Good Computer for Student

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write her
papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought into
the picture.

I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF I
am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move up
to the Dimension 4700?

THanks gang :).

Marilyn B.
18 answers Last reply
More about good computer student
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    probably the 4700 would be a better choice. I would avoid the Celeron chips
    and look for either a 533 or 800 MHz bus. Make sure you check
    www.slickdeals.net or www.techbargains.com for specials form Dell and don't
    be afraid to look at the refurbished ones.

    www.dell.com\outlet She can get the student version of Office if she does
    not already have a copy. I would spring for the 19" flat panel as Dell
    seems to have it for about $250.00 fairly often. I just purchased one as a
    second monitor and it works great for a basic monitor.

    Wayne

    "Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >
    > My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    > coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    > doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write her
    > papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    > with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    > using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    > probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    > you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought into
    > the picture.
    >
    > I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    > 3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    > far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF I
    > am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    > they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move up
    > to the Dimension 4700?
    >
    > THanks gang :).
    >
    > Marilyn B.
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I bought a Dell Inspiron 8200 about 2 years ago. The display was defective
    upon arrival (so much for quality control). Dell wanted me to pay to have it
    shipped back. I bought an IBM Thinkpad and have been pleased.
    "Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >
    > My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    > coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    > doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write her
    > papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    > with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    > using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    > probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    > you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought into
    > the picture.
    >
    > I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    > 3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    > far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF I
    > am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    > they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move up
    > to the Dimension 4700?
    >
    > THanks gang :).
    >
    > Marilyn B.
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I forgot to mention, the 8200 was a refurb.
    "Kevin Haas" <khaas22no@bellspouth.net> wrote in message
    news:cyEle.13790$eR.8415@fe05.lga...
    >I bought a Dell Inspiron 8200 about 2 years ago. The display was defective
    >upon arrival (so much for quality control). Dell wanted me to pay to have
    >it shipped back. I bought an IBM Thinkpad and have been pleased.
    > "Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    > news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >>
    >> My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    >> coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    >> doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write
    >> her
    >> papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    >> with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    >> using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    >> probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    >> you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought
    >> into
    >> the picture.
    >>
    >> I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    >> 3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    >> far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF
    >> I
    >> am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    >> they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move
    >> up
    >> to the Dimension 4700?
    >>
    >> THanks gang :).
    >>
    >> Marilyn B.
    >>
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Don't know how that happened as Dell ALWAYS ships the new part out with a
    UPS label to send the old one back. I have been dealing with Dell since
    before they changed their name have purchased well over 200 desktops laptops
    and servers. yes I have had a problem or 2 with different things but NEVER a
    problem getting a part replaced. I have a Dell Tech meeting me today to
    replace a defective laptop motherboard.

    The only REAL problem I ever had was kind of odd in that they shipped me the
    wrong refurbished server!
    I was having a problem and I called tech support they told me I was with
    Chicago Police dept. I said no I was not. We kind of went round and round
    for a while until they admitted they shipped me the wrong server. I did not
    really care as the new server was a 1.8 instead of a 2.0 processor but it
    had over 74GB if more hard drive space so I never pursued the issue.

    You can get the same warranty on a refurb unit as you do a new one. Onsite
    support etc..
    I have also never seen any signs of wear on a refurb unit.

    Many times if you look at the outlet store you will see 10 or 20 units with
    the same spec. When I have inquired I have been told they may have been used
    for a classroom or demo/lab.

    People do cancel order and dell does have a no questions asked return policy
    that runs for 7-30 days depending upon the product.

    You can also check the HP/Compaq refurb web site too. They also have some
    good deals. At work I am changing over to HP desktops and servers due to a
    contract change so in 6 months or so I will be able to write how I think
    they are but I am dealing with business class computers with HP. I have
    purchased the whole range of Dell PCs for either work or friends so I am
    familiar with their whole product line.

