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Adding Wireless Capability to Home Portal

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 13, 2004 6:08:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I'd like to add wireless capability (and a couple of laptops) to my 2wire
HomePortal 1000c (combo DSL modem and wired router). I'm told that I can do
this if I add a wireless router in bridging mode. Can any router like a
Linksys be used in that fashion?

Also, am I understanding the following correctly:

--The ethernet cable between my primary computer and the HomePortal will now
go between the computer and one of the ports of the wireless adapter
--A new ethernet cable will go between the LAN port of the wirless adapter
into the HomePortal

Thanks,
Michael
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 13, 2004 6:23:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Unless you want to replace some existing equipment, what you really want is
a Wireless Access Point. You already have a router, so you don't need
another one.

You don't need to rewire your computers. Just connect the access point to a
client jack on the 2wire router.

Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.

"MNP" <mnpress@mindspring.com> wrote in message
news:mMAoc.4071$zO3.175@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> I'd like to add wireless capability (and a couple of laptops) to my 2wire
> HomePortal 1000c (combo DSL modem and wired router). I'm told that I can
do
> this if I add a wireless router in bridging mode. Can any router like a
> Linksys be used in that fashion?
>
> Also, am I understanding the following correctly:
>
> --The ethernet cable between my primary computer and the HomePortal will
now
> go between the computer and one of the ports of the wireless adapter
> --A new ethernet cable will go between the LAN port of the wirless
adapter
> into the HomePortal
>
> Thanks,
> Michael
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 13, 2004 3:50:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Ron..thanks for your reply. The 2wire has only these jacks: 1. local
ethernet (which is connected to my primary computer) 2. USB (labeled PC) 3.
DSL phone connection 4. Phone line (a remote desktop is connected by
phoneline adapter) So.. "client jack"? Sorry for my inexperience.. and
thanks again.


"Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
news:f_Aoc.37569$CC4.15027218@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> Unless you want to replace some existing equipment, what you really want
is
> a Wireless Access Point. You already have a router, so you don't need
> another one.
>
> You don't need to rewire your computers. Just connect the access point to
a
> client jack on the 2wire router.
>
> Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
>
> "MNP" <mnpress@mindspring.com> wrote in message
> news:mMAoc.4071$zO3.175@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> > I'd like to add wireless capability (and a couple of laptops) to my
2wire
> > HomePortal 1000c (combo DSL modem and wired router). I'm told that I can
> do
> > this if I add a wireless router in bridging mode. Can any router like a
> > Linksys be used in that fashion?
> >
> > Also, am I understanding the following correctly:
> >
> > --The ethernet cable between my primary computer and the HomePortal will
> now
> > go between the computer and one of the ports of the wireless adapter
> > --A new ethernet cable will go between the LAN port of the wirless
> adapter
> > into the HomePortal
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Michael
> >
> >
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 14, 2004 2:00:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Michael,

It sounds like your router has only a single Ethernet port for a local (what
I called a client) computer. You can expand that capability with an
Ethernet switch (a 4-port switch should run around $40). Don't buy an
Ethernet hub; for this wireless application a hub wouldn't provide the
necessary level of security. Often an Ethernet switch is built into the
router, which is why I thought you would have additional client jacks
available.

The Ethernet switch will probably have one jack that is different than the
others. It is usually called the Uplink jack; the more formal name for it
is MDI. This jack is used to connect to your router. The other jacks
(formally called MDI-X) are for plugging in computers and your Access Point.

On some switches, two jacks have the same number (like 1 and 1x). In that
case you can only use one or the other. The x jack would be for a computer
or access point, the jack without the x would be for uplink. On other
switches one jack can serve either purpose, and your choice is made using a
button. On some new switches, you don't need to be concerned about these
things at all, since the switch automatically detects whether you need an
uplink jack or not. This should be clear when you see the manufacturer's
documentation, but if not just give me a holler.

DSL line ----- DSL jack--router--local Ethernet ----- uplink jack--Ethernet
Switch ----- Access Point )))

You can then plug in computers to the Ethernet switch, as well as one
computer plugged into the USB jack on the router.

Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.

"MNP" <mnpress@mindspring.com> wrote in message
news:CiJoc.7994$KE6.1097@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> Ron..thanks for your reply. The 2wire has only these jacks: 1. local
> ethernet (which is connected to my primary computer) 2. USB (labeled PC)
3.
> DSL phone connection 4. Phone line (a remote desktop is connected by
> phoneline adapter) So.. "client jack"? Sorry for my inexperience..
and
> thanks again.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 14, 2004 7:01:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Ron... thanks so much...I'll give it a whirl

Michael

"Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
news:RdSoc.47550$CC4.17977137@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> Michael,
>
> It sounds like your router has only a single Ethernet port for a local
(what
> I called a client) computer. You can expand that capability with an
> Ethernet switch (a 4-port switch should run around $40). Don't buy an
> Ethernet hub; for this wireless application a hub wouldn't provide the
> necessary level of security. Often an Ethernet switch is built into the
> router, which is why I thought you would have additional client jacks
> available.
>
> The Ethernet switch will probably have one jack that is different than the
> others. It is usually called the Uplink jack; the more formal name for it
> is MDI. This jack is used to connect to your router. The other jacks
> (formally called MDI-X) are for plugging in computers and your Access
Point.
>
> On some switches, two jacks have the same number (like 1 and 1x). In that
> case you can only use one or the other. The x jack would be for a
computer
> or access point, the jack without the x would be for uplink. On other
> switches one jack can serve either purpose, and your choice is made using
a
> button. On some new switches, you don't need to be concerned about these
> things at all, since the switch automatically detects whether you need an
> uplink jack or not. This should be clear when you see the manufacturer's
> documentation, but if not just give me a holler.
>
> DSL line ----- DSL jack--router--local Ethernet ----- uplink
jack--Ethernet
> Switch ----- Access Point )))
>
> You can then plug in computers to the Ethernet switch, as well as one
> computer plugged into the USB jack on the router.
>
> Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
>
> "MNP" <mnpress@mindspring.com> wrote in message
> news:CiJoc.7994$KE6.1097@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> > Ron..thanks for your reply. The 2wire has only these jacks: 1. local
> > ethernet (which is connected to my primary computer) 2. USB (labeled PC)
> 3.
> > DSL phone connection 4. Phone line (a remote desktop is connected by
> > phoneline adapter) So.. "client jack"? Sorry for my inexperience..
> and
> > thanks again.
>
>
!