19" Dell Ultrasharp flat panel--good with text?

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Am thinking of upgrading from a CRT to a LCD flat panel.
I do mostly word processing, so crisp text is a necessity. In shopping for
flat panels, I'm find that while they are good with graphics, they don't
display text, nearly as well as CRT monitors. Most have a grainy quality and
have problems with curved letters like "e and s". I'd like to get feedback on
the Dell 19" Ultrasharp. Does it live up to its name?
12 answers Last reply
More about dell ultrasharp flat panel good text
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    With CleartType enabled, it is very sharp on mine.

    "Fred Stevens" <fstev@~remove~.com> wrote in message
    news:2Yade.28$T3.369@typhoon.sonic.net...
    > Am thinking of upgrading from a CRT to a LCD flat panel.
    > I do mostly word processing, so crisp text is a necessity. In shopping for
    > flat panels, I'm find that while they are good with graphics, they don't
    > display text, nearly as well as CRT monitors. Most have a grainy quality
    > and
    > have problems with curved letters like "e and s". I'd like to get feedback
    > on
    > the Dell 19" Ultrasharp. Does it live up to its name?
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sun, 01 May 2005 20:26:38 +0000, Fred Stevens wrote:
    >
    > Am thinking of upgrading from a CRT to a LCD flat panel. I do mostly
    > word processing, so crisp text is a necessity. In shopping for flat
    > panels, I'm find that while they are good with graphics, they don't
    > display text, nearly as well as CRT monitors. Most have a grainy quality
    > and have problems with curved letters like "e and s". I'd like to get
    > feedback on the Dell 19" Ultrasharp. Does it live up to its name?

    If you only run it at it's highest native resolution it will be very
    clear, anything less than the highest resolution and you should buy a CRT.

    --
    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sun, 01 May 2005 23:14:22 GMT, Leythos <void@nowhere.lan> wrote:

    >On Sun, 01 May 2005 20:26:38 +0000, Fred Stevens wrote:
    >>
    >> Am thinking of upgrading from a CRT to a LCD flat panel. I do mostly
    >> word processing, so crisp text is a necessity. In shopping for flat
    >> panels, I'm find that while they are good with graphics, they don't
    >> display text, nearly as well as CRT monitors. Most have a grainy quality
    >> and have problems with curved letters like "e and s". I'd like to get
    >> feedback on the Dell 19" Ultrasharp. Does it live up to its name?
    >
    >If you only run it at it's highest native resolution it will be very
    >clear, anything less than the highest resolution and you should buy a CRT.

    BULLogna i run my 19 ultrasharp in 1024x768 and is ver crisp and clear
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Weebee wrote:

    > On Sun, 01 May 2005 23:14:22 GMT, Leythos <void@nowhere.lan> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>On Sun, 01 May 2005 20:26:38 +0000, Fred Stevens wrote:
    >>
    >>>Am thinking of upgrading from a CRT to a LCD flat panel. I do mostly
    >>>word processing, so crisp text is a necessity. In shopping for flat
    >>>panels, I'm find that while they are good with graphics, they don't
    >>>display text, nearly as well as CRT monitors. Most have a grainy quality
    >>>and have problems with curved letters like "e and s". I'd like to get
    >>>feedback on the Dell 19" Ultrasharp. Does it live up to its name?
    >>
    >>If you only run it at it's highest native resolution it will be very
    >>clear, anything less than the highest resolution and you should buy a CRT.
    >
    >
    > BULLogna i run my 19 ultrasharp in 1024x768 and is ver crisp and clear

    I agree, but I think it is the ultrasharp monitors that are the best. I
    have the Dell 2000FP 20". I have tried every resolution from 1600x800
    down and except for the size of the text all of it is clear - very
    clear. I liked large so my resolution is set at 800x600 except in games.

    Joan
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    In article <inu4819343rubl6i22ivr3tb8952ekj69e@4ax.com>, Weebee <not@home.com> wrote:
    >On Sun, 01 May 2005 23:14:22 GMT, Leythos <void@nowhere.lan> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 01 May 2005 20:26:38 +0000, Fred Stevens wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Am thinking of upgrading from a CRT to a LCD flat panel. I do mostly
    >>> word processing, so crisp text is a necessity. In shopping for flat
    >>> panels, I'm find that while they are good with graphics, they don't
    >>> display text, nearly as well as CRT monitors. Most have a grainy quality
    >>> and have problems with curved letters like "e and s". I'd like to get
    >>> feedback on the Dell 19" Ultrasharp. Does it live up to its name?
    >>
    >>If you only run it at it's highest native resolution it will be very
    >>clear, anything less than the highest resolution and you should buy a CRT.
    >
    >BULLogna i run my 19 ultrasharp in 1024x768 and is ver crisp and clear


