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Nextel Privacy

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Anonymous
April 16, 2004 3:53:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

I have a i1000plus provided by my employer which has recently broken. I'm
soon to get a replacement i730. I thought I would do a little pre-research
on the phone and see that it has the GPS capability, this got me thinking
about what information the account administrator has access to. Can the
person in charge of our Nextel account casually find coordinates on my
phone? Creepy! In hindsight, what are the other privacy issues involved
with being under a managed plan? I've never had a cell phone except Nextels
from work so I dont know what kind of info is on a billing statement. I'm
sure they see incoming and out going calls but how about web-sent text
messages? How about direct-connect? Do they see every direct connect on
the statement? Yikes, the paranoia bug!

More about : nextel privacy

Anonymous
April 16, 2004 3:53:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

"MAT" <marcoatRM_SPAM@DEL_SPAmsnotmail.com> wrote in message
news:YfWdnQqG7aABxeLdRVn-sw@comcast.com...
> I have a i1000plus provided by my employer which has recently broken. I'm
> soon to get a replacement i730. I thought I would do a little
pre-research
> on the phone and see that it has the GPS capability, this got me thinking
> about what information the account administrator has access to. Can the
> person in charge of our Nextel account casually find coordinates on my
> phone? Creepy! In hindsight, what are the other privacy issues involved
> with being under a managed plan? I've never had a cell phone except
Nextels
> from work so I dont know what kind of info is on a billing statement. I'm
> sure they see incoming and out going calls but how about web-sent text
> messages? How about direct-connect? Do they see every direct connect on
> the statement? Yikes, the paranoia bug!
>
>

Well, if the guy paying the bill asks for GPS tracking capability, I'm sure
he'd get it. As far as the other stuff goes, they might see the DC minutes,
but I can't remember if they get DC detail.

BTW- don't expect ANY privacy on an employer-provided phone. In most cases,
they never look at this stuff, but then again.........
Anonymous
April 16, 2004 11:37:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

Nextel or the NSA for that matter don't need the GPS in your phone to
pinpoint your location
it can easily be obtained by triangulating your cellphone signal between two
towers



"MAT" <marcoatRM_SPAM@DEL_SPAmsnotmail.com> wrote in message
news:YfWdnQqG7aABxeLdRVn-sw@comcast.com...
> I have a i1000plus provided by my employer which has recently broken. I'm
> soon to get a replacement i730. I thought I would do a little
pre-research
> on the phone and see that it has the GPS capability, this got me thinking
> about what information the account administrator has access to. Can the
> person in charge of our Nextel account casually find coordinates on my
> phone? Creepy! In hindsight, what are the other privacy issues involved
> with being under a managed plan? I've never had a cell phone except
Nextels
> from work so I dont know what kind of info is on a billing statement. I'm
> sure they see incoming and out going calls but how about web-sent text
> messages? How about direct-connect? Do they see every direct connect on
> the statement? Yikes, the paranoia bug!
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
April 16, 2004 11:37:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

In message <<407f6313@news.012.net.il>> "Offri" <offri@nomail.com> did
ramble:

>Nextel or the NSA for that matter don't need the GPS in your phone to
>pinpoint your location
>it can easily be obtained by triangulating your cellphone signal between two
>towers

Sure, but this isn't a service Nextel offers to your typical PHB.
However, GPS *is*

--
They'll say, 'You can't joke about rape. Rape's not funny.'
I can prove to you that rape is funny. Picture Porky Pig raping Elmer Fudd.
See? Hey, why do you think they call him Porky?
-- George Carlin
April 16, 2004 11:37:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

It actually takes 3 towers...that's why it's called "TRIangulation" ;-)

Mark

"Offri" <offri@nomail.com> wrote in message news:<407f6313@news.012.net.il>...
> Nextel or the NSA for that matter don't need the GPS in your phone to
> pinpoint your location
> it can easily be obtained by triangulating your cellphone signal between two
> towers
>
>
>
> "MAT" <marcoatRM_SPAM@DEL_SPAmsnotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:YfWdnQqG7aABxeLdRVn-sw@comcast.com...
> > I have a i1000plus provided by my employer which has recently broken. I'm
> > soon to get a replacement i730. I thought I would do a little
> pre-research
> > on the phone and see that it has the GPS capability, this got me thinking
> > about what information the account administrator has access to. Can the
> > person in charge of our Nextel account casually find coordinates on my
> > phone? Creepy! In hindsight, what are the other privacy issues involved
> > with being under a managed plan? I've never had a cell phone except
> Nextels
> > from work so I dont know what kind of info is on a billing statement. I'm
> > sure they see incoming and out going calls but how about web-sent text
> > messages? How about direct-connect? Do they see every direct connect on
> > the statement? Yikes, the paranoia bug!
> >
> >
Anonymous
April 16, 2004 11:55:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

Cellular detail: Yes.

