonder how many of these tin foil wardrivers are even really around
    any more?
    Just a few, like people who re-enact the ciil war because it is fun.

    my point is that we got that point 5 years ago.

    The tin foil antenna was news years ago.

    I still see this on TV and in magazines.

    The journalists are still bringing us this "disturbing story". from
    yesteryear


    "Seeker" <newsgroups@minusthespam.pcuptime.com> wrote in message
    news:WT9lc.66854$X14.50200@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
    > > For several years now I've been seeing these stories about wardrivers
    with
    > > tin foil antennas.
    > >
    > > If these guys can afford a car and gas, can't they buy a cheap linksys
    > > antenna from CompUsa?
    >
    > I think maybe your missing the point. Why spend CompUSA $$ and stuff
    their
    > corporate pockets when you can make one out of common household materials
    > that is just as good, if not better. Plus, there's a much higher geek
    > factor and it's fun. One of my hobbies is making solar ovens. I could
    just
    > cook on the grill (and still do) but I get a kick out of making dinner in
    a
    > cardboard box lined with aluminum foil. And when I'm done cooking, I can
    > put the box on my head to keep the government out of my brain. :)
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    > I just wonder how many of these tin foil wardrivers are even really around
    > any more?
    > Just a few, like people who re-enact the ciil war because it is fun.
    >
    > my point is that we got that point 5 years ago.
    >
    > The tin foil antenna was news years ago.
    >
    > I still see this on TV and in magazines.
    >
    > The journalists are still bringing us this "disturbing story". from
    > yesteryear

    I wrote an article for a local magazine awhile back on the problem of open
    access points, and did a wardrive to illustrate the point. I took
    precautions against attaching to anyone's network. Occasionally, I'll do a
    wardrive to see if the problem is getting better. Sadly, it's not improving
    much. I think the only really viable solution is for the vendors to ship
    "secure-by-default" configurations which the common user can understand.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    very true.
    I am just disturbed by the tin foil antenna story that i keep hearing about.
    Everyone in america heard this story years ago.
    Journalists need to move on


    "Seeker" <newsgroups@minusthespam.pcuptime.com> wrote in message
    news:Z8blc.67010$X14.14162@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
    > > I just wonder how many of these tin foil wardrivers are even really
    around
    > > any more?
    > > Just a few, like people who re-enact the ciil war because it is fun.
    > >
    > > my point is that we got that point 5 years ago.
    > >
    > > The tin foil antenna was news years ago.
    > >
    > > I still see this on TV and in magazines.
    > >
    > > The journalists are still bringing us this "disturbing story". from
    > > yesteryear
    >
    > I wrote an article for a local magazine awhile back on the problem of open
    > access points, and did a wardrive to illustrate the point. I took
    > precautions against attaching to anyone's network. Occasionally, I'll do
    a
    > wardrive to see if the problem is getting better. Sadly, it's not
    improving
    > much. I think the only really viable solution is for the vendors to ship
    > "secure-by-default" configurations which the common user can understand.
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Sun, 2 May 2004, bam Bino wrote:
    > Boy that was real good stuff stussy.
    > I wish I were serious about my post because then your rantings would make
    > sense.

    Thank you fopr confessing that you are an idiot and a troll. See that everyone.
    Killfile time.

    > "D. Stussy" <kd6lvw@bde-arc.ampr.org> wrote in message
    > news:Pine.LNX.4.58.0404231905000.70@kd6lvw.ampr.org...
    > > On Sun, 2 May 2004, bam Bino wrote:
    > > > For several years now I've been seeing these stories about wardrivers
    > with
    > > > tin foil antennas.
    > > >
    > > > If these guys can afford a car and gas, can't they buy a cheap linksys
    > > > antenna from CompUsa?
    > >
    > > Why would they stoop that low? The REAL wardrivers get REAL antennas made
    > by
    > > the communication companies (Cushcraft, NGC/Comet, etc.), not the flimsy
    > things
    > > that the WLAN computer hardware manufacturers put out.
    > >
    > > > How many years has it been now?
    > >
    > > Not nearly enough for you. Grow up.
    > >
    > > > How broke can these wardrivers possibly be?
    > >
    > > You assume that they are poor. You failed to consider that they aren't.
    > > Perhaps they are just CHEAP.
    > >
    > > > Are common household materials the measure of the security of a network?
    > > > My new Linkys router will protect against a wireless G toaster oven...
    > >
    > > Interesting, since toaster ovens don't use or produce microwaves, but use
    > > convection heating from an element that is heated by electric current.
    > >
    > > > I wish there were more tin foil hats
    > >
    > > You certainly need one.
    >
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Thank you for spending so much of yuor time writing to what you always
    believed was a troll.

    "D. Stussy" <kd6lvw@bde-arc.ampr.org> wrote in message
    news:Pine.LNX.4.58.0404242021530.83@kd6lvw.ampr.org...
    > On Sun, 2 May 2004, bam Bino wrote:
    > > Boy that was real good stuff stussy.
    > > I wish I were serious about my post because then your rantings would
    make
    > > sense.
    >
    > Thank you fopr confessing that you are an idiot and a troll. See that
    everyone.
    > Killfile time.
    >
    > > "D. Stussy" <kd6lvw@bde-arc.ampr.org> wrote in message
    > > news:Pine.LNX.4.58.0404231905000.70@kd6lvw.ampr.org...
    > > > On Sun, 2 May 2004, bam Bino wrote:
    > > > > For several years now I've been seeing these stories about
    wardrivers
    > > with
    > > > > tin foil antennas.
    > > > >
    > > > > If these guys can afford a car and gas, can't they buy a cheap
    linksys
    > > > > antenna from CompUsa?
    > > >
    > > > Why would they stoop that low? The REAL wardrivers get REAL antennas
    made
    > > by
    > > > the communication companies (Cushcraft, NGC/Comet, etc.), not the
    flimsy
    > > things
    > > > that the WLAN computer hardware manufacturers put out.
    > > >
    > > > > How many years has it been now?
    > > >
    > > > Not nearly enough for you. Grow up.
    > > >
    > > > > How broke can these wardrivers possibly be?
    > > >
    > > > You assume that they are poor. You failed to consider that they
    aren't.
    > > > Perhaps they are just CHEAP.
    > > >
    > > > > Are common household materials the measure of the security of a
    network?
    > > > > My new Linkys router will protect against a wireless G toaster
    oven...
    > > >
    > > > Interesting, since toaster ovens don't use or produce microwaves, but
    use
    > > > convection heating from an element that is heated by electric current.
    > > >
    > > > > I wish there were more tin foil hats
    > > >
    > > > You certainly need one.
    > >
    > >
    > >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    If it wasnt for 'Tin Foil' buffs you wouldnt have WiFi.

    Please feel free to replace 'Tin Foil' with 'Amature Radio'.

    Cheers

    "bam Bino" <ban@LKDEK.COM> wrote in message news:b8KdncIVisi3PwndRVn-vw@comcast.com...
    > For several years now I've been seeing these stories about wardrivers with
    > tin foil antennas.
    >
    > If these guys can afford a car and gas, can't they buy a cheap linksys
    > antenna from CompUsa?
    >
    > How many years has it been now?
    >
    > How broke can these wardrivers possibly be?
    >
    > Are common household materials the measure of the security of a network?
    > My new Linkys router will protect against a wireless G toaster oven...
    >
    > I wish there were more tin foil hats
    >
    >
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