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2U Rackmount Gaming Server

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  • Servers
  • Business Computing
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Last response: in Business Computing
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September 26, 2012 11:43:48 PM

Hello just to note that this was posted in the 'New Build' section of the forums, I didn't notice this Business Computing section and I'm sorry for that, so I'll post it here and let the thread in the New Build section fall off. Thank you.

Approximate Purchase Date: Month or two.

Budget Range: $1,500 - $2,000 (AUS)

System Usage: Will be used for a colocation dedicated gaming server.

Parts I have chosen -

Case - Supermicro 825TQ-700LPB Rackmount Server Chassis - 700W PSU - 2U

Motherboard - ASUS P8Z77-V Motherboard : LGA1155, Z77, 4xDDR3-1333, 2xPCI-Ex16 v2.0, 2xPCI-Ex16 v3.0, 2xSATA-III, 4xSATA-II, RAID, 1xGigLAN, 8Chl-HD, USB3.0, VGA, DVI, HDMI, ATX

CPU - Intel Core i5 2500K Quad Core CPU (3.30GHz - 3.70GHz Turbo, 850-1100MHz GPU) - LGA1155, 1333MHz, 5.0 GT/s DMI, 6MB Cache, 32nm, 95W

CPU FAN - Intel BXSTS200C - Thermal Solution - (Active Heat Sink with Removable Fan) - For LGA2011 Serverboards

RAM - G.Skill 8GB (2 x 4GB) PC3-14900 1866MHz DDR3 RAM - 8-9-8-24 - Ripjaws-X - X2

O/S HDD - Got stuck here, usually have RAID for data servers but this one will be purely for game renting, I was thinking a smaller SSD hard disk drive for the O/S?

SERVER HDD - and a Larger SSD hard disk drive for the game server files?

Additional Comments:
My limitations are the 2U case at it will be going into a 2U colocation rack.
The server will only be used for renting for dedicated gaming servers. TF2, BF3, Natural Selection 2: This will be the main game to be run from it, it's a bit of a beast at chewing servers up and currently stats showing that the i5 2500k is the best type of server for this game, and I don't need ECC.
I will be trying to overclock, but not sure how that will go yet, depending on location in rackmount, power usage, etc...
Hard drives I was either thinking the above I have written or just RAIDing some SATA 7200rpm HDDs, it doesn't need huge amounts of space, it will not be for holding data.

Thank you for taking the time to read my thread.
Any advice would be much appreciated.

Cheers.

More about : rackmount gaming server

September 27, 2012 12:04:50 AM

The i5 2500k is the best cpu for PLAYING the game. Not hosting lots of games...
I Would get a i7 ivy bridge, and upgrade to 16gb ram.

Don't bother overclocking. It's a very bad idea in a server.
September 27, 2012 12:08:06 AM

SSD should be fine for the boot drive.

You need to give us your requirements.
Uptime expectations, budget, load expectations (how many users) etc...
Related resources
September 27, 2012 12:13:45 AM

Ah thank you aaab for the prompt response.
I shall reassess the list posted above and check out the i7 CPU / Motherboard options.

Yeah I'm not 100% sure about the expectations, I was thinking of setting up a 1 month trial server (just rented) and try to get some figures from that.

Thank you once again for your help.

September 27, 2012 12:17:08 AM

Overclocking is fine for your game hosting, HOWEVER!
It will need to run 24/7 and be rock solid, so no overkill 4.5GHZ overclocking and the such.

Overclocking to something like 3.8Ghz is perfectly fine to do in this case, ensure it is 100% stable!
September 27, 2012 12:45:22 AM

you should definitely go with a workstation board and Xeon processor if you'll have more than 1 game with up to 64 players each

or will only 1 game server be up at any given time...?
September 27, 2012 12:50:45 AM

dingo07 said:
you should definitely go with a workstation board and Xeon processor if you'll have more than 1 game with up to 64 players each

or will only 1 game server be up at any given time...?


It depends, it will start out with 1 game server at a time to see how things go, and then it will go on from there.
I've also considered the Xeon path, I'm currently in the process of renting out a Xeon Dell rackmount machine to see how they will run on it.
September 27, 2012 12:56:44 AM

I think you have to overshoot just in case it takes off, so you have the horsepower to drive the load - unles you have more rack space to add another server? do they offer front and back rails? for example, if you got a standard depth 2u server case, you can fit 2 servers, one on the front rails and one on the back rails - 2 servers in 2U of space, back to back
September 27, 2012 1:03:52 AM

dingo07 said:
I think you have to overshoot just in case it takes off, so you have the horsepower to drive the load - unles you have more rack space to add another server? do they offer front and back rails? for example, if you got a standard depth 2u server case, you can fit 2 servers, one on the front rails and one on the back rails - 2 servers in 2U of space, back to back


Yeah exactly what I want to do, overshoot with the hardware because if the server runs like crap nobody will want to play on it / hire it for clan matches etc.
I don't think it fits 2 servers, I will ask though. I could always add another server if like you said it takes off :) 
Thank you once again for your input :) 
September 27, 2012 1:07:09 AM

with that said, I would now suggest a dual Xeon WS board, but I think that's out of your budget - unless you only get one proc for now, and in the future throw the second one in when it gets up to speed

I would also find out what the backbone of the network is - is it 10Gbe or just 1?
September 27, 2012 1:20:39 AM

dingo07 said:
with that said, I would now suggest a dual Xeon WS board, but I think that's out of your budget - unless you only get one proc for now, and in the future throw the second one in when it gets up to speed

I would also find out what the backbone of the network is - is it 10Gbe or just 1?


