backup utility for windows XP home edition

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

I want to install backup utliity but I do not have a windows XP home CDROM.
The retailer DELL did not supply it with the PC.
7 answers Last reply
More about backup utility windows home edition
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    Installing the Backup Program on the Home Version
    http://www.onecomputerguy.com/windowsxp_tips.htm#backup_home

    HOW TO: Use Backup to Back Up Files and Folders on Your Computer in Windows XP
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;308422&Product=winxp

    --
    Carey Frisch
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows XP - Shell/User
    Microsoft Newsgroups

    Get Windows XP Service Pack 2 with Advanced Security Technologies:
    http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/windowsxp/choose.mspx

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    "javed" wrote:

    | I want to install backup utliity but I do not have a windows XP home CDROM.
    | The retailer DELL did not supply it with the PC.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    In news:9A60C2EC-D99A-4DC3-B489-1ABD34827DF9@microsoft.com,
    javed <javed@discussions.microsoft.com> had this to say:

    My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

    > I want to install backup utliity but I do not have a windows XP home
    > CDROM. The retailer DELL did not supply it with the PC.

    That's the penalty for buying OEM as far as I know. It's up to them what
    they deliver so long as they provide a method of restoring the OS to it's
    original settings. A better idea, in my opinion, would be to invest in
    Acronis True Image or Image for Windows (which I've been playing with lately
    and it's not too bad) both of which are available in trial versions but not
    free. Both allow true backups and restoration beyond what you're probably
    expecting from the backup utility included with XP.

    Galen
    --

    "But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
    without them."

    Sherlock Holmes
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    "Galen" <galennews@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:uy%23AJcWjFHA.1464@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > In news:9A60C2EC-D99A-4DC3-B489-1ABD34827DF9@microsoft.com,
    > javed <javed@discussions.microsoft.com> had this to say:
    >
    > My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:
    >
    >> I want to install backup utliity but I do not have a windows XP home
    >> CDROM. The retailer DELL did not supply it with the PC.
    >
    > That's the penalty for buying OEM as far as I know. It's up to them what
    > they deliver so long as they provide a method of restoring the OS to it's
    > original settings. A better idea, in my opinion, would be to invest in
    > Acronis True Image or Image for Windows (which I've been playing with
    > lately and it's not too bad) both of which are available in trial versions
    > but not free. Both allow true backups and restoration beyond what you're
    > probably expecting from the backup utility included with XP.
    >
    > Galen

    At the risk of being accused of nitpicking True Image and the like do not
    backup but image, there is a significant difference. Backup programs are
    suitable for backing up selected files/folders whereas Imaging programs will
    only 'image' partitions or drives. Both are valuable tools and users who
    need to safeguard data on a daily basis will find a backup program essential
    whereas an Imaging program is simply in the 'useful' category. Afterall you
    can always restore the OS and Programs from the original disks albeit with
    some inconvenience. However once original data is gone it is forever lost.
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    > "Galen" <galennews@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:uy%23AJcWjFHA.1464@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> In news:9A60C2EC-D99A-4DC3-B489-1ABD34827DF9@microsoft.com,
    >> javed <javed@discussions.microsoft.com> had this to say:
    >>
    >> My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:
    >>
    >>> I want to install backup utliity but I do not have a windows XP home
    >>> CDROM. The retailer DELL did not supply it with the PC.
    >>
    >> That's the penalty for buying OEM as far as I know. It's up to them what
    >> they deliver so long as they provide a method of restoring the OS to it's
    >> original settings. A better idea, in my opinion, would be to invest in
    >> Acronis True Image or Image for Windows (which I've been playing with
    >> lately and it's not too bad) both of which are available in trial
    >> versions but not free. Both allow true backups and restoration beyond
    >> what you're probably expecting from the backup utility included with XP.
    >>
    >> Galen


    "Edward W. Thompson" <thomeduk1@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
    news:ejGy0sbjFHA.3704@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > At the risk of being accused of nitpicking True Image and the like do not
    > backup but image, there is a significant difference. Backup programs are
    > suitable for backing up selected files/folders whereas Imaging programs
    > will only 'image' partitions or drives. Both are valuable tools and users
    > who need to safeguard data on a daily basis will find a backup program
    > essential whereas an Imaging program is simply in the 'useful' category.
    > Afterall you can always restore the OS and Programs from the original
    > disks albeit with some inconvenience. However once original data is gone
    > it is forever lost.


    In my view, most PC users would be well-served to employ a disk imaging
    program such as Symantec's Norton Ghost or Acronis True Image as their
    routine, day-in day-out backup system. By & large the simplicity of using
    these programs to effectively and reasonably quickly "cloning" the contents
    of one's working HD to another HD is an enormous advantage over backup
    programs that simply backup one's created data.