    Wayne
    "Kevin Haas" <khaas22no@bellspouth.net> wrote in message
    news:oCEle.13791$eR.8639@fe05.lga...
    >I forgot to mention, the 8200 was a refurb.
    > "Kevin Haas" <khaas22no@bellspouth.net> wrote in message
    > news:cyEle.13790$eR.8415@fe05.lga...
    >>I bought a Dell Inspiron 8200 about 2 years ago. The display was defective
    >>upon arrival (so much for quality control). Dell wanted me to pay to have
    >>it shipped back. I bought an IBM Thinkpad and have been pleased.
    >> "Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    >> news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >>>
    >>> My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    >>> coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    >>> doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write
    >>> her
    >>> papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    >>> with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    >>> using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    >>> probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    >>> you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought
    >>> into
    >>> the picture.
    >>>
    >>> I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    >>> 3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    >>> far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF
    >>> I
    >>> am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    >>> they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move
    >>> up
    >>> to the Dimension 4700?
    >>>
    >>> THanks gang :).
    >>>
    >>> Marilyn B.
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Do yourself and your daughter a favor and stay away from the
    refurbished ones. They are someone else's headache..

    Bob


    On Thu, 26 May 2005 19:04:06 -0600, "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote:

    >probably the 4700 would be a better choice. I would avoid the Celeron chips
    >and look for either a 533 or 800 MHz bus. Make sure you check
    >www.slickdeals.net or www.techbargains.com for specials form Dell and don't
    >be afraid to look at the refurbished ones.
    >
    >www.dell.com\outlet She can get the student version of Office if she does
    >not already have a copy. I would spring for the 19" flat panel as Dell
    >seems to have it for about $250.00 fairly often. I just purchased one as a
    >second monitor and it works great for a basic monitor.
    >
    >Wayne
    >
    >"Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    >news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >>
    >> My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    >> coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    >> doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write her
    >> papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    >> with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    >> using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    >> probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    >> you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought into
    >> the picture.
    >>
    >> I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    >> 3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    >> far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF I
    >> am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    >> they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move up
    >> to the Dimension 4700?
    >>
    >> THanks gang :).
    >>
    >> Marilyn B.
    >>
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Bob, I don't know why you tell people that. I buy refurbished, have no
    problems and they look just like new. Dimension 8200, Dimension 8300
    which I really love and Inspiron 8200, all refurbished and no problems.

    Joan

    Capt Bob wrote:
    > Do yourself and your daughter a favor and stay away from the
    > refurbished ones. They are someone else's headache..
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > On Thu, 26 May 2005 19:04:06 -0600, "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>probably the 4700 would be a better choice. I would avoid the Celeron chips
    >>and look for either a 533 or 800 MHz bus. Make sure you check
    >>www.slickdeals.net or www.techbargains.com for specials form Dell and don't
    >>be afraid to look at the refurbished ones.
    >>
    >>www.dell.com\outlet She can get the student version of Office if she does
    >>not already have a copy. I would spring for the 19" flat panel as Dell
    >>seems to have it for about $250.00 fairly often. I just purchased one as a
    >>second monitor and it works great for a basic monitor.
    >>
    >>Wayne
    >>
    >>"Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    >>news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >>
    >>>My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    >>>coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    >>>doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write her
    >>>papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    >>>with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    >>>using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    >>>probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    >>>you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought into
    >>>the picture.
    >>>
    >>>I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    >>>3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    >>>far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF I
    >>>am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    >>>they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move up
    >>>to the Dimension 4700?
    >>>
    >>>THanks gang :).
    >>>
    >>>Marilyn B.
    >>>
    >>
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Bob,

    You're full of SH**. What did Dell do to you in a prior life to be spewing
    these falsehoods?

    Dell's refurbs are outstanding.

