NEXTEL Flarion outperforms CDMA 1x EV-DO

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

http://www.rcrnews.com/cgi-bin/news.pl?newsId=17740

Nextel Communications Inc.'s decision earlier this week to expand its
wireless broadband network trial in the Raleigh, N.C., market may have
proven well founded as network testing conducted by RBC Capital
Markets indicated Flarion Technologies' Flash-OFDM based technology is
providing data speeds nearly three times faster than CDMA2000 1x EV-DO
networks and equal to wireline-based broadband offerings.
11 answers Last reply
More about nextel flarion outperforms cdma
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    On 17 Apr 2004 04:34:05 -0700, KS4VT@yahoo.com (MarkF) wrote:

    >http://www.rcrnews.com/cgi-bin/news.pl?newsId=17740
    >
    >Nextel Communications Inc.'s decision earlier this week to expand its
    >wireless broadband network trial in the Raleigh, N.C., market may have
    >proven well founded as network testing conducted by RBC Capital
    >Markets indicated Flarion Technologies' Flash-OFDM based technology is
    >providing data speeds nearly three times faster than CDMA2000 1x EV-DO
    >networks and equal to wireline-based broadband offerings.

    If you look at the central part of that link you'll see the text:

    "The speeds were triple the 329 kbps average throughput similar
    testing produced using Verizon Wireless?f EV-DO network/..."

    But it uses 4 times the bandwidth. So, it's less spectrally efficient.
    Spectrum costs $$$.

    Since Nextel's rolling out the service on MMDS bands (not cellular),
    if Nextel doesn't have MMDS spectrum in your market, don't plan on
    having the Flarion based service. There will be very few markets that
    ever have it.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    <paul@wren.cc.kux.edu> wrote in message
    news:s69280tcfgtftg9hcfds3m31ulle94j5mn@4ax.com...

    > If you look at the central part of that link you'll see the text:
    >
    > "The speeds were triple the 329 kbps average throughput similar
    > testing produced using Verizon Wireless?f EV-DO network/..."
    >
    > But it uses 4 times the bandwidth. So, it's less spectrally efficient.
    > Spectrum costs $$$.
    >
    > Since Nextel's rolling out the service on MMDS bands (not cellular),
    > if Nextel doesn't have MMDS spectrum in your market, don't plan on
    > having the Flarion based service. There will be very few markets that
    > ever have it.

    I didn't see the MMDS part in the article. Did you find that somewhere else?
    Since one of Nextel's problems is lack of spectrum it would seem they would
    need to run it in some other band.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    Sounds like "Vaporware"....will believe it when it's REALLY available.
    Nextel's coverage in rural areas and off the "beaten" path has been dismal
    to say the least. I won't hold my breath waiting for them to impliment THIS
    feature anytime soon.....Eddie (was a Nextel customer for 18 months)

    "MarkF" <KS4VT@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:35b1619d.0404170334.59db1c79@posting.google.com...
    > http://www.rcrnews.com/cgi-bin/news.pl?newsId=17740
    >
    > Nextel Communications Inc.'s decision earlier this week to expand its
    > wireless broadband network trial in the Raleigh, N.C., market may have
    > proven well founded as network testing conducted by RBC Capital
    > Markets indicated Flarion Technologies' Flash-OFDM based technology is
    > providing data speeds nearly three times faster than CDMA2000 1x EV-DO
    > networks and equal to wireline-based broadband offerings.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    On Sat, 17 Apr 2004 09:02:13 -0400, "George" <George@nospam.invalid>
    wrote:

    >
    ><paul@wren.cc.kux.edu> wrote in message
    >news:s69280tcfgtftg9hcfds3m31ulle94j5mn@4ax.com...
    >
    >> If you look at the central part of that link you'll see the text:
    >>
    >> "The speeds were triple the 329 kbps average throughput similar
    >> testing produced using Verizon Wireless?f EV-DO network/..."
    >>
    >> But it uses 4 times the bandwidth. So, it's less spectrally efficient.
    >> Spectrum costs $$$.
    >>
    >> Since Nextel's rolling out the service on MMDS bands (not cellular),
    >> if Nextel doesn't have MMDS spectrum in your market, don't plan on
    >> having the Flarion based service. There will be very few markets that
    >> ever have it.
    >
    >I didn't see the MMDS part in the article. Did you find that somewhere else?
    >Since one of Nextel's problems is lack of spectrum it would seem they would
    >need to run it in some other band.