    By using a disk imaging program, the user can easily, routinely, and in a
    relatively short period of time create a clone of his/her HD. The clone (on
    another internal or external disk) will contain the *entire* contents of the
    drive that is being cloned. This includes the operating system, registry
    settings, programs, user created data -- in short *everything* that's on the
    source disk will be on the destination disk. For all practical purposes, an
    exact duplicate of one's day-to-day working HD. What better backup system
    can one have? And assuming the created clone resides on an internal HD,
    another critical advantage is that the cloned drive is bootable and can be
    used for restoration purposes in a relatively short period of time. (I
    should mention that in the XP environment a USB/Firewire external HD is
    *not* bootable, however, if it is the recipient of the clone, the contents
    of the the EHD can be "re:cloned" back to the internal drive for restoration
    purposes. Again, a simple, relatively quick, and effective process).

    Using medium to high-powered processors and modern HDs, cloning speed will
    be in the neighborhood of 1.5 GB per minute. And bear in mind that when
    using a disk imaging program such as the ones mentioned, the cloning process
    proceeds for the most part without user intervention or even attendance. A
    few simple keyclicks at the beginning to identify the source & destination
    drives and the cloning process "does its thing" without the user even being
    present. What could be more simple or straightforward? There's absolutely no
    reason why a user cannot use this disk-to-disk cloning process on a daily
    basis or whatever frequency he or she desires.

    Edward admits that when using what I guess we can call "traditional" backup
    programs, i.e., programs that simply back up the user's created data files &
    folders, it's of course necessary to reinstall the operating system and
    programs from the original disks, and this is a cause of "some
    inconvenience". Some inconvenience, all right! Can you think of a more
    onerous task than reinstalling your XP OS, fishing out all your programs'
    installation CDs, resinstalling those programs, then manually re:configuring
    your preferred settings, etc., etc. It's certainly nothing I would look
    forward to and I daresay few users would. Contrast that with the disk
    cloning process we have been describing.

    I should like to add that all that I've said does not negate for one moment
    a user's option to back up this or that file or folder at any given time. Of
    course it may be desirable to do so in many instances. But for creating &
    maintaining a routine, day-in & day-out backup system, serious consideration
    should be given to using a disk imaging program as we have descibed.
    Anna
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    In news:ejGy0sbjFHA.3704@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
    Edward W. Thompson <thomeduk1@btopenworld.com> had this to say:

    My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

    > "Galen" <galennews@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:uy%23AJcWjFHA.1464@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> In news:9A60C2EC-D99A-4DC3-B489-1ABD34827DF9@microsoft.com,
    >> javed <javed@discussions.microsoft.com> had this to say:
    >>
    >> My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:
    >>
    >>> I want to install backup utliity but I do not have a windows XP home
    >>> CDROM. The retailer DELL did not supply it with the PC.
    >>
    >> That's the penalty for buying OEM as far as I know. It's up to them
    >> what they deliver so long as they provide a method of restoring the
    >> OS to it's original settings. A better idea, in my opinion, would be
    >> to invest in Acronis True Image or Image for Windows (which I've
    >> been playing with lately and it's not too bad) both of which are
    >> available in trial versions but not free. Both allow true backups
    >> and restoration beyond what you're probably expecting from the
    >> backup utility included with XP. Galen
    >
    > At the risk of being accused of nitpicking True Image and the like do
    > not backup but image, there is a significant difference. Backup
    > programs are suitable for backing up selected files/folders whereas
    > Imaging programs will only 'image' partitions or drives. Both are
    > valuable tools and users who need to safeguard data on a daily basis
    > will find a backup program essential whereas an Imaging program is
    > simply in the 'useful' category. Afterall you can always restore the
    > OS and Programs from the original disks albeit with some
    > inconvenience. However once original data is gone it is forever
    > lost.

    An Imaging application backs up ALL data enabling a complete restore without
    the need of re-installing anything. Incrimental backups/images if you wish
    are also an option as are scheduled backups so it could be automated and
    allowing a complete restore to the last imaging point without the need of
    even re-installing the OS or anything else. Given my choice I'd much rather
    completely restore the OS and all data (other than pagefile and hiberfile
    normally) than to have to re-install anything or activate anything or enter
    the keys for purchased applications again. You can stick with a simple
    backup application if you'd like but the efforts are the same and the
    results from imaging far more beneficial in my opinion. By the way, I
    welcome nitpicking. Thanks for sharing your insights and opinions.

    Galen
    --

    "But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
    without them."

    Sherlock Holmes
  6. Anonymous said:
    Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    I want to install backup utliity but I do not have a windows XP home CDROM.
    The retailer DELL did not supply it with the PC.



    **** FYI to all customers purchasing new computer systems:: as a previous DELL rep, i'll let you in on a little known secret: whenever you receive a new system (computer) from Dell (and most other OEMs), you MUST specifically ask them to send you the software dvds/cds/etc that come pre-loaded from the company. usually, as long as you are within your first 30 days of purchase, you can get the OEM to send these software discs at NO CHARGE. by purchasing the computer (which comes with pre-loaded software), you are also purchasing licensing from each piece of software, so the OEM is obligated to provide viable means of restoring said software (other than simply a recovery partition on your hard drive). however, after that initial 30 day period, most OEMs could care less whether you can reinstall your software or not. hah.
  7. windows XP home edition, you can download from microsoft or other internet forum.
    backup utility, there are many, such as ghost, aomei backupper, you can find a lot from google.
    good luck
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