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Windows proccesses ?

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Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:40:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

When I go to msconfig, which processes do I need to keep. Im down to 37
processes. I do have 512 MB ram which is sufficant, but when I am
playing a game sometimes I get a lag. This is also happening when I am
working on large graphics.
I am looking for a list of absalute bare mininumum of processes to keep
running. I did a google search and found some info but not a list of
which I am thinking of.
Docfl

More about : windows proccesses

Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:40:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"docfl" <docfl@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:p itme.79975$w15.40812@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> When I go to msconfig, which processes do I need to keep. Im down to 37
> processes. I do have 512 MB ram which is sufficant, but when I am playing
> a game sometimes I get a lag. This is also happening when I am working on
> large graphics.
> I am looking for a list of absalute bare mininumum of processes to keep
> running. I did a google search and found some info but not a list of which
> I am thinking of.
> Docfl


Doc,

First, being "down to 37" is a misnomer. Generally, one probably hopes to
end up with a dozen or even less enabled programs there. What I'm saying is
that your machine is still loaded up with unnecessary slag.

Here's a quick link, though I suspect you can find better by using
www.google.com :

http://www.pcpitstop.com/faq/disable.asp



Stew
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:40:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Try here:

http://www.answersthatwork.com/Tasklist_pages/tasklist....


"docfl" <docfl@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:p itme.79975$w15.40812@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> When I go to msconfig, which processes do I need to keep. Im down to 37
> processes. I do have 512 MB ram which is sufficant, but when I am
> playing a game sometimes I get a lag. This is also happening when I am
> working on large graphics.
> I am looking for a list of absalute bare mininumum of processes to keep
> running. I did a google search and found some info but not a list of
> which I am thinking of.
> Docfl
Related resources
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:40:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Unnecessary slag?"

There is so much hype on the web about Windows services. I'm so tired of it.
And that's exactly what it is: hype spewed by people with big egos who
imagine that they're doing something beneficial to their computers by
tinkering with the internal plumbing of Windows. [I'm obviously not
referring to you.]

Unless someone has a specific problem with a particular Windows service, the
only good reason to change the behavior of a service is for security.
Otherwise, in a computer that's properly equipped to run Windows XP, it
doesn't make a d**n bit of difference except in the mind of someone who
imagines themselves smarter than the designers of Windows.

The public newsgroups are filled with posts from people who mess up their
machines by playing with things they don't understand. And then a Service
Pack is issued that expects to see Windows configured properly, and when
that Service Pack destroys someone's computer whom do they blame?

OK, I'm off my soapbox.

Ted Zieglar

"S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:vPtme.44260$CR5.34522@bignews1.bellsouth.net...
>
> "docfl" <docfl@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:p itme.79975$w15.40812@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>> When I go to msconfig, which processes do I need to keep. Im down to 37
>> processes. I do have 512 MB ram which is sufficant, but when I am playing
>> a game sometimes I get a lag. This is also happening when I am working on
>> large graphics.
>> I am looking for a list of absalute bare mininumum of processes to keep
>> running. I did a google search and found some info but not a list of
>> which I am thinking of.
>> Docfl
>
>
> Doc,
>
> First, being "down to 37" is a misnomer. Generally, one probably hopes to
> end up with a dozen or even less enabled programs there. What I'm saying
> is that your machine is still loaded up with unnecessary slag.
>
> Here's a quick link, though I suspect you can find better by using
> www.google.com :
>
> http://www.pcpitstop.com/faq/disable.asp
>
>
>
> Stew
>
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:40:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:jaSdnZv_H5Z15AffRVn-sA@comcast.com...
> "Unnecessary slag?"
>


That's an accurate quote. I stand by it.


Stew
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:40:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Well, my friend, in that case my computer is filled with "unnecessary slag."
And she runs beautifully, as in speedy and reliable.

Ted Zieglar

"S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:zXume.37818$lQ3.3340@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
>
> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
> news:jaSdnZv_H5Z15AffRVn-sA@comcast.com...
>> "Unnecessary slag?"
>>
>
>
> That's an accurate quote. I stand by it.
>
>
> Stew
>
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:40:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:KNydnfqd_cFT4wffRVn-ug@comcast.com...
> Well, my friend, in that case my computer is filled with "unnecessary
> slag." And she runs beautifully, as in speedy and reliable.
>
> Ted Zieglar
>


Ted,

As the cliche' goes, "each to his own". And further, if that works for you
(and works well), cheers to you.

Obviously, the more powerful the system, the less of an issue it likely is.
And I'm guessing you're not running a 1.1GHz Celeron with 256mb and WinXP.