    I bought a 1905 and returned it. I wasn't crazy about the look of
    the text (native res). And it was too bright(!). And the slow
    response (20ms) resulted in smearing in DVD playback. YMMV but I
    came away disenchanted with LCD's.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Joan Hansen wrote:
    > Weebee wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 01 May 2005 23:14:22 GMT, Leythos <void@nowhere.lan> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> On Sun, 01 May 2005 20:26:38 +0000, Fred Stevens wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Am thinking of upgrading from a CRT to a LCD flat panel. I do
    >>>> mostly word processing, so crisp text is a necessity. In shopping
    >>>> for flat panels, I'm find that while they are good with graphics,
    >>>> they don't display text, nearly as well as CRT monitors. Most have
    >>>> a grainy quality and have problems with curved letters like "e and
    >>>> s". I'd like to get feedback on the Dell 19" Ultrasharp. Does it
    >>>> live up to its name?
    >>>
    >>> If you only run it at it's highest native resolution it will be very
    >>> clear, anything less than the highest resolution and you should buy
    >>> a CRT.
    >>
    >>
    >> BULLogna i run my 19 ultrasharp in 1024x768 and is ver crisp and
    >> clear
    >
    > I agree, but I think it is the ultrasharp monitors that are the best.
    > I have the Dell 2000FP 20". I have tried every resolution from
    > 1600x800 down and except for the size of the text all of it is clear
    > - very clear. I liked large so my resolution is set at 800x600
    > except in games.
    > Joan

    A previous poster referred to slow pixel response causing smearing in
    DVD playback. I find this improbably with even a slow monitor. What do
    you see in gaming?

    Q
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I've been debating a LCD purchase for a year and a half. As important as my
    need for a great display of digital photos is, I also despise fuzzy text!
    So, I wanted it all...great looking digital photos and crisp, clear text.
    In the last year, I've brought home 2 LCDs, had them plugged in for less
    than 5 minutes before boxing them back up. I configured my newly purchased
    Dell system with the 20" UltraSharp FPW (Widescreen). I'm 99% satisfied
    with my choice :) The photos are clear, sharp and richly colored. Text is
    crisp and clear. Contrast and brightness is very good. The only thing I'm
    not thrilled about and I've yet to decide if it's bothersome enough to
    exchange it for the regular 20" is that all the objects in the photos are
    wider than they really are. I got used to that on our 65" widescreen TV.
    So far I'm not "used to it" on this monitor. But I love everything else
    about this monitor so much, I may just put up with it. I'm using a
    1280x1024 but 1280x768 is great too. I haven't noticed any 'smearing" of
    text when viewing a DVD.
    Monica
    "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in message
    news:HI-dnSL5GY4tSxvfRVn-rA@comcast.com...

    > A previous poster referred to slow pixel response causing smearing in DVD
    > playback. I find this improbably with even a slow monitor. What do you
    > see in gaming?
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    In article <HI-dnSL5GY4tSxvfRVn-rA@comcast.com>, "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote:

    >A previous poster referred to slow pixel response causing smearing in
    >DVD playback. I find this improbably with even a slow monitor. What do
    >you see in gaming?

    That was me. I kid you not, it clearly had problems with Star
    Wars IV in the early scenes with Darth Vadar and his stooges
    dressed in black walking and talking. Both with analog and
    digital input. If it wasn't smearing, it was some artifact where
    the black-white transition was unacceptable. I tried it with my
    old Samsung CRT and it had no problem. So I must attribute it to
    the LCD monitor (1905FP, 20ms quoted response).

    I tried one game (a racing sim) and it seemed okay there, but I
    wasn't 100% sure. Talking to another gamer, he said okay for
    racing sims, not good for fast FPS's. He also mentioned problems
    with DVD playback.

    So, buy at your own risk.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Monica" <nospam@guess.com> wrote in news:RSBhe.5062$Db6.406@okepread05:

    > I
    > configured my newly purchased Dell system with the 20" UltraSharp FPW
    > (Widescreen).

    > The only thing I'm not thrilled about
    > and I've yet to decide if it's bothersome enough to exchange it for
    > the regular 20" is that all the objects in the photos are wider than
    > they really are.

    > I'm using a
    > 1280x1024 but 1280x768 is great too.

    Some LCDs have a native resolution of 1280x1024,
    yet the LCD's size is a 4:3 ratio, which means
    you have to make a sacrifice when using such
    LCDs: either accept 'non-round circles', or
    operate the LCD at a non-native resolution.

    When using an LCD for viewing things like photos or
    drawings, where it's important that a circle displays
    as a circle, not an ellipse, you have to set the
    display resolution so the X/Y ratio matches the
    physical size of the LCD.

    Look in the manual for your monitor and find the
    size of the LCD(e.g. X inches/cms by Y inches/cms).
    If that ratio is 4:3, then select a display resolution
    that has a 4:3 ratio, such as 1280x960, but if the
    ratio is 5:4, then you would use 1280x1024.

