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nEW USER OF xp

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  • Microsoft
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows XP
August 4, 2005 1:01:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

hI UPGRADED FROM WIN200 TO XP, AND RECEIVED A NUMBER OF ERROR MESSAGES. I
was prompted to go to the sites listed below. As they did not appear to be
Microsoft sites I did not download. Can anyone tell me if these sites are
secure and can be used?
www.cleanthis pc.com
www.e-registryclean.com
www.updatepatch.com
www.fixwinreg.com
www.regcleaner32.com

Thanks, Dan

More about : user

Anonymous
August 4, 2005 4:20:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

You are wise to be skeptical. Stay away from these scams and any other
programs you are offered from an advertisement, pop-up or error message.

--
Ted Zieglar
"You can do it if you try."

"Dan" <Dan @discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:42D23912-43F0-4B8F-A274-DCCA750F24B0@microsoft.com...
> hI UPGRADED FROM WIN200 TO XP, AND RECEIVED A NUMBER OF ERROR MESSAGES. I
> was prompted to go to the sites listed below. As they did not appear to
be
> Microsoft sites I did not download. Can anyone tell me if these sites
are
> secure and can be used?
> www.cleanthis pc.com
> www.e-registryclean.com
> www.updatepatch.com
> www.fixwinreg.com
> www.regcleaner32.com
>
> Thanks, Dan
Anonymous
August 5, 2005 12:19:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

Dan wrote:
> hI UPGRADED FROM WIN200 TO XP, AND RECEIVED A NUMBER OF ERROR MESSAGES. I
> was prompted to go to the sites listed below. As they did not appear to be
> Microsoft sites I did not download. Can anyone tell me if these sites are
> secure and can be used?
> www.cleanthis pc.com
> www.e-registryclean.com
> www.updatepatch.com
> www.fixwinreg.com
> www.regcleaner32.com
>
> Thanks, Dan


*NOTHING* from any of those sites is safe or necessary to use. You are
the victim of multiple scams.

The so-called warnings are from several very unscrupulous
"businesses." They're trying to sell you patches that Microsoft
provides free-of-charge, and using a very intrusive means of
advertising. It's also demonstrating that your PC is very unsecured.

This type of spam has become quite common over the past couple of
years, and unintentionally serves as a valid security "alert." It
demonstrates that you haven't been taking sufficient precautions while
connected to the Internet. Your data probably hasn't been compromised
by these specific advertisements, but if you're open to this exploit,
you most definitely open to other threats, such as the Blaster,
Welchia, and Sasser Worms that still haunt the Internet. Install and
use a decent, properly configured firewall. (Merely disabling the
messenger service, as some people recommend, only hides the symptom,
and does little or nothing to truly secure your machine.) And
ignoring or just "putting up with" the security gap represented by
these messages is particularly foolish.

Messenger Service of Windows
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=KB;en-us;168893

Messenger Service Window That Contains an Internet Advertisement
Appears
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=330904

Stopping Advertisements with Messenger Service Titles
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/pro/using/howto/comm...

Blocking Ads, Parasites, and Hijackers with a Hosts File
http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/hosts.htm

Whichever firewall you decide upon, be sure to ensure UP ports 135,
137, and 138 and TCP ports 135, 139, and 445 are all blocked. You
may also disable Inbound NetBIOS over TCP/IP). You'll have
to follow the instructions from firewall's manufacturer for the
specific steps.

You can test your firewall at:

Symantec Security Check
http://security.symantec.com/ssc/vr_main.asp?langid=ie&...

Security Scan - Sygate Online Services
http://www.sygatetech.com/

Oh, and be especially wary of people who advise you to do nothing
more than disable the messenger service. Disabling the messenger
service, by itself, is a "head in the sand" approach to computer
security. The real problem is not the messenger service pop-ups;
they're actually providing a useful, if annoying, service by acting as
a security alert. The true problem is the unsecured computer, and
you've been advised to merely turn off the warnings. How is this
helpful?

There are several essential components to computer security: a
knowledgeable and pro-active user, a properly configured firewall,
reliable and up-to-date antivirus software, and the prompt repair (via
patches, hotfixes, or service packs) of any known vulnerabilities.

The weakest link in this "equation" is, of course, the computer
user. No software manufacturer can -- nor should they be expected
to -- protect the computer user from him/herself. All too many people
have bought into the various PC/software manufacturers marketing
claims of easy computing. They believe that their computer should be
no harder to use than a toaster oven; they have neither the
inclination or desire to learn how to safely use their computer. All
too few people keep their antivirus software current, install patches
in a timely manner, or stop to really think about that cutesy link
they're about to click.

Firewalls and anti-virus applications, which should always be used
and should always be running, are important components of "safe hex,"
but they cannot, and should not be expected to, protect the computer
user from him/herself. Ultimately, it is incumbent upon each and
every computer user to learn how to secure his/her own computer.


To learn more about practicing "safe hex," start with these links:

Protect Your PC
http://www.microsoft.com/security/protect/default.asp

Home Computer Security
http://www.cert.org/homeusers/HomeComputerSecurity/

List of Antivirus Software Vendors
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;49500

Home PC Firewall Guide
http://www.firewallguide.com/

Scumware.com
http://www.scumware.com/


--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
both at once. - RAH