Lucky to get a 1GB here in Australia :)  That will be what I'll be aiming for.
September 27, 2012 2:02:26 AM

He's in Ozzie can't order from newegg.
September 27, 2012 2:04:56 AM

aaab said:
He's in Ozzie can't order from newegg.

he can source it from wherever, and have an idea of the price diff
September 27, 2012 2:04:58 AM

LordSoth27 said:
Hello just to note that this was posted in the 'New Build' section of the forums, I didn't notice this Business Computing section and I'm sorry for that, so I'll post it here and let the thread in the New Build section fall off. Thank you.

Approximate Purchase Date: Month or two.

Budget Range: $1,500 - $2,000 (AUS)

System Usage: Will be used for a colocation dedicated gaming server.

Parts I have chosen -

Case - Supermicro 825TQ-700LPB Rackmount Server Chassis - 700W PSU - 2U

Motherboard - ASUS P8Z77-V Motherboard : LGA1155, Z77, 4xDDR3-1333, 2xPCI-Ex16 v2.0, 2xPCI-Ex16 v3.0, 2xSATA-III, 4xSATA-II, RAID, 1xGigLAN, 8Chl-HD, USB3.0, VGA, DVI, HDMI, ATX

CPU - Intel Core i5 2500K Quad Core CPU (3.30GHz - 3.70GHz Turbo, 850-1100MHz GPU) - LGA1155, 1333MHz, 5.0 GT/s DMI, 6MB Cache, 32nm, 95W

CPU FAN - Intel BXSTS200C - Thermal Solution - (Active Heat Sink with Removable Fan) - For LGA2011 Serverboards

RAM - G.Skill 8GB (2 x 4GB) PC3-14900 1866MHz DDR3 RAM - 8-9-8-24 - Ripjaws-X - X2

O/S HDD - Got stuck here, usually have RAID for data servers but this one will be purely for game renting, I was thinking a smaller SSD hard disk drive for the O/S?

SERVER HDD - and a Larger SSD hard disk drive for the game server files?

Additional Comments:
My limitations are the 2U case at it will be going into a 2U colocation rack.
The server will only be used for renting for dedicated gaming servers. TF2, BF3, Natural Selection 2: This will be the main game to be run from it, it's a bit of a beast at chewing servers up and currently stats showing that the i5 2500k is the best type of server for this game, and I don't need ECC.
I will be trying to overclock, but not sure how that will go yet, depending on location in rackmount, power usage, etc...
Hard drives I was either thinking the above I have written or just RAIDing some SATA 7200rpm HDDs, it doesn't need huge amounts of space, it will not be for holding data.

Thank you for taking the time to read my thread.
Any advice would be much appreciated.

Cheers.


I would not recommend putting a consumer motherboard in a datacenter much less into a datacenter while in a server case. There's a lot that can and will go wrong with your current setup. Server components belong in server cases, that's what they're designed for.

Supermicro has a very strong lineup of server and workstation motherboards, I've been using them for years. Grab an LGA1155 workstation motherboard and put an Intel Xeon processor in it with ECC RDIMM memory. Xeon processors and ECC memory are not much more expensive than their similarly rated consumer counterparts. ECC is something that you do need in any datacenter. If you suffer a fault due to a failed DIMM you will not be on site to diagnose it, the datacenter staff will have to spend time doing it for you (on your dime). ECC will prevent the fault and tell you which DIMM has failed so that you can replace it when it is convenient.

You should also get a Supermicro management card to go with your motherboard. This requires a separate IP and Ethernet drop but it will provide you with the ability to perform everything remotely via KVM over IP including firmware changes, power cycles, and OS reinstalls without relying on the datacenter staff to do it for you.
September 27, 2012 2:19:17 AM

Hmm yes a lot to think about, it's great to get different opinions, thank you so much for the list of parts and everyones input for the server.
My plans for the immediate future are renting out a Intel Xeon E3-1270v2 3.4GHz / 16GB RAM for a trial of 1 month to test the usage (power, performance, etc..).

Yes I do agree the Supermicro server lineup is very handsome that will most definitely be a route to take for a ready to go rackmount server.

Thank you all once again for your help, I'll try keep you guys posted on how the rental server runs on with that info I'll get a better understanding on what route to take.
Cheers.
September 27, 2012 4:06:40 AM

Going with a Supermicro barebones may be a great way to begin on something like this. I'm not a huge server expert, but I've utilized Supermicro barebones before and have been very pleased with them especially for the cost. You can build your own system using a chassis, motherboard, etc. based on a single socket LGA1155, but honestly I'd recommend going with a pre-configured barebones that supports dual-socket LGA2011 with dual-redundant power supplies. Yes, this is possibly going to get expensive, but you can start with a single processor and if things pick up and you need to upgrade your capabilities you can do so with the exact same server base. Otherwise, you'd have to start over with a completely new server base.

For storage, since you aren't going to be needing to store a bunch of data, I'd recommend a RAID10 of SSDs. This is going to offer you fault tolerance and improved speed.

One nice thing about many of the Supermicro barebones that I've used at least is they include an onboard ethernet port dedicated for IPMI which might be very handy for you to gain remote access to the server for management.

You may also be able to find some really nice HP ProLiant 2U servers beginning around this range.
!