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Providing Free WiFi from Home

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 7, 2004 4:16:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I live in a relatively small city and thought it'd be fun to see if
there were any wi-fi hotspots in town. I knew a couple of the local
college campuses provided free wireless but I doubted anywhere else
did. So imagine my surprise when I plugged in my card and found 3
networks from my apartment bedroom! I don't live near any businesses
so I'm guessing these are coming from the other apartments around me.
I set up my own wireless access point by way of my cable internet
provider and told some of the people in my building to feel free to
log onto it. I'm completely supportive of the free wireless nation
dream that seems to have died out due to commercialism, but I was
wondering if its legal to provide such a service and if many other
people have done the same. I called up my ISP and asked them about the
number of computers I could have hooked to my network and he said 4 or
5 at a time won't draw any suspicion at all. Thanks,
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 7, 2004 5:47:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

In article <f9480de7.0405071116.704f888d@posting.google.com>,
adymross@yahoo.com says...
> I live in a relatively small city and thought it'd be fun to see if
> there were any wi-fi hotspots in town. I knew a couple of the local
> college campuses provided free wireless but I doubted anywhere else
> did. So imagine my surprise when I plugged in my card and found 3
> networks from my apartment bedroom! I don't live near any businesses
> so I'm guessing these are coming from the other apartments around me.
> I set up my own wireless access point by way of my cable internet
> provider and told some of the people in my building to feel free to
> log onto it. I'm completely supportive of the free wireless nation
> dream that seems to have died out due to commercialism, but I was
> wondering if its legal to provide such a service and if many other
> people have done the same. I called up my ISP and asked them about the
> number of computers I could have hooked to my network and he said 4 or
> 5 at a time won't draw any suspicion at all. Thanks,
>
Don't just take the person you spoke with's word on the subject. Be sure
you re-read your ISP's terms of service agreement to see if you are
precluded from allowing your bandwidth to be used by others...
--

Ben E. Brady
http://www.clariondeveloper.com/wepgen
FREE! Effectively manage your Wi-Fi network.
Change your WEP keys often!

http://www.clariondeveloper.com/webcloak
FREE! Encrypt email addresses on your web site!
Keep spam bots from sending you spam!

http://www.firewallreporting.com
Personal firewall log analysis tools for
ZoneAlarm, BlackICE, WinRoute Pro and Windows XP
Take stock of your firewall settings and take action against intruders.

http://www.videoprofessorscam.com
Don't get stung by this scam!
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 7, 2004 6:25:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Adym Roxx wrote:
> I live in a relatively small city and thought it'd be fun to see if
> there were any wi-fi hotspots in town. I knew a couple of the local
> college campuses provided free wireless but I doubted anywhere else
> did. So imagine my surprise when I plugged in my card and found 3
> networks from my apartment bedroom! I don't live near any businesses
> so I'm guessing these are coming from the other apartments around me.
> I set up my own wireless access point by way of my cable internet
> provider and told some of the people in my building to feel free to
> log onto it. I'm completely supportive of the free wireless nation
> dream that seems to have died out due to commercialism, but I was
> wondering if its legal to provide such a service and if many other
> people have done the same. I called up my ISP and asked them about the
> number of computers I could have hooked to my network and he said 4 or
> 5 at a time won't draw any suspicion at all. Thanks,
Sharing your connection is certainly gracious of you, but you should be
aware of certain possible problems.

1) People sharing your Internet connection are also sharing your local
network connection. That is, if you have any shares available on your
conputer(s), you could be vulnerable someone accessing you computer,
seeing your data, even deleting data.

2) You have certain legal obligations and obligations based on your
contract with your ISP. For example, not to spam, probably not to run
servers, etc. Unless you make changes to your network to prevent users
from abusing the connection, you could be denied access by your ISP. If
someone using your connection, for example, distributes copyrighted
material, you could be charged by the RIAA, since the distribution
originated from your ISP assigned IP address.

I think sharing is an excellent choice. But you need to be careful.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 8, 2004 2:35:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Adym Roxx wrote:

> I'm completely supportive of the free wireless nation
> dream that seems to have died out due to commercialism, but I was
> wondering if its legal to provide such a service and if many other
> people have done the same. I called up my ISP and asked them about the
> number of computers I could have hooked to my network and he said 4 or
> 5 at a time won't draw any suspicion at all. Thanks,

My concern would be someone using it for illegal purposes. Also, there may
be something in your AUP, that prohibits sharing with neighbours.

--

Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
james.knott.
May 8, 2004 2:35:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Adym Roxx wrote:

> I live in a relatively small city and thought it'd be fun to see if
> there were any wi-fi hotspots in town. I knew a couple of the local
> college campuses provided free wireless but I doubted anywhere else
> did. So imagine my surprise when I plugged in my card and found 3
> networks from my apartment bedroom! I don't live near any businesses
> so I'm guessing these are coming from the other apartments around me.
> I set up my own wireless access point by way of my cable internet
> provider and told some of the people in my building to feel free to
> log onto it. I'm completely supportive of the free wireless nation
> dream that seems to have died out due to commercialism, but I was
> wondering if its legal to provide such a service and if many other
> people have done the same. I called up my ISP and asked them about the
> number of computers I could have hooked to my network and he said 4 or
> 5 at a time won't draw any suspicion at all. Thanks,

"Free wireless nation dream" is a good way to phrase it. No matter how
much you rationalize it, bandwidth costs money. Somebody somewhere is
paying for it, even if it isn't you.