    http://www.dailywireless.org/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=2031

    Look about 1/4 way down the page.

    http://www.equitekcapital.com/Investorinfo/Webpagecontent/flarion_articles/flarionrcrwireless111003.htm

    Looks like they've shifted to 1.25 MHz of spectrum instead of 5. (They
    used to offer it in 5 MHz.)

    http://www.flarion.com/news/pr_2004/031704.asp
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    The whole point is that they already have made it available and it is
    the fastest mobile wireless data service to date. The trial in N.C.
    was recently 'cut short' in that it was working so well they have
    started accepting paying customers.

    Pricing was posted in another thread but it ran from $35/month for
    slower MB limited plans to $80 for full speed unlimited plans.

    Does anyone have a list of markets in which Nextel owns the spectrum
    to support this service?

    -D

    "Eddie Haskel" <wiseguy@clever.com> wrote in message news:<hJegc.52482$Z4.38691@newssvr25.news.prodigy.com>...
    > Sounds like "Vaporware"....will believe it when it's REALLY available.
    > Nextel's coverage in rural areas and off the "beaten" path has been dismal
    > to say the least. I won't hold my breath waiting for them to impliment THIS
    > feature anytime soon.....Eddie (was a Nextel customer for 18 months)
    >
    > "MarkF" <KS4VT@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:35b1619d.0404170334.59db1c79@posting.google.com...
    > > http://www.rcrnews.com/cgi-bin/news.pl?newsId=17740
    > >
    > > Nextel Communications Inc.'s decision earlier this week to expand its
    > > wireless broadband network trial in the Raleigh, N.C., market may have
    > > proven well founded as network testing conducted by RBC Capital
    > > Markets indicated Flarion Technologies' Flash-OFDM based technology is
    > > providing data speeds nearly three times faster than CDMA2000 1x EV-DO
    > > networks and equal to wireline-based broadband offerings.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    Try as I may, I cannot uncover a definitive answer as to which
    spectrum Nextel is utilizing for its trial deployment of FLASH-OFDM in
    the Research Triangle metro. Three possibilities seem to emerge: SMR
    800, MMDS, or PCS.

    Additionally, the Flarion documentation is somewhat vague as to
    whether FLASH-OFDM deployment requires 1.25 MHz paired FDD
    (frequency-division duplex) for a total spectrum outlay of 2.5 MHz or
    625 KHz paired FDD for a total of 1.25 MHz. Flarion ambiguously
    states 1.25 MHz FDD, though I would suspect the former, that 1.25 MHz
    "green field" spectrum is required for each of the forward &
    reverse-links.

    As its name would suggest - Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing
    - it is a frequency-division interface, but the precise tonal spacing
    required for frequency-orthogonality eliminates as a possibility the
    interleaved portions of Nextel's SMR 800 MHz spectrum - the same
    spectrum intertwined w/ public safety channels that Nextel wishes to
    return to the FCC in exchange for a nationwide 10 MHz PCS license.
    However, assuming that disregard of the established 25 KHz
    channelization would be permitted under SMR regulations, the
    contiguous 5 MHz paired of the SMR 800 A-C licenses or the 3.75 MHz
    paired of the D-FF licenses - all of which are typically held by
    Nextel - could be utilized for FLASH-OFDM deployment, albeit at the
    great expense of iDEN capacity, which makes SMR spectrum utilization
    unlikely.

    http://wireless.fcc.gov/auctions/data/bandplans/800smrband.pdf

    As Craig has astutely pointed out, Nextel has acquired a sizeable
    holding of MMDS (Multichannel Multipoint Distribution System)
    spectrum, largely through the bankruptcy purchase of WorldCom's MMDS
    assets. The MMDS spectrum in the 2.6 GHz band was not originally
    designed for two-way transmission. It is not paired FDD. But two-way
    data communication has been approved by the FCC. And the 6 MHz
    channelization (designed for 6 MHz NTSC analog TV channels) is large
    enough that FLASH-OFDM FDD operation could possibly be contained w/in
    a channel or certainly w/in separate channels w/in the MMDS band.