DC Detail: Not on a 'regular' bill; don't know if it is available if
asked for or not

2-way text: This is stored on the Nextel WAP servers so I guess your
boss could get to it if access was setup correctly and your phone was
set to save sent messages

GPS: The software in the 730 is designed just for the use you suggest;
a company wants to keep track of its phones (and users) using GPS
data. The phones can be setup so that a PIN is required to access the
GPS configuration screens on the phone preventing the end user from
turning off the GPS receiver. From there, Nextel offers software to
track and report on GPS phones in a fleet/account. There are 3rd
party offerings as well. When you get your phone just try to access
the GPS screen in the menu and turn off the GPS. IF you can get to it
you are OK; if not then it is safe to assume your company may be
tracking the phone.


"MAT" <marcoatRM_SPAM@DEL_SPAmsnotmail.com> wrote in message news:<YfWdnQqG7aABxeLdRVn-sw@comcast.com>...
> I have a i1000plus provided by my employer which has recently broken. I'm
> soon to get a replacement i730. I thought I would do a little pre-research
> on the phone and see that it has the GPS capability, this got me thinking
> about what information the account administrator has access to. Can the
> person in charge of our Nextel account casually find coordinates on my
> phone? Creepy! In hindsight, what are the other privacy issues involved
> with being under a managed plan? I've never had a cell phone except Nextels
> from work so I dont know what kind of info is on a billing statement. I'm
> sure they see incoming and out going calls but how about web-sent text
> messages? How about direct-connect? Do they see every direct connect on
> the statement? Yikes, the paranoia bug!
Anonymous
April 16, 2004 3:14:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

> Cellular detail: Yes.
>
> DC Detail: Not on a 'regular' bill; don't know if it is available if
> asked for or not
>
> 2-way text: This is stored on the Nextel WAP servers so I guess your
> boss could get to it if access was setup correctly and your phone was
> set to save sent messages
>
> GPS: The software in the 730 is designed just for the use you suggest;
> a company wants to keep track of its phones (and users) using GPS
> data. The phones can be setup so that a PIN is required to access the
> GPS configuration screens on the phone preventing the end user from
> turning off the GPS receiver. From there, Nextel offers software to
> track and report on GPS phones in a fleet/account. There are 3rd
> party offerings as well. When you get your phone just try to access
> the GPS screen in the menu and turn off the GPS. IF you can get to it
> you are OK; if not then it is safe to assume your company may be
> tracking the phone.

Thanks for the detailed feedback! I don't think the account admin would go
out of the way to check the GPS info and I'm relieved that I can disable the
gps if I want to. She gave me the option of the current Nextel phones and
the i730 was reasonabley priced so I chose it. It's doubtful she would
implement any fleet tracking feature at an extra cost. I won't get any
extra online access or 2 way text messaging, but what about the freebie 1
way messages from the web? My wife uses it a lot and though not exactly
'confidential', I don't like the idea of somebody knowing what movie to get
or that I need to stop by the store to get some milk, and every once in a
while a racy message which I would choose to keep between us!
Anonymous
April 17, 2004 5:45:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

In message <<35b1619d.0404160401.445355c2@posting.google.com>>
KS4VT@yahoo.com (MarkF) did ramble:

>It actually takes 3 towers...that's why it's called "TRIangulation" ;-)

Will normal triangulation, two towers can narrow it down to 2 possible
locations with a large margin of error. The two towers, plus the cell
phone form the triangle.

