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Advice for brand new Dell?

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Anonymous
May 19, 2005 6:04:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I've been reading this newsgroup for a while and you all are certainly
a knowledgeable and helpful bunch. May I impose on you for some
advice? My new Dell just arrived today and I haven't unpacked it yet.
It's a Dimension 3000 with Win XP Pro. My current computer is a 4-5
year-old Dell with Win 98.

I have no problem connecting the cords and cables, but I'm new to XP
and thought some of you might have some advice for me regarding setting
it up. I can take my time because my current computer is functional.

Are there any steps I should take once the new computer is up and
running? Should I go immediately to Microsoft update and see if there
are any new updates for it? I do have SP2 according to the specs.

What about getting my current printer and external zip drive to work
with the new computer? I've heard that some old peripherals won't work
at all with WinXP. If I update the drivers and still the peripherals
don't work, should I assume that's a permanent situation and replace
them?

Is it worth it to buy a data-transfer program to enable me to move my
old files to the new computer? I do have CD-RW (whatever that means)
on the new machine but don't think that helps with getting stuff off
the old one.

Lastly, is there anything I absolutely *should *not *do as I start
tweaking and adjusting the new system?

Thank you for any and all suggestions and warnings you may have for me.
I'm sure I'll be back with more questions as they occur to me. XP
makes me nervous, for some reason.

Carly

More about : advice brand dell

Anonymous
May 19, 2005 11:33:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Hi friend :) 

i just got my new D3000 a day ago and it looks ok alto looking inside
it seems empty, ie no place to install new drives as the brackets
that hold them are missing, also for the floppy too, and no place to
install grafix cards (no slot) :S

ok, what not to do... which i did was take the 40g drive out and wack
a 200g in its place, before i did this i updated all the drivers and
Xp program from start/programs/dell.

all was going well untill i went to install the drivers from the disk,
only 3 out of 6 were found, ,, no display drivers and a couple other
(carnt remember)

so i went to the dell website to get the chipset ect but dell dont
have any chipset drivers for windows me but they have them for most
of the other systems,,

it looks like ME is a no no for the D3000 and i am gonna have to try
this "XP" :) 

i have been using ME for the last 3 year! :( 

one thing that really takes the cheese with dell computers is the fact
that they dont give you the mother drivers!!

with my SiS computer all is on one disk hoy it in and sorted all is
good,,, i am thinking of using my new Dell as a flower pot :D 


well i can still hoy the 40g back in and it will work ok....

Richy
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 4:21:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> Should I go immediately to Microsoft update and see if there
> are any new updates for it? I do have SP2 according to the specs.

Oh yes, please do. And repeat it once every one or two weeks. Having SP2
does not mean that the PC is secure. Have you installed a virus scanner
already? If not, please do.

> Is it worth it to buy a data-transfer program to enable me to move my
> old files to the new computer?

You could also temporarily connect the old harddrive to the IDE and
power connectors of your CDROM/DVD-ROM drive, boot up Windows and then
just copy all needed files with Explorer.

> XP makes me nervous, for some reason.

It is not as bad as some people say. ;-)

Olaf
Related resources
June 18, 2005 4:21:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Carly, what your feeling is pretty much typical with a new computer.

When you open the boxes, check to make certain you received everything on
the shipping invoice. If not call Dell Customer Service immediately. You
will not get a hassle and they will get the missing parts to you in a day or
two.

If all Ok, hook it up and turn it on. Windows XP is not too far off windows
98 (a few small differences- all good IMO) and you should pick up on it in a
just few minutes.

As far as getting the data off your old one, consider buying a 256 MB (or
larger) USB jump drive. Make certain the one you get has drivers for Win 98
(most will work w/o a driver but not always.) Simply plug the USB dongle
into the port, it will be recognized as a new drive and all you have to do
is drag-n-drop your files as if it was a hard drive. Stick it in the new
system and download. This is the falsest and easiest way if your old system
is not on a network or does not have a CD-R.