    http://wireless.fcc.gov/auctions/data/bandplans/mdsband.pdf

    Finally, others have reported that Nextel is leasing PCS spectrum for
    the FLASH-OFDM trial in Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill. The PCS A & PCS B
    licenses in MTA006 are AT&TWS & Cingular, respectively, neither of
    which would be likely to lease any of their spectrum to competitor
    Nextel. The same could be said of Sprint PCS, the PCS D licensee in
    BTA368. That leaves the BTA368 PCS C, PCS E, & PCS F licensees:
    Urban Comm - North Carolina, ALLTEL, & Comscape Telecommunications of
    Raleigh-Durham, respectively.

    http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/license.jsp?licKey=9049
    http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/license.jsp?licKey=9723
    http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/license.jsp?licKey=10068

    ALLTEL as well is certainly a competitor to Nextel, but ALLTEL
    controls the Cellular B-side license in the Raleigh-Durham CMA, hence
    its PCS spectrum in that market could be expendable. The more likely
    contender, though, would be either of the two entrepreneurial
    companies, about which little information seems to be available.

    Andrew
    --
    Andrew Shepherd
    cinema@ku.edu
    cinema@sprintpcs.com
    http://www.ku.edu/home/cinema/
  7. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    On 21 Apr 2004 12:21:46 -0700, cinema@ku.edu (Andrew Shepherd) wrote:

    >Try as I may, I cannot uncover a definitive answer as to which
    >spectrum Nextel is utilizing for its trial deployment of FLASH-OFDM in
    >the Research Triangle metro. Three possibilities seem to emerge: SMR
    >800, MMDS, or PCS.

    PCS.


    Regulators Mulling Nextel Spectrum Proposal
    BY REINHARDT KRAUSE, INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY, Monday, March 8, 2004

    <snip>

    "However, Nextel is testing a wireless data network developed by startup
    Flarion Technologies. The trial, in North Carolina, uses gear that operates
    at 1.9 GHz."

    <snip>


    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WFHSG/message/5540


    --
    John Bartley K7AAY http://celdata.cjb.net
    This post quad-ROT-13 encrypted; reading it violates the DMCA.
    Nobody but a fool goes into a federal counterrorism operation without duct tape - Richard Preston, THE COBRA EVENT.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    yeltrabnhoj@email.com wrote in message news:<4086e51e.21787468@news.individual.de>...

    > PCS.
    >
    >
    > Regulators Mulling Nextel Spectrum Proposal
    > BY REINHARDT KRAUSE, INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY, Monday, March 8, 2004
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > "However, Nextel is testing a wireless data network developed by startup
    > Flarion Technologies. The trial, in North Carolina, uses gear that operates
    > at 1.9 GHz."
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >
    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WFHSG/message/5540

    MMDS.

    "Nextel's market trial is using Flarion in the MMDS (2.5-2.6GHz) band."

    http://www.dailywireless.org/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=2031

    So which is it - leased PCS or licensed MMDS? The ambiguity persists...

    Andrew
    --
    Andrew Shepherd
    cinema@ku.edu
    cinema@sprintpcs.com
    http://www.ku.edu/home/cinema/
  9. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    See More info below-

    Andrew Shepherd <cinema@ku.edu> wrote:

    > Try as I may, I cannot uncover a definitive answer as to which
    > spectrum Nextel is utilizing for its trial deployment of FLASH-OFDM in
    > the Research Triangle metro. Three possibilities seem to emerge: SMR
    > 800, MMDS, or PCS.

    PCS

    >
    >
    > Additionally, the Flarion documentation is somewhat vague as to
    > whether FLASH-OFDM deployment requires 1.25 MHz paired FDD
    > (frequency-division duplex) for a total spectrum outlay of 2.5 MHz or
    > 625 KHz paired FDD for a total of 1.25 MHz. Flarion ambiguously
    > states 1.25 MHz FDD, though I would suspect the former, that 1.25 MHz
    > "green field" spectrum is required for each of the forward &
    > reverse-links.
    >

    I spoke to Ray (Flarion's CEO) at CTIA He said they use 400KHZ carriers
    with a small "Guard Band"
    The FLASH-OFDM is a proprietary OFMD unlike Texas Instruments and does not
    conform to all of the industry standards

    >
    > As its name would suggest - Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing
    > - it is a frequency-division interface, but the precise tonal spacing
    > required for frequency-orthogonality eliminates as a possibility the
    > interleaved portions of Nextel's SMR 800 MHz spectrum - the same
    > spectrum intertwined w/ public safety channels that Nextel wishes to
    > return to the FCC in exchange for a nationwide 10 MHz PCS license.