    Tom
    "Capt Bob" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:cnrd9113vgpe86tr4uq8d131cb0dcin5df@4ax.com...
    > Do yourself and your daughter a favor and stay away from the
    > refurbished ones. They are someone else's headache..
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > On Thu, 26 May 2005 19:04:06 -0600, "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote:
    >
    >>probably the 4700 would be a better choice. I would avoid the Celeron
    >>chips
    >>and look for either a 533 or 800 MHz bus. Make sure you check
    >>www.slickdeals.net or www.techbargains.com for specials form Dell and
    >>don't
    >>be afraid to look at the refurbished ones.
    >>
    >>www.dell.com\outlet She can get the student version of Office if she does
    >>not already have a copy. I would spring for the 19" flat panel as Dell
    >>seems to have it for about $250.00 fairly often. I just purchased one as
    >>a
    >>second monitor and it works great for a basic monitor.
    >>
    >>Wayne
    >>
    >>"Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    >>news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >>>
    >>> My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    >>> coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    >>> doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write
    >>> her
    >>> papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    >>> with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    >>> using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    >>> probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    >>> you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought
    >>> into
    >>> the picture.
    >>>
    >>> I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    >>> 3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    >>> far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF
    >>> I
    >>> am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    >>> they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move
    >>> up
    >>> to the Dimension 4700?
    >>>
    >>> THanks gang :).
    >>>
    >>> Marilyn B.
    >>>
    >>
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I have had NO problems with any of the Dell "refurbs I have gotten.
    Almost like someone ordered it, then cancelled the order after it was built.
    Always been fresh and clean.

    Bernie

    "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
    news:66Ele.76143$IO.11566@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
    > Bob,
    >
    > You're full of SH**. What did Dell do to you in a prior life to be
    > spewing these falsehoods?
    >
    > Dell's refurbs are outstanding.
    >
    > Tom
    > "Capt Bob" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    > news:cnrd9113vgpe86tr4uq8d131cb0dcin5df@4ax.com...
    >> Do yourself and your daughter a favor and stay away from the
    >> refurbished ones. They are someone else's headache..
    >>
    >> Bob
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> On Thu, 26 May 2005 19:04:06 -0600, "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote:
    >>
    >>>probably the 4700 would be a better choice. I would avoid the Celeron
    >>>chips
    >>>and look for either a 533 or 800 MHz bus. Make sure you check
    >>>www.slickdeals.net or www.techbargains.com for specials form Dell and
    >>>don't
    >>>be afraid to look at the refurbished ones.
    >>>
    >>>www.dell.com\outlet She can get the student version of Office if she
    >>>does
    >>>not already have a copy. I would spring for the 19" flat panel as Dell
    >>>seems to have it for about $250.00 fairly often. I just purchased one as
    >>>a
    >>>second monitor and it works great for a basic monitor.
    >>>
    >>>Wayne
    >>>
    >>>"Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    >>>news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >>>>
    >>>> My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    >>>> coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    >>>> doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write
    >>>> her
    >>>> papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    >>>> with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would
    >>>> be
    >>>> using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    >>>> probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    >>>> you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought
    >>>> into
    >>>> the picture.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    >>>> 3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    >>>> far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also,
    >>>> IF I
    >>>> am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    >>>> they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move
    >>>> up
    >>>> to the Dimension 4700?
    >>>>
    >>>> THanks gang :).
    >>>>
    >>>> Marilyn B.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Regardless of what other people might say, I think that a Dimension 3000 would
    be just fine for the use as you describe it. (And I am ready for the flames in
    response) I would consider a minimum of 512MB, either bought initially with the
    system or increased afterward. The built-in Intel extreme graphics is surely
    not too spiffy for gamers, but it is more than adequate for most other workaday
    tasks except maybe heavy-duty photo editing, graphic design, watching DVD
    movies. The Dimension 3000 is limited to a single 5.25" drive bay for
    expansion, and an internal hard drive cannot be added to it. If you get a large
    enough hard drive (say 80GB minimum) and a combo CD-RW/DVD player, the limited
    expansion potential is not a major issue.

    I have resold older and slower Dell (and other brands of) P4 systems for student
    and home use similar to what you describe, and have never heard people complain.
    My oldest son has a refurb 800MHz Compaq small form factor DeskPro for his use
    at college. It runs Windows 2000, Office, Internet Explorer, instant messenger
    just fine. All the talk about speed of processors and graphics is largely hype
    generated by the computer industry itself. For basic computer work, not even a
    gigahertz CPU is needed.