However, a single cell tower typically has 6 antenna, each facing
different directions. This makes it possible for a single tower to give
you a general direction. The second tower also gives you a general
direction which reduces the margin of error.
--
Nobody ever lost money underestimating the human intelligence.
-- P.T.Barnum
April 17, 2004 7:57:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

DevilsPGD <lalalaNOSPAM@crazyhat.net> wrote in message news:<z_%fc.13316223$Of.2218209@news.easynews.com>...
> In message <<35b1619d.0404160401.445355c2@posting.google.com>>
> KS4VT@yahoo.com (MarkF) did ramble:
>
> >It actually takes 3 towers...that's why it's called "TRIangulation" ;-)
>
> Will normal triangulation, two towers can narrow it down to 2 possible
> locations with a large margin of error. The two towers, plus the cell
> phone form the triangle.
>
> However, a single cell tower typically has 6 antenna, each facing
> different directions. This makes it possible for a single tower to give
> you a general direction. The second tower also gives you a general
> direction which reduces the margin of error.

The only part that is correct is that the carrier can utilize the
sectors to give an approximate direction, but it still takes 3 towers
to give an accurate location such as a GPS would give.

Why would you bother using 2 towers if it gives you a LARGE margin of
error? Isn't the goal here to find the person/phone.

I still stand by my previous statement that it takes 3
towers/receiving locations to do accurate TRIangulation as the phone
is the target device.
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 5:41:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

In message <<35b1619d.0404170257.67b25d34@posting.google.com>>
KS4VT@yahoo.com (MarkF) did ramble:

>> >It actually takes 3 towers...that's why it's called "TRIangulation" ;-)
>>
>> Will normal triangulation, two towers can narrow it down to 2 possible
>> locations with a large margin of error. The two towers, plus the cell
>> phone form the triangle.
>>
>> However, a single cell tower typically has 6 antenna, each facing
>> different directions. This makes it possible for a single tower to give
>> you a general direction. The second tower also gives you a general
>> direction which reduces the margin of error.
>
>The only part that is correct is that the carrier can utilize the
>sectors to give an approximate direction, but it still takes 3 towers
>to give an accurate location such as a GPS would give.
>
>Why would you bother using 2 towers if it gives you a LARGE margin of
>error? Isn't the goal here to find the person/phone.
>
>I still stand by my previous statement that it takes 3
>towers/receiving locations to do accurate TRIangulation as the phone
>is the target device.

It depends on the goal. Accuracy to the meter or less is not always
required.

--
I'm sorry sir, you can't park your van on the diving board.
Anonymous
April 28, 2004 5:00:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

MarkF wrote:
> It actually takes 3 towers...that's why it's called "TRIangulation"
> ;-)

Nope. With ordinary radio triangulation, it takes 2 receivers with highly
directional antennas. If on a map you draw a line indicating the direction
where a transmitter is coming from, where the lines intersect shows where
the transmitter is. (Of course, should the transmitter be located directly
on the same line that connects where the receivers are, this ain't gonna
work.) The problem is that as DevilsPGD posted, a cell tower typically has 6
antennas (meaning none is highly directional), and thus can only give a
general idea as to the direction the phone is located, with a significant
margin of error. Thus even with 4 cell towers, it may not be possible to
pinpoint a phone with a high degree of accuracy; certainly nothing on the
level of GPS.
--
http://www.dextromethorphan.ws/
For information about the psychedelic drug DXM, including dangers.
Anonymous
May 3, 2004 1:28:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel (More info?)

As those guys are going on and on about how many towers it takes to
track you.... Yes GPS does mean that they can track you. But more
than likely they will choose not to track you. It is $15 a month
extra for the feature and that is taking into account that they are
already spending at least $40 now. Nextel does offer a non-GPS
version for the older phones like the i1000 like the other guys are
arguing about. Same price only it is not as accurate as GPS(could be
up to 15 miles off). Your i730 will use this when it can not see a
GPS satellite(like in your house).


"MAT" <marcoatRM_SPAM@DEL_SPAmsnotmail.com> wrote in message news:<YfWdnQqG7aABxeLdRVn-sw@comcast.com>...
> I have a i1000plus provided by my employer which has recently broken. I'm
> soon to get a replacement i730. I thought I would do a little pre-research
> on the phone and see that it has the GPS capability, this got me thinking
> about what information the account administrator has access to. Can the
> person in charge of our Nextel account casually find coordinates on my
> phone? Creepy! In hindsight, what are the other privacy issues involved
> with being under a managed plan? I've never had a cell phone except Nextels
> from work so I dont know what kind of info is on a billing statement. I'm
> sure they see incoming and out going calls but how about web-sent text
> messages? How about direct-connect? Do they see every direct connect on
> the statement? Yikes, the paranoia bug!
!