    Not exactly true Nextel does have some contiguous blocks of spectrum.
    I asked Ray if they could "Break Out" a 400 Khz carrier
    for use he said " Yes, but not in its current config"

    >
    > However, assuming that disregard of the established 25 KHz
    > channelization would be permitted under SMR regulations, the
    > contiguous 5 MHz paired of the SMR 800 A-C licenses or the 3.75 MHz
    > paired of the D-FF licenses - all of which are typically held by
    > Nextel - could be utilized for FLASH-OFDM deployment, albeit at the
    > great expense of iDEN capacity, which makes SMR spectrum utilization
    > unlikely.
    >
    > http://wireless.fcc.gov/auctions/data/bandplans/800smrband.pdf

    If you have contiguous blocks of 25Khz channel you can use them.
    I.E. WiDEN which uses multiple 25 Khz channels.

    >
    >
    > As Craig has astutely pointed out, Nextel has acquired a sizeable
    > holding of MMDS (Multichannel Multipoint Distribution System)
    > spectrum, largely through the bankruptcy purchase of WorldCom's MMDS
    > assets. The MMDS spectrum in the 2.6 GHz band was not originally
    > designed for two-way transmission. It is not paired FDD. But two-way
    > data communication has been approved by the FCC. And the 6 MHz
    > channelization (designed for 6 MHz NTSC analog TV channels) is large
    > enough that FLASH-OFDM FDD operation could possibly be contained w/in
    > a channel or certainly w/in separate channels w/in the MMDS band.
    >
    > http://wireless.fcc.gov/auctions/data/bandplans/mdsband.pdf

    Yep, Yep, that is Nextel's back up plan to the "SCAM PLAN".

    >
    >
    > Finally, others have reported that Nextel is leasing PCS spectrum for
    > the FLASH-OFDM trial in Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill. The PCS A & PCS B
    > licenses in MTA006 are AT&TWS & Cingular, respectively, neither of
    > which would be likely to lease any of their spectrum to competitor
    > Nextel. The same could be said of Sprint PCS, the PCS D licensee in
    > BTA368. That leaves the BTA368 PCS C, PCS E, & PCS F licensees:
    > Urban Comm - North Carolina, ALLTEL, & Comscape Telecommunications of
    > Raleigh-Durham, respectively.
    >
    > http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/license.jsp?licKey=9049
    > http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/license.jsp?licKey=9723
    > http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/license.jsp?licKey=10068

    It's Comscape

    Likely? The way Timmy throws around nextel's cash these carriers will
    lease their 1st Born.
    Look at Nextel's SEC filing. Do a little math and you will see COMSCAPE is
    getting big bucks.

    >
    >
    > ALLTEL as well is certainly a competitor to Nextel, but ALLTEL
    > controls the Cellular B-side license in the Raleigh-Durham CMA, hence
    > its PCS spectrum in that market could be expendable. The more likely
    > contender, though, would be either of the two entrepreneurial
    > companies, about which little information seems to be available.

    There is plenty of info around .

    ComScape Telecommunications, Inc./Kiwi PCS is headquartered in West Palm
    Beach, Florida and is
    constructing a CDMA2000 1X wireless system in North Carolina with
    expansion into Ohio, West Virginia and
    Kentucky. They now offer their Kiwi Free service in Wilmington, North
    Carolina. ComScape is privately-held
    and has virtually no debt. They are a facilities-based, fully integrated,
    telecommunications services company
    with switching centers in Raleigh, North Carolina and Charleston, West
    Virginia. In addition, they have a call
    center in West Palm Beach, Florida.