    An LCD monitor is a great space saver when desktop space is limited... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 26 May 2005 21:52:47 -0300, "Marilyn E. Burford"
    <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote:

    >
    >My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    >coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    >doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write her
    >papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    >with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    >using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    >probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    >you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought into
    >the picture.
    >
    >I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    >3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    >far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF I
    >am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    >they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move up
    >to the Dimension 4700?
    >
    >THanks gang :).
    >
    > Marilyn B.
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    i agree. the dimension 3000 with 512mb of ram and any processor (celeron or
    otherwise) is perfectly capable of word processing and web surfing. hell,
    even the dimension 2400 is up to the job. be sure to get 512mb or ram, and
    note that a hard disk upgrade to 80gb is only about $20, and that in some
    configurations dell is only providing a 90 day warranty but for $19 you can
    upgrade to a full year warranty. i also recommend getting a cdrw
    (recordable) drive that is not only handy for making backups of your data
    but also good for making copies of program cds or music cds. but having
    said that, keep an eye on the sale promotions as the dimension 4700 is
    sometimes just $50 more and even when purchase with the similar quality
    integrated video as the 3000 the 4700 includes a video expansion slot for
    the future installation/upgrade to a high performance pci-e video card. the
    4700 also offers faster "dual channel" memory and "sata" hard disk drives...
    but any performance increase is essentially meaningless compared to the
    speed that even the fastest typist can type in a word processor...

    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:4297221a.5183462@nntp.charter.net...
    > Regardless of what other people might say, I think that a Dimension 3000
    > would
    > be just fine for the use as you describe it. (And I am ready for the
    > flames in
    > response) I would consider a minimum of 512MB, either bought initially
    > with the
    > system or increased afterward. The built-in Intel extreme graphics is
    > surely
    > not too spiffy for gamers, but it is more than adequate for most other
    > workaday
    > tasks except maybe heavy-duty photo editing, graphic design, watching DVD
    > movies. The Dimension 3000 is limited to a single 5.25" drive bay for
    > expansion, and an internal hard drive cannot be added to it. If you get a
    > large
    > enough hard drive (say 80GB minimum) and a combo CD-RW/DVD player, the
    > limited
    > expansion potential is not a major issue.
    >
    > I have resold older and slower Dell (and other brands of) P4 systems for
    > student
    > and home use similar to what you describe, and have never heard people
    > complain.
    > My oldest son has a refurb 800MHz Compaq small form factor DeskPro for his
    > use
    > at college. It runs Windows 2000, Office, Internet Explorer, instant
    > messenger
    > just fine. All the talk about speed of processors and graphics is largely
    > hype
    > generated by the computer industry itself. For basic computer work, not
    > even a
    > gigahertz CPU is needed.
    >
    > An LCD monitor is a great space saver when desktop space is limited... Ben
    > Myers
    >
    > On Thu, 26 May 2005 21:52:47 -0300, "Marilyn E. Burford"
    > <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    >>coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    >>doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write her
    >>papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    >>with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    >>using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    >>probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    >>you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought into
    >>the picture.
    >>
    >>I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    >>3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    >>far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF I
    >>am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    >>they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move up
    >>to the Dimension 4700?
    >>
    >>THanks gang :).
    >>
    >> Marilyn B.
    >>
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I think your full of sh**, and possibly on the Dell payroll also .

    People turn computers back for a reason, and that is usually because
    it doesn't work properly. Just think about this a second, how often
    have any of you purchased a PC, spent a great deal of time loading all
    your stuff on it, had it for a few days and it works perfectly, and
    said... " I don't like this PC anymore, I am going to send it back.
    and get another? " ( probably not many of you are going to say that
    you did that.)

    Usually you return it because it crashes, or it won't boot up
    intermittently, or some other annoying trait, and Tech non- support
    in India is of no help at all. Then you send it back, Dell runs it in
    the shop for a few hours, and it is pronounced " refurbished". I work
    for a company that buy's 100's of thousands of dollars worth of PC's
    and they wouldn't buy a refurb on a dare...