Stew
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:40:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Your guess is correct. In fact, I have a Dimension 4500. Not exactly stock:
I've added memory, improved the hard disks and replaced the video card, but
that's not why she runs so sweet.

My Dimension zings because I've learned how to run her well. After years of
fumbling in the dark with Windows, I found enlightenment. And one of the
things I learned is not to tweak things that don't really matter. If the
average user's computer performs so poorly that they have to drop otherwise
benign Windows services just to get acceptable performance, then it's time
for a new computer.

On the other hand, if someone wants to open 'er up to see what she can do
and they have a good backup, I'd say play with your computer until it starts
to smoke. Most users who ask 'what services they can do without' aren't
nearly that sophisticated.

Ted Zieglar

"S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:luvme.37885$lQ3.2684@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
>
> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
> news:KNydnfqd_cFT4wffRVn-ug@comcast.com...
>> Well, my friend, in that case my computer is filled with "unnecessary
>> slag." And she runs beautifully, as in speedy and reliable.
>>
>> Ted Zieglar
>>
>
>
> Ted,
>
> As the cliche' goes, "each to his own". And further, if that works for
> you (and works well), cheers to you.
>
> Obviously, the more powerful the system, the less of an issue it likely
> is. And I'm guessing you're not running a 1.1GHz Celeron with 256mb and
> WinXP.
>
> Stew
>
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:41:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:goWdnXx36_dfCQffRVn-3w@comcast.com...
> Your guess is correct. In fact, I have a Dimension 4500. Not exactly
> stock: I've added memory, improved the hard disks and replaced the video
> card, but that's not why she runs so sweet.
>
> My Dimension zings because I've learned how to run her well. After years
> of fumbling in the dark with Windows, I found enlightenment. And one of
> the things I learned is not to tweak things that don't really matter. If
> the average user's computer performs so poorly that they have to drop
> otherwise benign Windows services just to get acceptable performance, then
> it's time for a new computer.
>
> On the other hand, if someone wants to open 'er up to see what she can do
> and they have a good backup, I'd say play with your computer until it
> starts to smoke. Most users who ask 'what services they can do without'
> aren't nearly that sophisticated.
>
> Ted Zieglar
>

<snip>


For the record, I'm under the impression that the OP is referring to
msconfig/startup applications enabled, *not* services (msconfig/services).

Perhaps I've misinterpreted the OP's definition of "processes".

Obviously, there are a ton of services running on most all machines. I
currently have 81 (not that I've counted until tonight) enabled/running, and
I have no performance issues.


Stew
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 11:30:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Hogwash!!!



I run a Flight Simulator on my PC, with all kinds of add-ons. This
is just about the most demanding application that can be run on a home
PC. One way to increase frame rates and smoothness is to disable
non-essential programs and applications that are normally operating in
windows. A computer programmer has developed a program just for this
purpose called FSstart. I have about 50 items that are disabled when I
start up my Flight Sim. One thing this gives me immediately is about
175 megs of Ram ( which is directly measured by the program) , that
would be otherwise utilized for these non-essential background
services. The FSStart program even goes though the items that are
running and tells you what they do and which are safe to disable, when
you initially configure it. The program also restarts these services,
when you are though running Flight Sim, if you select that function.

Thousands of people , many of them very sophisticated PC users and
programmers, use this program and can directly measure the increase in
performance of their machines.

So your idea , that there is no difference in disabling some of the
background items, is ridiculous.


Bob






On Mon, 30 May 2005 00:21:28 -0400, "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com>
wrote:

>Your guess is correct. In fact, I have a Dimension 4500. Not exactly stock:
>I've added memory, improved the hard disks and replaced the video card, but
>that's not why she runs so sweet.
>
>My Dimension zings because I've learned how to run her well. After years of
>fumbling in the dark with Windows, I found enlightenment. And one of the
>things I learned is not to tweak things that don't really matter. If the
>average user's computer performs so poorly that they have to drop otherwise
>benign Windows services just to get acceptable performance, then it's time
>for a new computer.
>
>On the other hand, if someone wants to open 'er up to see what she can do
>and they have a good backup, I'd say play with your computer until it starts
>to smoke. Most users who ask 'what services they can do without' aren't
>nearly that sophisticated.
>
>Ted Zieglar
>
>"S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net> wrote in message
>news:luvme.37885$lQ3.2684@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
>>
>> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:KNydnfqd_cFT4wffRVn-ug@comcast.com...
>>> Well, my friend, in that case my computer is filled with "unnecessary
>>> slag." And she runs beautifully, as in speedy and reliable.
>>>
>>> Ted Zieglar
>>>
>>
>>
>> Ted,
>>
>> As the cliche' goes, "each to his own". And further, if that works for
>> you (and works well), cheers to you.
>>
>> Obviously, the more powerful the system, the less of an issue it likely
>> is. And I'm guessing you're not running a 1.1GHz Celeron with 256mb and
>> WinXP.
>>
>> Stew
>>
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 11:30:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"I run a Flight Simulator on my PC, with all kinds of add-ons. This is
just about the most demanding application that can be run on a home PC."