    >
    >
    > Andrew
    > --
    > Andrew Shepherd
    > cinema@ku.edu
    > cinema@sprintpcs.com
    > http://www.ku.edu/home/cinema/

    --
    "NEXTEL-1 IT'S NOT JUST NEXTEL"
    Note The New address
    Subscribe to Nextel-1: http://www.groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/NEXTEL-1

    "NEXTEL2 FOR iDEN SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS"
    Subscribe to Nextel2: http://www.groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/NEXTEL2

    "WIRELESS FORUM HOMELAND SECURITY GROUP"
    The Complete Resource for Wireless Homeland Security.
    Subscribe to WFHSG: http://www.groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/WFHSG
  10. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    Flarion Is On FIRE~~~~~~

    Timmy said publicly a few months ago at one of the Nextel Dog & Pony Shows
    for Investors that Nextel was "renting" some
    spectrum for the Flarion deployment in N.C. He would not say "Who" was
    renting Nextel the spectrum, however a little
    research tells the whole story............


    Nextel Leases Spectrum From -COMSCAPE TELECOM OF RALEIGH-DURHAM For
    Flarion Network

    License-

    ULS License- PCS Broadband License - KNLG699 - COMSCAPE TELECOMMUNICATIONS
    OF
    RALEIGH-DURHAM LICENSE, INC.
    BTA368 - Raleigh-Durham, NC
    Channel Block
    F
    Submarket
    0
    Associated
    Frequencies

    1890.00000-1895.00000 MHZ
    1970.00000-1975.00000 MHZ


    http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/license.jsp?licKey=10068


    Who is ComScape ???

    As of 2003-
    ComScape Telecommunications, Inc./Kiwi PCS is headquartered in West Palm
    Beach, Florida and is constructing a
    CDMA2000 1X wireless system in North Carolina with expansion into Ohio,
    West Virginia and Kentucky. They now offer
    their Kiwi Free service in Wilmington, North Carolina. ComScape is
    privately-held and has virtually no debt. They are a
    facilities-based, fully integrated, telecommunications services company
    with switching centers in Raleigh, North Carolina and
    Charleston, West Virginia. In addition, they have a call center in West
    Palm Beach, Florida.


    Bhogin M. Modi ComScape Telecommunications, Inc.
    ComScape Telecommunications, Inc. – Kiwi PCS Kiwi PCS
    Telephone: 561-540-4771; E-mail: bhogin.modi@kiwipcs.com
    1926 10th Avenue North, Suite 305
    West Palm Beach, Florida 33461


    ===============================================================================

    Nextel / Flarion Equipment-

    Flarion Base Stations

    1971.25 -1973.75 MHZ

    1972.55-1976.2 MHZ


    *************************************************

    Flarion PC Card

    1890.75 -1894.25 MHZ

    Flarion Fixed Subscriber Unit (Home PC)

    1890.75 -1894.25 MHZ


    https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet/cf/eas/reports/GenericSearchResult.cfm?RequestTimeout=500

    Timmy the mystery is DONE!
    --
    "NEXTEL-1 IT'S NOT JUST NEXTEL"
    Note The New address
    Subscribe to Nextel-1: http://www.groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/NEXTEL-1

    "NEXTEL2 FOR iDEN SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS"
    Subscribe to Nextel2: http://www.groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/NEXTEL2

    "WIRELESS FORUM HOMELAND SECURITY GROUP"
    The Complete Resource for Wireless Homeland Security.
    Subscribe to WFHSG: http://www.groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/WFHSG

    **************************************************************************************************

    Andrew Shepherd wrote:

    > Try as I may, I cannot uncover a definitive answer as to which
    > spectrum Nextel is utilizing for its trial deployment of FLASH-OFDM in
    > the Research Triangle metro. Three possibilities seem to emerge: SMR
    > 800, MMDS, or PCS.
    >
    > Additionally, the Flarion documentation is somewhat vague as to
    > whether FLASH-OFDM deployment requires 1.25 MHz paired FDD
    > (frequency-division duplex) for a total spectrum outlay of 2.5 MHz or
    > 625 KHz paired FDD for a total of 1.25 MHz. Flarion ambiguously
    > states 1.25 MHz FDD, though I would suspect the former, that 1.25 MHz
    > "green field" spectrum is required for each of the forward &
    > reverse-links.
    >
    > As its name would suggest - Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing
    > - it is a frequency-division interface, but the precise tonal spacing
    > required for frequency-orthogonality eliminates as a possibility the
    > interleaved portions of Nextel's SMR 800 MHz spectrum - the same
    > spectrum intertwined w/ public safety channels that Nextel wishes to
    > return to the FCC in exchange for a nationwide 10 MHz PCS license.
    > However, assuming that disregard of the established 25 KHz
    > channelization would be permitted under SMR regulations, the
    > contiguous 5 MHz paired of the SMR 800 A-C licenses or the 3.75 MHz
    > paired of the D-FF licenses - all of which are typically held by
    > Nextel - could be utilized for FLASH-OFDM deployment, albeit at the
    > great expense of iDEN capacity, which makes SMR spectrum utilization
    > unlikely.
    >
    > http://wireless.fcc.gov/auctions/data/bandplans/800smrband.pdf
    >
    > As Craig has astutely pointed out, Nextel has acquired a sizeable
    > holding of MMDS (Multichannel Multipoint Distribution System)
    > spectrum, largely through the bankruptcy purchase of WorldCom's MMDS
    > assets. The MMDS spectrum in the 2.6 GHz band was not originally
    > designed for two-way transmission. It is not paired FDD. But two-way
    > data communication has been approved by the FCC. And the 6 MHz
    > channelization (designed for 6 MHz NTSC analog TV channels) is large
    > enough that FLASH-OFDM FDD operation could possibly be contained w/in
    > a channel or certainly w/in separate channels w/in the MMDS band.
    >
    > http://wireless.fcc.gov/auctions/data/bandplans/mdsband.pdf
    >
    > Finally, others have reported that Nextel is leasing PCS spectrum for
    > the FLASH-OFDM trial in Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill. The PCS A & PCS B
    > licenses in MTA006 are AT&TWS & Cingular, respectively, neither of
    > which would be likely to lease any of their spectrum to competitor
    > Nextel. The same could be said of Sprint PCS, the PCS D licensee in
    > BTA368. That leaves the BTA368 PCS C, PCS E, & PCS F licensees:
    > Urban Comm - North Carolina, ALLTEL, & Comscape Telecommunications of
    > Raleigh-Durham, respectively.
    >
    > http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/license.jsp?licKey=9049
    > http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/license.jsp?licKey=9723
    > http://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/UlsSearch/license.jsp?licKey=10068
    >
    > ALLTEL as well is certainly a competitor to Nextel, but ALLTEL
    > controls the Cellular B-side license in the Raleigh-Durham CMA, hence
    > its PCS spectrum in that market could be expendable. The more likely
    > contender, though, would be either of the two entrepreneurial
    > companies, about which little information seems to be available.
    >
    > Andrew
    > --
    > Andrew Shepherd
    > cinema@ku.edu
    > cinema@sprintpcs.com
    > http://www.ku.edu/home/cinema/

    --
    "NEXTEL-1 IT'S NOT JUST NEXTEL"
    Note The New address
    Subscribe to Nextel-1: http://www.groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/NEXTEL-1

    "NEXTEL2 FOR iDEN SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS"
    Subscribe to Nextel2: http://www.groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/NEXTEL2

    "WIRELESS FORUM HOMELAND SECURITY GROUP"
    The Complete Resource for Wireless Homeland Security.
    Subscribe to WFHSG: http://www.groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/WFHSG
  11. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.nextel,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.tech (More info?)

    Special Report.


    http://www.onlinejournal.com/Special_Reports/052104Madsen/052104madsen.html


    Karl Rove's White House " Murder, Inc."

    By Wayne Madsen
    Online Journal Contributing Writer


    JUNE , 2004- On September 15, 2001, just four days after the 9-11 attacks,
    CIA Director George Tenet provided President [sic] Bush with a Top Secret
    "Worldwide Attack Matrix"-a virtual license to kill targets deemed to be a
    threat to the United States in some 80 countries around the world. The Tenet
    plan, which was subsequently approved by Bush, essentially reversed the
    executive orders of four previous U.S. administrations that expressly
    prohibited political assassinations.