    Bob


    On Fri, 27 May 2005 12:09:38 GMT, "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net>
    wrote:

    >Bob,
    >
    >You're full of SH**. What did Dell do to you in a prior life to be spewing
    >these falsehoods?
    >
    >Dell's refurbs are outstanding.
    >
    >Tom
    >"Capt Bob" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    >news:cnrd9113vgpe86tr4uq8d131cb0dcin5df@4ax.com...
    >> Do yourself and your daughter a favor and stay away from the
    >> refurbished ones. They are someone else's headache..
    >>
    >> Bob
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> On Thu, 26 May 2005 19:04:06 -0600, "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote:
    >>
    >>>probably the 4700 would be a better choice. I would avoid the Celeron
    >>>chips
    >>>and look for either a 533 or 800 MHz bus. Make sure you check
    >>>www.slickdeals.net or www.techbargains.com for specials form Dell and
    >>>don't
    >>>be afraid to look at the refurbished ones.
    >>>
    >>>www.dell.com\outlet She can get the student version of Office if she does
    >>>not already have a copy. I would spring for the 19" flat panel as Dell
    >>>seems to have it for about $250.00 fairly often. I just purchased one as
    >>>a
    >>>second monitor and it works great for a basic monitor.
    >>>
    >>>Wayne
    >>>
    >>>"Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    >>>news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >>>>
    >>>> My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    >>>> coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    >>>> doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write
    >>>> her
    >>>> papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    >>>> with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    >>>> using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    >>>> probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    >>>> you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought
    >>>> into
    >>>> the picture.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    >>>> 3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    >>>> far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF
    >>>> I
    >>>> am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    >>>> they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move
    >>>> up
    >>>> to the Dimension 4700?
    >>>>
    >>>> THanks gang :).
    >>>>
    >>>> Marilyn B.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>
    >
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Capt Bob" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message news:vk9f91d6ltrpg62pr8cpdctv25povodlqh@4ax.com...

    > People turn computers back for a reason, and that is usually because
    > it doesn't work properly. [] Usually you return it because it crashes,
    > or it won't boot up intermittently [] Then you send it back, Dell runs it in
    > the shop for a few hours, and it is pronounced " refurbished".

    April has been one of the best times to shop for a Dell deal, and this
    past April I closely monitored the Dell outlet and its 8400 selection.
    As in I was checking the site many times a day, each day. One of
    the things that surprised me was the quantity of machines that were
    showing up on the site. I obviously can't say for sure, but if I had to
    take a guess, I'd say that Dell sold many thousands of 8400s through
    the refurbished showroom during that month alone.

    At one point I actually began to wonder why so many systems were
    showing up at the outlet. I tend to agree with the idea that huge numbers
    of people don't return a system simply because they don't like it, and
    I suspect that most real issues are addressed through on-site warranty
    service. So I'm wondering if there is some other route into refurbed
    status. Two possibilities come to mind. First of all, cancelled orders.
    Assuming one can cancel an order after the build begins but before
    the system is ready to ship, what would Dell do with the system?
    Conceivably they could finish building the system and set it aside in
    anticipation of another order for the exact same config. But maybe
    it is better to avoid that kind of special handling and simply send those
    boxes to the reburb queue. Another question would be, how does
    Dell handle cases where a system fails acceptance tests? They could
    repair such systems as they are encountered and then ship them out.
    Or perhaps, at least in certain circumstances, maybe it is more
    efficient to simply put the system on the refurb queue and reinject
    the order?
  13. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Capt Bob wrote:

    > I think your full of sh**,

    Dude, you're looking in the mirror again.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sat, 28 May 2005 00:51:30 -0400, "User N" <usern@invalid.invalid>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Capt Bob" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message news:vk9f91d6ltrpg62pr8cpdctv25povodlqh@4ax.com...
    >
    >> People turn computers back for a reason, and that is usually because
    >> it doesn't work properly. [] Usually you return it because it crashes,
    >> or it won't boot up intermittently [] Then you send it back, Dell runs it in
    >> the shop for a few hours, and it is pronounced " refurbished".
    >
    >April has been one of the best times to shop for a Dell deal, and this
    >past April I closely monitored the Dell outlet and its 8400 selection.
    >As in I was checking the site many times a day, each day. One of
    >the things that surprised me was the quantity of machines that were
    >showing up on the site. I obviously can't say for sure, but if I had to
    >take a guess, I'd say that Dell sold many thousands of 8400s through
    >the refurbished showroom during that month alone.
    >
    >At one point I actually began to wonder why so many systems were
    >showing up at the outlet. I tend to agree with the idea that huge numbers
    >of people don't return a system simply because they don't like it, and
    >I suspect that most real issues are addressed through on-site warranty
    >service. So I'm wondering if there is some other route into refurbed
    >status. Two possibilities come to mind. First of all, cancelled orders.
    >Assuming one can cancel an order after the build begins but before
    >the system is ready to ship, what would Dell do with the system?
    >Conceivably they could finish building the system and set it aside in
    >anticipation of another order for the exact same config. But maybe
    >it is better to avoid that kind of special handling and simply send those
    >boxes to the reburb queue. Another question would be, how does
    >Dell handle cases where a system fails acceptance tests? They could
    >repair such systems as they are encountered and then ship them out.
    >Or perhaps, at least in certain circumstances, maybe it is more
    >efficient to simply put the system on the refurb queue and reinject
    >the order?


    We purchased about 10 8400's where I work and 2 employees each
    purchased one at about the same time. Out of 12 of these PC's, 4 had
    problems. Dell sent me a replacement after months of hassling with
    them about my out of the box faulty original 8400, and the replacement
    crashed about 20 minutes after I turned it on. I think it was a
    refurb. I immediately sent the replacement back to them, and my IT
    guy at work fixed my original 8400.

    Two of the 8400 problems turned out to be defective motherboards.
    That is a catastrophic failure rate for an electronic device in this
    day and age. This my be where all the "refurb" 8400's are coming
    from.

    Bob
  15. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Corporate returns of leased machines. Many companies for financial reasons
    lease hardware, some times for less than a year and then trade up.

    Other returns are from companies that went belly up and their assets have
    been sold off to satisfy creditors.

    While companies custom build PCs for the consumer market, many are mass
    produced for the commercial market. This in anticipation of large orders
    for matching machines with a certain amount of overage for the occasional
    lemon or machines damaged in transit.

    Then there are those that are custom built, but not what the client/customer
    wanted and so they come back and the order is adjusted to ship what ever the
    customer really wants.

    As for machine/component failure, there is the bath tub curve. It displays
    that the mean failure rate is high at the beginning of the equipments life
    cycle and then flattens out for a long period until structural fatigue
    begins to raise the mean failure rate again.

    The companies I personally know of that deal with returned equipment usually
    have a very fast turn around rate due to their experienced technicians, and
    ability to handle large volumes of returns with the parts they have on hand.
    They simple identify the failed component and replace it. They don't worry
    why or get to curious about it, they just fix it and move on. If anyone
    with a wealth of experience has an unlimited access to the parts on site and
    the diagnostic abilities to quickly ID the problem, then most systems can be
    taken care of can in under an hour.

    KC

    "User N" <usern@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:7vednaJ0JcdVZQrfRVn-ow@comcast.com...
    >
    > "Capt Bob" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:vk9f91d6ltrpg62pr8cpdctv25povodlqh@4ax.com...
    >
    > > People turn computers back for a reason, and that is usually because
    > > it doesn't work properly. [] Usually you return it because it crashes,
    > > or it won't boot up intermittently [] Then you send it back, Dell runs
    it in
    > > the shop for a few hours, and it is pronounced " refurbished".
    >
    > April has been one of the best times to shop for a Dell deal, and this
    > past April I closely monitored the Dell outlet and its 8400 selection.
    > As in I was checking the site many times a day, each day. One of
    > the things that surprised me was the quantity of machines that were
    > showing up on the site. I obviously can't say for sure, but if I had to
    > take a guess, I'd say that Dell sold many thousands of 8400s through
    > the refurbished showroom during that month alone.
    >
    > At one point I actually began to wonder why so many systems were
    > showing up at the outlet. I tend to agree with the idea that huge numbers
    > of people don't return a system simply because they don't like it, and
    > I suspect that most real issues are addressed through on-site warranty
    > service. So I'm wondering if there is some other route into refurbed
    > status. Two possibilities come to mind. First of all, cancelled orders.
    > Assuming one can cancel an order after the build begins but before
    > the system is ready to ship, what would Dell do with the system?
    > Conceivably they could finish building the system and set it aside in
    > anticipation of another order for the exact same config. But maybe
    > it is better to avoid that kind of special handling and simply send those
    > boxes to the reburb queue. Another question would be, how does
    > Dell handle cases where a system fails acceptance tests? They could
    > repair such systems as they are encountered and then ship them out.
    > Or perhaps, at least in certain circumstances, maybe it is more
    > efficient to simply put the system on the refurb queue and reinject
    > the order?
  16. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Get a laptop. Both of my college daughters use Dell laptops; the last one
    we bought was the Inspiron 600M in November.