Nice thing about Dell is the system is already configured and you will be up
and running in minutes.
Go for it!

P.S. A nice glass of wine goes good with a new computer...

> I've been reading this newsgroup for a while and you all are certainly
> a knowledgeable and helpful bunch. May I impose on you for some
> advice? My new Dell just arrived today and I haven't unpacked it yet.
> It's a Dimension 3000 with Win XP Pro. My current computer is a 4-5
> year-old Dell with Win 98.
>
> I have no problem connecting the cords and cables, but I'm new to XP
> and thought some of you might have some advice for me regarding setting
> it up. I can take my time because my current computer is functional.
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 12:43:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Dennis wrote:

> Carly, what your feeling is pretty much typical with a new computer.
>
> When you open the boxes, check to make certain you received everything on
> the shipping invoice. If not call Dell Customer Service immediately. You
> will not get a hassle and they will get the missing parts to you in a day or
> two.
>
> If all Ok, hook it up and turn it on. Windows XP is not too far off windows
> 98 (a few small differences- all good IMO) and you should pick up on it in a
> just few minutes.
>
> As far as getting the data off your old one, consider buying a 256 MB (or
> larger) USB jump drive. Make certain the one you get has drivers for Win 98
> (most will work w/o a driver but not always.) Simply plug the USB dongle
> into the port, it will be recognized as a new drive and all you have to do
> is drag-n-drop your files as if it was a hard drive. Stick it in the new
> system and download. This is the falsest and easiest way if your old system
> is not on a network or does not have a CD-R.

Hm, "the falsest and easiest way" - interesting Freudian slip. :) 

An even easier way is to get a USB housing for the old HDD and hook it
up to the new computer.
July 1, 2005 2:44:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>> As far as getting the data off your old one, consider buying a 256 MB (or
>> larger) USB jump drive. Make certain the one you get has drivers for Win
>> 98

> An even easier way is to get a USB housing for the old HDD and hook it up
> to the new computer.

Taking the old computer apart, removing the hard drive, buying a USB case,
installing the old hard drive, and when all finished, replacing the old hard
drive back in the old computer (assuming one is going to sell or give it
away) is definitely NOT easier then using a USB Jump drive. (No way is it
easier.)

Assuming you can get a USB case for a desktop at $25 (inc. shipping) (no I'm
not going to consider a 2-1/2 inch drive, we are talking desktop size only),
and a 1GB jump drive for $60 (1/2 GB are now going for just a little more
than the USB case) I would still recommend the jump drive.

Using it is a no-brainier whereas building an external hard drive is not an
easy task for anyone not familiar with tearing apart a computer (most users
are not hardware savvy). A jump drive should be sufficient (after all, all
your pulling off is docs, address book, spreadsheets, music, pixs, stuff
like that.) Well within the reach of a 1GB jump, which can be used for many
years there after. The USB case is pretty much worthless after you are done
copying files. (Unless you use the old hard dive to do backups (not really
needed with the size of today's hard drives IMO.) Anyway, I don't believe I
can agree with your logic.
Anonymous
July 1, 2005 2:56:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Dennis" <nobody@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:QA_we.24795$Ff6.6216@trnddc09...
>>> As far as getting the data off your old one, consider buying a 256 MB
>>> (or larger) USB jump drive. Make certain the one you get has drivers for
>>> Win 98
>
>> An even easier way is to get a USB housing for the old HDD and hook it up
>> to the new computer.
>
> Taking the old computer apart, removing the hard drive, buying a USB case,
> installing the old hard drive, and when all finished, replacing the old
> hard drive back in the old computer (assuming one is going to sell or give
> it away) is definitely NOT easier then using a USB Jump drive. (No way is
> it easier.)
>
> Assuming you can get a USB case for a desktop at $25 (inc. shipping) (no
> I'm not going to consider a 2-1/2 inch drive, we are talking desktop size
> only), and a 1GB jump drive for $60 (1/2 GB are now going for just a
> little more than the USB case) I would still recommend the jump drive.
>
> Using it is a no-brainier whereas building an external hard drive is not
> an easy task for anyone not familiar with tearing apart a computer (most
> users are not hardware savvy). A jump drive should be sufficient (after
> all, all your pulling off is docs, address book, spreadsheets, music,
> pixs, stuff like that.) Well within the reach of a 1GB jump, which can be
> used for many years there after. The USB case is pretty much worthless
> after you are done copying files. (Unless you use the old hard dive to do
> backups (not really needed with the size of today's hard drives IMO.)
> Anyway, I don't believe I can agree with your logic.
>
>