    --
    Dave Patton
    Canadian Coordinator, Degree Confluence Project
    http://www.confluence.org/
    My website: http://members.shaw.ca/davepatton/
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Dave Patton" <spam@trap.invalid> wrote in message news:Xns96575B2715039mrzaphoddirectcaold@24.71.223.159...
    > "Monica" <nospam@guess.com> wrote in news:RSBhe.5062$Db6.406@okepread05:
    >
    >> [] with the 20" UltraSharp FPW (Widescreen) []
    >
    >> The only thing I'm not thrilled about and I've yet to decide if it's
    >> bothersome enough to exchange it for the regular 20" is that all the
    >> objects in the photos are wider than they really are.
    >
    >> I'm using a 1280x1024 but 1280x768 is great too.
    >
    > Some LCDs have a native resolution of 1280x1024, yet the LCD's size
    > is a 4:3 ratio, which means you have to make a sacrifice when using such
    > LCDs: either accept 'non-round circles', or operate the LCD at a non
    > native resolution.

    I don't believe I've ever come across such a display, but should
    one exist, I'd agree that there would be the inherent problem you
    describe.

    > Look in the manual for your monitor and find the size of the LCD
    > (e.g. X inches/cms by Y inches/cms). If that ratio is 4:3, then select a
    > display resolution that has a 4:3 ratio, such as 1280x960, but if the
    > ratio is 5:4, then you would use 1280x1024.

    FWIW, below is a cheat sheet I created for comparing various displays.


    Monitor Display Width Display Height Aspect Ratio Native Res
    17" CRT 12.5 9.4 4:3 N/A
    19" CRT 14 10.5 4:3 N/A
    1704FPT LCD 13.3 10.6 5:4 1280x1024
    1801FP LCD 14.1 11.3 5:4 1280x1024
    1905FP LCD 14.8 11.9 5:4 1280x1024
    2001FP LCD 16.1 12.1 4:3 1600x1200
    2005WFP LCD 17 10.7 8:5 1680x1050


    Logical PPI data (hLPPI = hRes/dWidth, vLPPI = vRes/dHeight). Numbers in
    parentheses are sizes relative to 19" CRT at 1024x768. Asterisks denote
    resolutions which are very close to display area in terms of aspect ratio.

    17" CRT
    1024x768: hLPPI = 81.92, vLPPI = 81.7 (89.28%, 89.52%) *
    1152x864: hLPPI = 92.16, vLPPI = 91.91 (79.36%, 79.57%) *
    1280x1024: hLPPI = 102.4, vLPPI = 108.94 (71.43%, 67.14%)

    19" CRT
    1024x768: hLPPI = 73.14, vLPPI = 73.14 (100%, 100%) *
    1152x864: hLPPI = 82.29, vLPPI = 82.29 (88.89%, 88.89%) *
    1280x720: hLPPI = 91.43, vLPPI = 68.57 (80%, 106.66%)
    1280x768: hLPPI = 91.43, vLPPI = 73.14 (80%, 100%)
    1280x960: hLPPI = 91.43, vLPPI = 91.43 (80%, 80%) *
    1280x1024: hLPPI = 91.43, vLPPI = 97.52 (80%, 75%)
    1600x900: hLPPI = 114.29, vLPPI = 85.71 (64%, 85.33%)
    1600x1024: hLPPI = 114.29, vLPPI = 97.52 (64%, 75%)
    1600x1200: hLPPI = 114.29, vLPPI = 114.29 (64%, 64%) *

    1704FPT LCD
    1024x768: hLPPI = 76.99, vLPPI = 72.45 (95%, 100.95%)
    1152x864: hLPPI = 86.62, vLPPI = 81.51 (84.44%, 89.73%)
    1280x1024: hLPPI = 96.24, vLPPI = 96.6 (76%, 75.71%) *

    1801FP LCD
    1024x768: hLPPI = 72.62, vLPPI = 67.96 (100.71%, 107.61%)
    1152x864: hLPPI = 81.7, vLPPI = 76.46 (89.52%, 95.66%)
    1280x1024: hLPPI = 90.78, vLPPI = 90.62 (80.57%, 80.71%) *

    1905FP LCD
    1024x768: hLPPI = 69.19, vLPPI = 64.54 (105.71%, 113.33%)
    1152x864: hLPPI = 77.84, vLPPI = 72.61 (93.96%, 100.74%)
    1280x1024: hLPPI = 86.49, vLPPI = 86.05 (84.57%, 85%) *