    They take them to the library and to friends' houses, etc. to work on
    projects and aren't tied to a desktop.

    Get the 3 year "bumper to bumper" warranty in case she drops it or spills
    something on it.

    Get a built in modem and wireless so she can always access the internet.

    "Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >
    > My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    > coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    > doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write her
    > papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    > with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    > using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    > probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    > you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought into
    > the picture.
    >
    > I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    > 3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    > far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF I
    > am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    > they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move up
    > to the Dimension 4700?
    >
    > THanks gang :).
    >
    > Marilyn B.
    >
  17. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Marilyn,
    You should consider to have XP Pro installed on laptop/pc. It will enable
    the unit to connect to college and/or employer's network domains.

    --

    Rich/rerat

    (RRR News) <message rule>
    <<Previous Text Snipped to Save Bandwidth When Appropriate>>


    "Cathy De Viney" <NOSPAM.ccdeviney@cox.net> wrote in message
    news:NFwme.5666$fp.2043@fed1read05...
    Get a laptop. Both of my college daughters use Dell laptops; the last one
    we bought was the Inspiron 600M in November.

    They take them to the library and to friends' houses, etc. to work on
    projects and aren't tied to a desktop.

    Get the 3 year "bumper to bumper" warranty in case she drops it or spills
    something on it.

    Get a built in modem and wireless so she can always access the internet.

    "Marilyn E. Burford" <burford@chebucto.ns.ca> wrote in message
    news:Pine.GSO.3.95.iB1.0.1050526214552.10619A-100000@halifax.chebucto.ns.ca...
    >
    > My daughter (already graduated) is going to take a course or two this
    > coming fall while working full time. She is now in her own apt. and
    > doesn't want to be running out to my house to use my computer to write her
    > papers so is looking at buying one of her own, which I heartily agree
    > with. She isn't interested in gaming at all. Initially, all she would be
    > using a computer for would be for writing papers. Eventually, she'd
    > probably get internet, and maybe even just dialup, like I have, so then
    > you'd have web surfing, e-mailing and maybe downloading music brought into
    > the picture.
    >
    > I've been looking at Dell Canada's web site. D'yall think the Dimension
    > 3000 would do? They don't come with a floppy drive included do they, as
    > far as I can tell, so one would have to be ordered as an extra. Also, IF I
    > am understanding the info on the 3000, they DO come with a modem don't
    > they? AND...I believe six USB ports? Or would she be better off to move up
    > to the Dimension 4700?
    >
    > THanks gang :).
    >
    > Marilyn B.
    >
  18. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I have a 3000, and I can't say I'm pleased with its lack of graphics
    expandability. Mine came with a 3ghz Pentium 4 chip, which seems sort
    of sneaky to me: put a high-power CPU in the computer, with half a
    dozen USB ports - suggesting that it's near top-of the line. I now
    have a system with more CPU horsepower, but less potential graphics
    capability than the system I got in 2001. For your daughter's needs,
    basically any 3 year system will do - you won't need more than the
    CD-RW drive for downloading music, and she won't need a hyper-threading
    pentium chip to run WindowsXP or its office functions. Most computers
    come with a 56K modem for dial-up, and mine was even configured for DSL
    about 2 1/2 years before I mad the switch to broadband. The point is,
    that if your daughter's needs are modest, she may not even need to
    spend money on a lackluster and stunted Dell just to get that brand
    name. With a no-name you may not get that Dell maintenance base behind
    you...although from the flaming on this thread, maybe you don't want it.
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