I can't imagine using a 256MB jump drive for moving my data.

My current desktop has 250GB + 100GB + 60GB = 410GB of storage. Even
assuming that only 200GB is uses, I'd still have to use the jump drive 800
times!

Tom
Anonymous
July 1, 2005 2:57:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Dennis" <nobody@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:QA_we.24795$Ff6.6216@trnddc09...
>>> As far as getting the data off your old one, consider buying a 256 MB
>>> (or larger) USB jump drive. Make certain the one you get has drivers for
>>> Win 98
>
>> An even easier way is to get a USB housing for the old HDD and hook it up
>> to the new computer.
>
> Taking the old computer apart, removing the hard drive, buying a USB case,
> installing the old hard drive, and when all finished, replacing the old
> hard drive back in the old computer (assuming one is going to sell or give
> it away) is definitely NOT easier then using a USB Jump drive. (No way is
> it easier.)
>
> Assuming you can get a USB case for a desktop at $25 (inc. shipping) (no
> I'm not going to consider a 2-1/2 inch drive, we are talking desktop size
> only), and a 1GB jump drive for $60 (1/2 GB are now going for just a
> little more than the USB case) I would still recommend the jump drive.
>
> Using it is a no-brainier whereas building an external hard drive is not
> an easy task for anyone not familiar with tearing apart a computer (most
> users are not hardware savvy). A jump drive should be sufficient (after
> all, all your pulling off is docs, address book, spreadsheets, music,
> pixs, stuff like that.) Well within the reach of a 1GB jump, which can be
> used for many years there after. The USB case is pretty much worthless
> after you are done copying files. (Unless you use the old hard dive to do
> backups (not really needed with the size of today's hard drives IMO.)
> Anyway, I don't believe I can agree with your logic.
>
>


Oh, and I don't understand why using the old drive for backups is not a good
idea. Where else would you back it up?

Tom
July 2, 2005 12:02:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
news:QM_we.173435$IO.4919@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> I can't imagine using a 256MB jump drive for moving my data.

Why buy a 1/4GB when there are 1GB avaliable? Can you even buy a 1/4Gb jump
anymore?

> My current desktop has 250GB + 100GB + 60GB = 410GB of storage. Even
> assuming that only 200GB is uses, I'd still have to use the jump drive 800
> times!

Now come on now. You only have a fraction of that used for your docs,
spreadsheets, etc. The rest is mosty system files, program files (which is
better reloaded from scratch) and other misc stuff like *bin files and the
like (stuff you would never copy anyway; certainly not an average user
transfering files to a new computer.)

I'm certain if you actually examined your data, you would find you could
probably get everything you need to copy over to the new computer on a 1GB
jump drive. (Assuming you were going to reload your programs like most
people would.) How many gigs of actual data do you really have?

The original poster was looking for the easiest way to copy files to a new
computer. the key here is "easiest" not hardest. They could of course copy
them over to CD-R or DVD-R as well (if they have a drive on their current
computer and know how to use it - not everyone who has the burner has used
it.)

It's simply too much effort for the *average* user (probably 95%+ of the
population) to jump through all these hoops of tearing apart the old
computer, finding & buying a USB case and copying the data in this manner.