If you support a nation of free wireless access, go ahead and install
the national infrastructure, hire the multitude of personnel to design,
install and maintain it, and feel free to tell the whole country that
bandwidth is "on the house". I know I'd appreciate it if I had a 1Gb
connection to the internet and you paid for it.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 8, 2004 11:14:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Rôgêr wrote:

> If you support a nation of free wireless access, go ahead and install
> the national infrastructure, hire the multitude of personnel to design,
> install and maintain it, and feel free to tell the whole country that
> bandwidth is "on the house". I know I'd appreciate it if I had a 1Gb
> connection to the internet and you paid for it.
>

I'd even buy him a beer or two, to show my appreciation. ;-)

--

Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
james.knott.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 9, 2004 12:43:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sat, 08 May 2004 19:14:11 GMT, James Knott <bit_bucket@rogers.com>
wrote:

>Rôgêr wrote:
>
>> If you support a nation of free wireless access, go ahead and install
>> the national infrastructure, hire the multitude of personnel to design,
>> install and maintain it, and feel free to tell the whole country that
>> bandwidth is "on the house". I know I'd appreciate it if I had a 1Gb
>> connection to the internet and you paid for it.
>>
Eventually, given enough time, YEARS, this will happen. Not too sure
about the 1Gb part though.
>
>I'd even buy him a beer or two, to show my appreciation. ;-)
Enough people do this and you could open your own bar!
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 9, 2004 12:53:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 09 May 2004 01:50:59 GMT, in alt.internet.wireless , "gary"
<pleasenospam@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

>I notice nobody has a nation of free telephone yet, and it's been well over
>a century. Cheap telephone, yes (some places), subsidized, yes (most
>places), but free?

Define "free". Name me something you think is free, other than perhaps air
or thought, and I suspect we can find how you're paying for it.

FWIW I get "free" telephone calls. I pay 15.99 line rental, and can call as
much as I like.

>I do think the no-charge model is the best way to exploit wifi, but that
>doesn't equate to free. It means hotspots that aren't specifically trying to
>make a profit off it. It means your coffe might cost a penny more,

exactly.

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html&gt;
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc...;


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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 9, 2004 12:55:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On 7 May 2004 12:16:42 -0700, in alt.internet.wireless , adymross@yahoo.com
(Adym Roxx) wrote:

>I set up my own wireless access point by way of my cable internet
>provider and told some of the people in my building to feel free to
>log onto it.

Check the following:
1) your AUP with your provider. Typically they restrict you to access "in
your own home" and/or "your own family".

2) your legal obligations in re commercial or illegal use of the line.
Imagine if someone set up a porn website using your connection, or started
sharing out their massive mp3 connection.

3) your own security. Imagine if someone deleted all your personal files or
obtained your bank details. You need to firewall yourself off from the
public part of your lan.
--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html&gt;
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc...;


----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
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---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 10, 2004 3:35:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> I do think the no-charge model is the best way to exploit wifi, but that
> doesn't equate to free. It means hotspots that aren't specifically trying to
> make a profit off it. It means your coffe might cost a penny more, and your
> access time might be limited. It means your tax dollar might pay for access
> points on lampposts in the park. This model is alive and well in many cities
> (Portland, Oregon and Austin, Texas come to mind).
>
I had no idea that any city was applying that model *gets ready to
move*. I completely support that. I think if you told the average
citizen who doesn't know the difference between a dial-up and dsl
connection that they could get free net access with a small increase,
they'd completely support it too. The city I live in is dominated by
AOL dial-up for the most part. A few $10/month ISP's have cropped up
lately and is helping level the playing field, but many have no qualms
with the price. I subscribe to a cable connection for $44/month as do
many of my friends. There isn't much we can do about it either, for
the most part its a monopoly. The little hacker inside of me - inside
of most computer geeks - squeals with delight at the thought of what
would happen when a free wi-fi mesh is set up, even if that meant a
drastic reduction in bandwidth and a tax increase. Thats freedom of
information and part of the Wi Fi Dream.

On a similar note, I'm not sure if anyone here has ever used Net
Stumbler before, but its a good way of checking the signal strength of
wireless networks. I loaded my laptop up with it and took it out for a
little drive last night with a friend. Our little midwestern city has
about 70,000 people but within a bit of a circular path from one end
of town to the other, we picked up on 67 networks. Only about a third
of those had secured their connection. I didn't try to access any of
the networks, but the ranges on them at least formed the beginning of
a mesh. Yeah, security would be a huge problem, but its nice to know
that there are people out there willing to trust this technology -
especially in my city, which I would consider pretty backwards in
terms of technology.