    2001FP LCD
    1024x768: hLPPI = 63.6, vLPPI = 63.47 (115%, 115.23%) *
    1152x864: hLPPI = 71.55, vLPPI = 71.4 (102.22%, 102.43%) *
    1280x720: hLPPI = 79.5, vLPPI = 59.5 (92%, 122.92%)
    1280x768: hLPPI = 79.5, vLPPI = 63.47 (92%, 115.23%)
    1280x960: hLPPI = 79.5, vLPPI = 79.34 (92%, 92.19%) *
    1280x1024: hLPPI = 79.5, vLPPI = 84.63 (92%, 86.43%)
    1600x900: hLPPI = 99.38, vLPPI = 74.38 (73.6%, 98.33%)
    1600x1024: hLPPI = 99.38, vLPPI = 84.63 (73.6%, 86.43%)
    1600x1200: hLPPI = 99.38, vLPPI = 99.17 (73.6%, 73.75%) *

    2005WFP LCD
    1024x768: hLPPI = 60.24, vLPPI = 71.78 (121.42%, 101.9%)
    1152x864: hLPPI = 67.76, vLPPI = 80.75 (107.93%, 90.58%)
    1280x720: hLPPI = 75.29, vLPPI = 67.29 (97.14%, 108.69%)
    1280x768: hLPPI = 75.29, vLPPI = 71.78 (97.14%, 101.9%)
    1280x960: hLPPI = 75.29, vLPPI = 89.72 (97.14%, 81.52%)
    1280x1024: hLPPI = 75.29, vLPPI = 95.7 (97.14%, 76.43%)
    1600x900: hLPPI = 94.12, vLPPI = 84.11 (77.71%, 86.96%)
    1600x1024: hLPPI = 94.12, vLPPI = 95.7 (77.71%, 76.43%)
    1600x1200: hLPPI = 94.12, vLPPI = 112.15 (77.71%, 65.22%)
    1680x1050: hLPPI = 98.82, vLPPI = 98.13 (74.01%, 74.53%) *
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I didn't reply to this (and the above) reply because it was like reading a
    foreign language <lol> Hadn't a CLUE what you guys were talking about :o
    However, I have figured out that if I do want to view a realistic view of a
    picture (perhaps during a digital editing), I can use the OSD and change my
    monitor's view to either 1:1 or "aspect".
    Monica
    "User N" <usern@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:Cf6dnfX4vfGHXRrfRVn-iQ@comcast.com...
    >
    > "Dave Patton" <spam@trap.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:Xns96575B2715039mrzaphoddirectcaold@24.71.223.159...
    > 2005WFP LCD
    > 1024x768: hLPPI = 60.24, vLPPI = 71.78 (121.42%, 101.9%)
    > 1152x864: hLPPI = 67.76, vLPPI = 80.75 (107.93%, 90.58%)
    > 1280x720: hLPPI = 75.29, vLPPI = 67.29 (97.14%, 108.69%)
    > 1280x768: hLPPI = 75.29, vLPPI = 71.78 (97.14%, 101.9%)
    > 1280x960: hLPPI = 75.29, vLPPI = 89.72 (97.14%, 81.52%)
    > 1280x1024: hLPPI = 75.29, vLPPI = 95.7 (97.14%, 76.43%)
    > 1600x900: hLPPI = 94.12, vLPPI = 84.11 (77.71%, 86.96%)
    > 1600x1024: hLPPI = 94.12, vLPPI = 95.7 (77.71%, 76.43%)
    > 1600x1200: hLPPI = 94.12, vLPPI = 112.15 (77.71%, 65.22%)
    > 1680x1050: hLPPI = 98.82, vLPPI = 98.13 (74.01%, 74.53%) *
    >
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sun, 15 May 2005 11:05:13 GMT, dm@nospam.com (Dave) wrote:

    >In article <HI-dnSL5GY4tSxvfRVn-rA@comcast.com>, "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote:
    >
    >>A previous poster referred to slow pixel response causing smearing in
    >>DVD playback. I find this improbably with even a slow monitor. What do
    >>you see in gaming?
    >
    >That was me. I kid you not, it clearly had problems with Star
    >Wars IV in the early scenes with Darth Vadar and his stooges
    >dressed in black walking and talking. Both with analog and
    >digital input. If it wasn't smearing, it was some artifact where
    >the black-white transition was unacceptable. I tried it with my
    >old Samsung CRT and it had no problem. So I must attribute it to
    >the LCD monitor (1905FP, 20ms quoted response).
    >
    >I tried one game (a racing sim) and it seemed okay there, but I
    >wasn't 100% sure. Talking to another gamer, he said okay for
    >racing sims, not good for fast FPS's. He also mentioned problems
    >with DVD playback.
    >
    >So, buy at your own risk.

    The conversation strayed a bit from dispaying text to now discussing
    viewing of movies (DVD's). Seems though that it would depend on what
    else you'll be doing with it besides merely text.

    20ms responce time shouldnt effect text (IMO) nor would that be a
    problem for static text (could be for scrolling text).
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