Buy a jump drive locally, plug it in and copy. Couldn't be easier.
Anonymous
July 2, 2005 12:02:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

410GB? quite the huge porn collection.

"Dennis" <nobody@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:Ejhxe.102$Fy4.19@trnddc04...
>
> "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
> news:QM_we.173435$IO.4919@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> > I can't imagine using a 256MB jump drive for moving my data.
>
> Why buy a 1/4GB when there are 1GB avaliable? Can you even buy a 1/4Gb
jump
> anymore?
>
> > My current desktop has 250GB + 100GB + 60GB = 410GB of storage. Even
> > assuming that only 200GB is uses, I'd still have to use the jump drive
800
> > times!
>
> Now come on now. You only have a fraction of that used for your docs,
> spreadsheets, etc. The rest is mosty system files, program files (which is
> better reloaded from scratch) and other misc stuff like *bin files and the
> like (stuff you would never copy anyway; certainly not an average user
> transfering files to a new computer.)
>
> I'm certain if you actually examined your data, you would find you could
> probably get everything you need to copy over to the new computer on a 1GB
> jump drive. (Assuming you were going to reload your programs like most
> people would.) How many gigs of actual data do you really have?
>
> The original poster was looking for the easiest way to copy files to a new
> computer. the key here is "easiest" not hardest. They could of course copy
> them over to CD-R or DVD-R as well (if they have a drive on their current
> computer and know how to use it - not everyone who has the burner has used
> it.)
>
> It's simply too much effort for the *average* user (probably 95%+ of the
> population) to jump through all these hoops of tearing apart the old
> computer, finding & buying a USB case and copying the data in this manner.
>
> Buy a jump drive locally, plug it in and copy. Couldn't be easier.
>
>
July 2, 2005 12:19:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
news:lN_we.134531$VH2.35098@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> Oh, and I don't understand why using the old drive for backups is not a
> good idea. Where else would you back it up?

Tom, of course you could use the old drive for back up. My point was that
once the old drive was pulled out for backup, the old computer was now
unusable. Most people would (probably) like to sell of give-away their old
computer and therefore would have to put the old hard drive back in. We have
actually done that many times in the past (no more however.)

With the advent of entry-level computers coming with DVD burners now, backup
of complete data sets to a 4.7GB DVD is by far the easiest way to back up
data. With DVD's are now going for about 50 cents apiece it's also
economical as well.

We (my company) just bought a new $500 computer from Sams (had to get a
instant replacement as one had failed and there was no time to troubleshoot
the old one) and it came with a 17 inch monitor, DVD/CD burner, 1/2 GB
memory and 120GB hard drive. Now you can't expect much for $500 but I was
impressed with it's features.

My company backs everything up on CD/R's and will probably move to DVD/R's
shortly in the future; now that the price has fallen to a reasonable level.

Advantage over a second hard disk is, we can go back years ago an pull up an
obsolete file, or a file before it was changed, etc. from a CD. A second
hard disk will only backup the current file (which may be enough for
personal needs but not for business where history could be an important
factor.) unless you constantly rename it.