    According to high level European intelligence officials, Bush's counselor,
    Karl Rove, used the new presidential authority to silence a popular Lebanese
    Christian politician who was planning to offer irrefutable evidence that
    Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon authorized the massacre of hundreds of
    Palestinian men, women, and children in the Beirut refugee camps of Sabra
    and Shatilla in 1982. In addition, Sharon provided the Lebanese forces who
    carried out the grisly task. At the time of the massacres, Elie Hobeika was
    intelligence chief of Lebanese Christian forces in Lebanon who were battling
    Palestinians and other Muslim groups in a bloody civil war. He was also the
    chief liaison to Israeli Defense Force (IDF) personnel in Lebanon. An
    official Israeli inquiry into the massacre at the camps, the Kahan
    Commission, merely found Sharon "indirectly" responsible for the slaughter
    and fingered Hobeika as the chief instigator.

    The Kahan Commission never called on Hobeika to offer testimony in his
    defense. However, in response to charges brought against Sharon before a
    special war crimes court in Belgium, Hobeika was urged to testify against
    Sharon, according to well-informed Lebanese sources. Hobeika was prepared to
    offer a different version of events than what was contained in the Kahan
    report. A 1993 Belgian law permitting human rights prosecutions was unusual
    in that non-Belgians could be tried for violations against other
    non-Belgians in a Belgian court. Under pressure from the Bush
    administration, the law was severely amended and the extra territoriality
    provisions were curtailed.

    Hobeika headed the Lebanese forces intelligence agency since the mid- 1970s
    and he soon developed close ties to the CIA. He was a frequent visitor to
    the CIA's headquarters at Langley, Virginia. After the Syrian invasion of
    Lebanon in 1990, Hobeika held a number of cabinet positions in the Lebanese
    government, a proxy for the Syrian occupation authorities. He also served in
    the parliament. In July 2001, Hobeika called a press conference and
    announced he was prepared to testify against Sharon in Belgium and revealed
    that he had evidence of what actually occurred in Sabra and Shatilla.
    Hobeika also indicated that Israel had flown members of the South Lebanon
    Army (SLA) into Beirut International Airport in an Israeli Air Force C130
    transport plane. In full view of dozens of witnesses, including members of
    the Lebanese army and others, SLA troops under the command of Major Saad
    Haddad were slipped into the camps to commit the massacres. The SLA troops
    were under the direct command of Ariel Sharon and an Israeli Mossad agent
    provocateur named Rafi Eitan. Hobeika offered evidence that a former U.S.
    ambassador to Lebanon was aware of the Israeli plot. In addition, the IDF
    had placed a camera in a strategic position to film the Sabra and Shatilla
    massacres. Hobeika was going to ask that the footage be released as part of
    the investigation of Sharon.

    After announcing he was willing to testify against Sharon, Hobeika became
    fearful for his safety and began moves to leave Lebanon. Hobeika was not
    aware that his threats to testify against Sharon had triggered a series of
    fateful events that reached well into the White House and Sharon's office.

    On January 24, 2002, Hobeika's car was blown up by a remote controlled bomb
    placed in a parked Mercedes along a street in the Hazmieh section of Beirut.
    The bomb exploded when Hobeika and his three associates, Fares Souweidan,
    Mitri Ajram, and Waleed Zein, were driving their Range Rover past the
    TNT-laden Mercedes at 9:40 am Beirut time. The Range Rover's four passengers
    were killed in the explosion. In case Hobeika's car had taken another route
    through the neighborhood, two additional parked cars, located at two other
    choke points, were also rigged with TNT. The powerful bomb wounded a number
    of other people on the street. Other parked cars were destroyed and
    buildings and homes were damaged. The Lebanese president, prime minister,
    and interior minister all claimed that Israeli agents were behind the
    attack.

    It is noteworthy that the State Department's list of global terrorist
    incidents for 2002 worldwide failed to list the car bombing attack on
    Hobeika and his party. The White House wanted to ensure the attack was
    censored from the report. The reason was simple: the attack ultimately had
    Washington's fingerprints on it.

