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Windows 7 ReadyBoost

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September 12, 2009 6:50:46 AM

I've read about how Windows 7 is suppose to actually use readyboost. I have a spare 8GB Microcenter SD card. It's rated class 6. Would it help to use this on my computer? Should I go ahead and dedicate the entire 8GB? What will it help?

I have 2GB 800Mhz CL5 RAM, 6000+, Windows 7 RC Ultimate.

More about : windows readyboost

September 12, 2009 7:24:07 AM

Just go to the drive properties in "Computer".
There is readyboost option.
It will automatically detect whether the drive can be used for readyboost or not.

I don't think RB will give much of a boost.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 12, 2009 8:33:23 AM

Readyboost didnt do much for Vista... maybe Windows 7 will be better ?
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September 12, 2009 9:40:42 AM

You'd have to try it and see, in most cases it doesn't help much, and ideally you'd be better off getting more RAM
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September 12, 2009 12:46:35 PM

My experience with Ready boost on Vista was mixed, some things may be running faster but I would not notice them.

The one area of actual improvement I did notice was the start menu, it loaded much faster! But you would only notice this if you turn your menu delay down to 0ms. I think the default is like 200ms.

I have heard that ready boost was improved for 7 but I have not taken the time to try it out and get a feel for it.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 12, 2009 1:55:45 PM

Read this. I can confirm that Readyboost really does help. I'm running the RC on a laptop with 1 GB of RAM. Adding 4 GB of flash drive for Readyboost greatly improves response times when I right-click for context menus, helps when opening programs faster, etc.
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September 12, 2009 5:14:45 PM

I know that it probably won't help that much. I just have it lying around, so I figured I'd try it. The big question I have is how much I should dedicate to readyboost? I've read that the ideal RAM to readyboost ratio is 1:1 to 1:2.5. I was just wondering if it made sense to put all 8GB in for a ratio of 1:4. Can it hurt?

Also, what is a good way to test whether readyboost help my PC or not?
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September 12, 2009 5:44:39 PM

More than 3-4 GB memory is not used in most cases.
So you can opt to set it lower than 4 GB.Won't hurt the performance.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 12, 2009 7:02:02 PM

Dougx1317 said:
Also, what is a good way to test whether readyboost help my PC or not?

Turn off your computer. Time how long it takes to shut off. Turn on your computer. Time how long it takes to boot. Then open several programs, one after the other, and time how long they each take to start.
Plug in your flash drive (or memory card), and configure Windows to use it for Readyboost.
Now repeat the previous steps (off, on, open programs), recording the times it takes for all of these operations with Readyboost. Comparing the times should give you an idea of approximately how beneficial Readyboost is in your situation. There is also a value to how fast something "feels". So use your computer for awhile with Readyboost, and see if you notice anything generally. Like I said, I do, but I have half the RAM of your system. Even if Readyboost doesn't help much, it certainly won't hurt!
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January 27, 2013 12:53:55 PM

It wil help if you are running out of RAM. If you are not, then you will not see a difference.
This is true also if you are running Virtual Machines which consume RAM and Hold it until you shut down the VM.
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a c 395 $ Windows 7
January 27, 2013 1:00:11 PM

Post is 3 years old.
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