For the 'average' user, backing up to a jump drive or CD/R is sufficient and
practical. (Of course there are exceptions to the rules, buy I'm talking of
the average user.)
Anonymous
July 2, 2005 1:54:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Dennis" <nobody@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:Ejhxe.102$Fy4.19@trnddc04...
>
> "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
> news:QM_we.173435$IO.4919@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>> I can't imagine using a 256MB jump drive for moving my data.
>
> Why buy a 1/4GB when there are 1GB avaliable? Can you even buy a 1/4Gb
> jump anymore?
>
>> My current desktop has 250GB + 100GB + 60GB = 410GB of storage. Even
>> assuming that only 200GB is uses, I'd still have to use the jump drive
>> 800 times!
>
> Now come on now. You only have a fraction of that used for your docs,
> spreadsheets, etc. The rest is mosty system files, program files (which is
> better reloaded from scratch) and other misc stuff like *bin files and the
> like (stuff you would never copy anyway; certainly not an average user
> transfering files to a new computer.)
>
> I'm certain if you actually examined your data, you would find you could
> probably get everything you need to copy over to the new computer on a 1GB
> jump drive. (Assuming you were going to reload your programs like most
> people would.) How many gigs of actual data do you really have?
>
> The original poster was looking for the easiest way to copy files to a new
> computer. the key here is "easiest" not hardest. They could of course copy
> them over to CD-R or DVD-R as well (if they have a drive on their current
> computer and know how to use it - not everyone who has the burner has used
> it.)
>
> It's simply too much effort for the *average* user (probably 95%+ of the
> population) to jump through all these hoops of tearing apart the old
> computer, finding & buying a USB case and copying the data in this manner.
>
> Buy a jump drive locally, plug it in and copy. Couldn't be easier.
>


The original post discussed the 256mb drive.

Less that 15GB is programs, etcs as you say. The rest is all DATA.

At 20MB per image (12.4 megapixels), I use a LOT of space.

Tom
Anonymous
July 2, 2005 1:55:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Yes another new name from my stalker.

Surprise, surprise.


"Larry Flint" <Big_Headlights@Big_Winnebagos.com> wrote in message
news:xYhxe.22427$B_3.22250@fe05.lga...
> 410GB? quite the huge porn collection.
Anonymous
July 2, 2005 1:36:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

now now little tommie. don't get your weenie in a tangle.
nothing wrong with looking at dirty pictures.
but 410GB is bit obsessive don't u think?

"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
news:yZixe.175265$IO.131638@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> Yes another new name from my stalker.
>
> Surprise, surprise.
>
>
> "Larry Flint" <Big_Headlights@Big_Winnebagos.com> wrote in message
> news:xYhxe.22427$B_3.22250@fe05.lga...
> > 410GB? quite the huge porn collection.
>
>
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 2:05:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Thu, 30 Jun 2005 22:44:00 GMT, "Dennis" <nobody@verizon.net> wrote:

>>> As far as getting the data off your old one, consider buying a 256 MB (or
>>> larger) USB jump drive. Make certain the one you get has drivers for Win
>>> 98
>
>> An even easier way is to get a USB housing for the old HDD and hook it up
>> to the new computer.
>
>Taking the old computer apart, removing the hard drive, buying a USB case,
>installing the old hard drive, and when all finished, replacing the old hard
>drive back in the old computer (assuming one is going to sell or give it
>away) is definitely NOT easier then using a USB Jump drive. (No way is it
>easier.)

Point taken, but there are guides available all over the net. Anyone
should be able to manage it. Possibly excepting you.

>Assuming you can get a USB case for a desktop at $25 (inc. shipping) (no I'm
>not going to consider a 2-1/2 inch drive, we are talking desktop size only),
>and a 1GB jump drive for $60 (1/2 GB are now going for just a little more
>than the USB case) I would still recommend the jump drive.

So you're paying more than twice as much and getting a smaller drive.
Boy really sharp thinking there.

>Using it is a no-brainier whereas building an external hard drive is not an
>easy task for anyone not familiar with tearing apart a computer (most users
>are not hardware savvy). A jump drive should be sufficient (after all, all
>your pulling off is docs, address book, spreadsheets, music, pixs, stuff
>like that.) Well within the reach of a 1GB jump, which can be used for many
>years there after. The USB case is pretty much worthless after you are done
>copying files. (Unless you use the old hard dive to do backups (not really
>needed with the size of today's hard drives IMO.)
>
By reusing the drive, he doesn't have to "pull" anything. He can
simply leave it there, and access it anytime he wants. You saying
backups are not needed? Haw Haw.

>Anyway, I don't believe I
>can agree with your logic.

I feel so bad!
--
Top 10 Conservative Idiots:
http://www.democraticunderground.com/top10/
!