    High level European intelligence sources now report that Karl Rove
    personally coordinated Hobeika's assassination. The hit on Hobeika employed
    Syrian intelligence agents. Syrian President Bashar Assad was trying to
    curry favor with the Bush administration in the aftermath of 9-11 and was
    more than willing to help the White House. In addition, Assad's father,
    Hafez Assad, had been an ally of Bush's father during Desert Storm, a period
    that saw Washington give a "wink and a nod" to Syria's occupation of
    Lebanon. Rove wanted to help Sharon avoid any political embarrassment from
    an in absentia trial in Brussels where Hobeika would be a star witness. Rove
    and Sharon agreed on the plan to use Syrian Military Intelligence agents to
    assassinate Hobeika. Rove saw Sharon as an indispensable ally of Bush in
    ensuring the loyalty of the Christian evangelical and Jewish voting blocs in
    the United States. Sharon saw the plan to have the United States coordinate
    the hit as a way to mask all connections to Jerusalem.

    The Syrian hit team was ordered by Assef Shawkat, the number two man in
    Syrian military intelligence and a good friend and brother in law of Syrian
    President Bashar Assad. Assad's intelligence services had already cooperated
    with U.S. intelligence in resorting to unconventional methods to extract
    information from al Qaeda detainees deported to Syria from the United States
    and other countries in the wake of 9-11. The order to take out Hobeika was
    transmitted by Shawkat to Roustom Ghazali, the head of Syrian military
    intelligence in Beirut. Ghazali arranged for the three remote controlled
    cars to be parked along Hobeika's route in Hazmieh; only few hundred yards
    from the Barracks of Syrian Special Forces which are stationed in the area
    near the Presidential palace , the ministry of Defense and various
    Government and officers quarters . This particular area is covered 24/7 by a
    very sophisticated USA multi-agency surveillance system to monitor Syrian
    and Lebanese security activities and is a " Choice " area to live in for its
    perceived high security .

    The plan to kill Hobeika had all the necessary caveats and built-in denial
    mechanisms. If the Syrians were discovered beforehand or afterwards, Karl
    Rove and his associates in the Pentagon's Office of Special Plans would be
    ensured plausible deniability.

    Hobeika's CIA intermediary in Beirut, a man only referred to as "Jason" by
    Hobeika, was a frequent companion of the Lebanese politician during official
    and off-duty hours. During Hobeika's election campaigns for his
    parliamentary seat, Jason was often in Hobeika's office offering support and
    advice. After Hobeika's assassination, Jason became despondent over the
    death of his colleague. Eventually, Jason disappeared abruptly from Lebanon
    and reportedly later emerged in Pakistan.

    Karl Rove's involvement in the assassination of Hobeika may not have been
    the last "hit" he ordered to help out Sharon. In March 2002, a few months
    after Hobeika's assassination, another Lebanese Christian with knowledge of
    Sharon's involvement in the Sabra and Shatilla massacres was gunned down
    along with his wife in Sao Paulo, Brazil. A bullet fired at Michael Nassar's
    car flattened one of his tires. Nassar pulled into a gasoline station for
    repairs. A professional assassin, firing a gun with a silencer, shot Nassar
    and his wife in the head, killing them both instantly. The assailant fled
    and was never captured. Nassar was also involved with the Phalange militia
    at Sabra and Shatilla. Nassar was also reportedly willing to testify against
    Sharon in Belgium and, as a nephew of SLA Commander General Antoine Lahd,
    may have had important evidence to bolster Hobeika's charge that Sharon
    ordered SLA forces into the camps to wipe out the Palestinians.

    Based on what European intelligence claims is concrete intelligence on
    Rove's involvement in the assassination of Hobeika, the Bush administration
    can now add political assassination to its laundry list of other misdeeds,
    from lying about the reasons to go to war to the torture tactics in
    violation of the Geneva Conventions that have been employed by the Pentagon
    and "third country" nationals at prisons in Iraq and Guantanamo Bay.

    Wayne Madsen is a Washington, DC-based investigative journalist and
    columnist. He served in the National Security Agency (NSA) during the Reagan
    administration and wrote the introduction to Forbidden Truth. He is the
    co-author, with John Stanton, of "America's Nightmare: The Presidency of
    George Bush II." His forthcoming book is titled: "Jaded Tasks: Big Oil,
    Black Ops, and Brass Plates." Madsen can be reached at:
    WMadsen777@aol.com
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