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If you're pissed off at Rogers, just leave (I did)

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Anonymous
July 29, 2005 6:18:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

A a suggestion for the many of you who are pissed off at what Rogers is
doing to you:

-Switch to prepaid and forward your calls. At ten bucks a month,
consider it semi-expensive voicemail until everyone knows that you've
changed number or no longer use your cell. Just leave a voice message
with your new number or use call forwarding to your regular/new number.
Keep this up for a month or two until everyone you know or everyone
that you'd given the old number too has figured it out, then cancel. If
they hassle you for $25 to switch from a regular plan to prepaid, tell
them that you'll cancel on the spot. It might not get them to waive the
fee, but they'll give you the $25 in airtime credit so that you don't
cancel. And remember to ask for any remaining balance you have to be
transferred to your prepaid service (remember - even on a regular plan,
you're paying one month's service up front).

If you don't want to do this, another means of protest is to call and
cancel a service whenever they jack up the rate for it? 'New' long
distance rate? Call and ask to have long distance disabled on your
phone. Jacking up voicemail and call-id? If you're a student, you
should know that if you sign up your account (don't worry, you don't
have to switch anything) on the studentphonestore.com site, you get
call-id vmail for free. If not a student, call and cancel one or both
services and make a point of noting your account to indicate why you are
cancelling the service. I myself couldn't have been bothered to do this
and cancelled my account outright.

I'm still waiting for Virgin Mobile to accept activations of old BM
phones, but it looks like a pipe dream at this point. I'm not paying a
hundred bucks for yet another cheapass plastic phone. I've got quite
the collection as it is, including a few BM phones.

At this point I'm just using calling cards and pay phones whenever I'm
outside to make calls. I give people my home number and check my
messages from a payphone or work phone during the day. Those new flat
late l-distance cards charge about 5 cents a min when calling from a
payphone, so I no longer even buy those Bell prepaid payphone cards (25
cents a call translates to 5 mins at that rate. I rarely have to talk
for more than 5 mins while I'm on the go).

So, ya... there are cheaper alternatives as we wait for number
portability. I really don't think portability will solve anything
personally, since there are only three players left and none of them
will want to compete to lower their margins. We'll effectively go from
landline monopoly to wireless oligopoly... but that's a rant for another
day.

More about : pissed rogers leave

Anonymous
July 30, 2005 12:36:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

Go Go Gadget sbdot <sbdot@mailandnews.com>:
> -Switch to prepaid and forward your calls. At ten bucks a month,
> consider it semi-expensive voicemail until everyone knows that you've
> changed number or no longer use your cell. Just leave a voice message
> with your new number or use call forwarding to your regular/new number.

My understanding was that you can't keep a plan phone number when
switching to prepaid and vice-versa. Has that changed?

When I moved from Ottawa to Halifax, I called Fido to have my Ottawa
number forward to a new Halifax number, and transfer my (grandfathered)
plan to the new Halifax number. I was told I couldn't transfer a
grandfathered plan to a new number, and that I couldn't move my Ottawa
number from one SIM to my new one. So I called to cancel my service,
and after spending hours and hours on the phone with customer retention
making sure they understood exactly why I was leaving, they were able to
do it.

I've always loved Fido's customer retention. If you take the time to
say "I like the service, but it makes economic sense to quit because..."
-- they accomodate you every time. I'll miss those guys.

> If you don't want to do this, another means of protest is to call and
> cancel a service whenever they jack up the rate for it? 'New' long
> distance rate? Call and ask to have long distance disabled on your
> phone.

http://www.primus.ca/en/residential/longdistance/index.... - these
"residential" plans will let you add 5 cellphones to the plan. For
$20/mo, you get unlimited Canadian LD, you just have to get your phone
to dial a local Primus number first.

--
Rob.Russell@Canada.Com, Unicorn of Usenet & Bastard of Bandwidth
"If my son wants to be a pimp when he grows up, that's fine with me. I
hope he's a good one and enjoys it and doesn't get caught. I'll support
him in this. But if he wants to be a network administrator, he's out of
the house and not part of my family." Steve Wozniak, http://www.woz.org
Anonymous
July 30, 2005 12:36:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.fido (More info?)

Rob Russell wrote:
> http://www.primus.ca/en/residential/longdistance/index.... - these
> "residential" plans will let you add 5 cellphones to the plan. For
> $20/mo, you get unlimited Canadian LD, you just have to get your phone
> to dial a local Primus number first.

Unfortunatly, they have a gazillion access numbers depending on where you are.
(as opposed to an 800 number). So if you are travelling between Montreal and
Toronto, making a long distance involves looking up the nearest access number,
hoping it is a local call from where you are currently and then dialing that one.

It is good if you always stay in your home city, so the local access number
never changes. But if you go out of the city and there is no access number,
you are cooked.
!