I still hold my offer to my neighbors in free access, blindly trusting
them not to host porn sites or illegal mp3's. I still firewall my
system and do nightly system scans just to be safe. From what I can
see of my network activity, no one has taken me up on the offer
anyway. My guess is in the human nature of people being wary of free
gifts. Especially when its wifi and comes from a network security
major. Either way, this dream is going to have a hell of a time being
carried out, but I'll still hope. Thanks for all the input!
May 10, 2004 3:36:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Mark McIntyre" <markmcintyre@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:imor901b6dstv4ne17l3da2qo4gok35d7r@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 09 May 2004 01:50:59 GMT, in alt.internet.wireless , "gary"
> <pleasenospam@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
>
> >I notice nobody has a nation of free telephone yet, and it's been well
over
> >a century. Cheap telephone, yes (some places), subsidized, yes (most
> >places), but free?
>
> Define "free". Name me something you think is free, other than perhaps air
> or thought, and I suspect we can find how you're paying for it.
>
> FWIW I get "free" telephone calls. I pay 15.99 line rental, and can call
as
> much as I like.

My point exactly. It costs money to create wealth, and there is no free
lunch. But lots of subsidized lunches, which ain't necessarily a bad thing.

>
> >I do think the no-charge model is the best way to exploit wifi, but that
> >doesn't equate to free. It means hotspots that aren't specifically trying
to
> >make a profit off it. It means your coffe might cost a penny more,
>
> exactly.
>
> --
> Mark McIntyre
> CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html&gt;
> CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc...;
>
>
> ----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet
News==----
> http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000
Newsgroups
> ---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption
=---
May 10, 2004 8:45:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I just want to be clear on what I meant by the no-cost wifi model in Austin
and Portland. I'm not talking about a mesh network based on piggyback access
to people's non-commercial home networks. There are people who advocate
this, but without agreement from the ISPs involved, it would clearly be
theft of service.

In Austin, there is a large and growing community of bookstores,
coffeeshops, bars, and other businesses (including one movie theater chain)
that provide free wifi access to the internet. The business owners pay for
commercial ISP service, and the ISPs fully understand that there is a wifi
net on the subscriber premises supporting anybody who walks in off the
street. There is also a city-sponsored program that will soon begin putting
access points in local parks. There is a large and growing group of people
who donate their time to install, configure, and maintain free hotspots, and
to advise the owners and help train the staff.

There's nothing wrong with the mesh idea per se, but to do it without clear
agreeement from the ISPs involved is at least unethical. It would certainly
result in increased traffic, and at some point you would either lose these
connections, or be forced to start paying for commercial backhaul.

"Adym Roxx" <adymross@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:f9480de7.0405092235.233e9c61@posting.google.com...
> > I do think the no-charge model is the best way to exploit wifi, but that
> > doesn't equate to free. It means hotspots that aren't specifically
trying to
> > make a profit off it. It means your coffe might cost a penny more, and
your
> > access time might be limited. It means your tax dollar might pay for
access
> > points on lampposts in the park. This model is alive and well in many
cities
> > (Portland, Oregon and Austin, Texas come to mind).
> >
> I had no idea that any city was applying that model *gets ready to
> move*. I completely support that. I think if you told the average
> citizen who doesn't know the difference between a dial-up and dsl
> connection that they could get free net access with a small increase,
> they'd completely support it too. The city I live in is dominated by
> AOL dial-up for the most part. A few $10/month ISP's have cropped up
> lately and is helping level the playing field, but many have no qualms
> with the price. I subscribe to a cable connection for $44/month as do
> many of my friends. There isn't much we can do about it either, for
> the most part its a monopoly. The little hacker inside of me - inside
> of most computer geeks - squeals with delight at the thought of what
> would happen when a free wi-fi mesh is set up, even if that meant a
> drastic reduction in bandwidth and a tax increase. Thats freedom of
> information and part of the Wi Fi Dream.
>
> On a similar note, I'm not sure if anyone here has ever used Net
> Stumbler before, but its a good way of checking the signal strength of
> wireless networks. I loaded my laptop up with it and took it out for a
> little drive last night with a friend. Our little midwestern city has
> about 70,000 people but within a bit of a circular path from one end
> of town to the other, we picked up on 67 networks. Only about a third
> of those had secured their connection. I didn't try to access any of
> the networks, but the ranges on them at least formed the beginning of
> a mesh. Yeah, security would be a huge problem, but its nice to know
> that there are people out there willing to trust this technology -
> especially in my city, which I would consider pretty backwards in
> terms of technology.
>
> I still hold my offer to my neighbors in free access, blindly trusting
> them not to host porn sites or illegal mp3's. I still firewall my
> system and do nightly system scans just to be safe. From what I can
> see of my network activity, no one has taken me up on the offer
> anyway. My guess is in the human nature of people being wary of free
> gifts. Especially when its wifi and comes from a network security
> major. Either way, this dream is going to have a hell of a time being
> carried out, but I'll still hope. Thanks for all the input!
!