Read again. You're not the kind of user I'm talking about. There is no rule
that applies to every last user in the world.

Ted Zieglar

"Capt Bob" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:1mfl91da987nbl3hhiui1vipldatj68ajp@4ax.com...
> Hogwash!!!
>
>
>
> I run a Flight Simulator on my PC, with all kinds of add-ons. This
> is just about the most demanding application that can be run on a home
> PC. One way to increase frame rates and smoothness is to disable
> non-essential programs and applications that are normally operating in
> windows. A computer programmer has developed a program just for this
> purpose called FSstart. I have about 50 items that are disabled when I
> start up my Flight Sim. One thing this gives me immediately is about
> 175 megs of Ram ( which is directly measured by the program) , that
> would be otherwise utilized for these non-essential background
> services. The FSStart program even goes though the items that are
> running and tells you what they do and which are safe to disable, when
> you initially configure it. The program also restarts these services,
> when you are though running Flight Sim, if you select that function.
>
> Thousands of people , many of them very sophisticated PC users and
> programmers, use this program and can directly measure the increase in
> performance of their machines.
>
> So your idea , that there is no difference in disabling some of the
> background items, is ridiculous.
>
>
> Bob
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Mon, 30 May 2005 00:21:28 -0400, "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Your guess is correct. In fact, I have a Dimension 4500. Not exactly
>>stock:
>>I've added memory, improved the hard disks and replaced the video card,
>>but
>>that's not why she runs so sweet.
>>
>>My Dimension zings because I've learned how to run her well. After years
>>of
>>fumbling in the dark with Windows, I found enlightenment. And one of the
>>things I learned is not to tweak things that don't really matter. If the
>>average user's computer performs so poorly that they have to drop
>>otherwise
>>benign Windows services just to get acceptable performance, then it's time
>>for a new computer.
>>
>>On the other hand, if someone wants to open 'er up to see what she can do
>>and they have a good backup, I'd say play with your computer until it
>>starts
>>to smoke. Most users who ask 'what services they can do without' aren't
>>nearly that sophisticated.
>>
>>Ted Zieglar
>>
>>"S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net> wrote in message
>>news:luvme.37885$lQ3.2684@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
>>>
>>> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
>>> news:KNydnfqd_cFT4wffRVn-ug@comcast.com...
>>>> Well, my friend, in that case my computer is filled with "unnecessary
>>>> slag." And she runs beautifully, as in speedy and reliable.
>>>>
>>>> Ted Zieglar
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Ted,
>>>
>>> As the cliche' goes, "each to his own". And further, if that works for
>>> you (and works well), cheers to you.
>>>
>>> Obviously, the more powerful the system, the less of an issue it likely
>>> is. And I'm guessing you're not running a 1.1GHz Celeron with 256mb and
>>> WinXP.
>>>
>>> Stew
>>>
>
May 30, 2005 12:25:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Capt Bob" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:v1vl91pgj5a26h3rdscf5igg7gs03ndti8@4ax.com...

<snip>

> By the way , here is a link to the type of program that I am talking
> about, that will free up some of the PC's resources when running a
> game of any kind, not just Flight Sim.........
>
> http://www.kensalter.com/fsautostart/
>
>
> Bob

Most of the URL's" listed in http://www.kensalter.com/fsautostart
require account login and passwords.....

Here is more direct link to FSAutoStart program, no login or password
required
http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/System-Tweak/FSAutoS...

SteveR
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 12:31:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"SteveR" <nospam@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:_CDme.1628$xu3.27@lakeread02...
>
> "Capt Bob" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:v1vl91pgj5a26h3rdscf5igg7gs03ndti8@4ax.com...
>
> <snip>
>
>> By the way , here is a link to the type of program that I am talking
>> about, that will free up some of the PC's resources when running a
>> game of any kind, not just Flight Sim.........
>>
>> http://www.kensalter.com/fsautostart/
>>
>>
>> Bob
>
> Most of the URL's" listed in http://www.kensalter.com/fsautostart
> require account login and passwords.....
>
> Here is more direct link to FSAutoStart program, no login or password
> required
> http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/System-Tweak/FSAutoS...
>
> SteveR
>
>



Perhaps the OP, docfl, can explain whether he means services or startup
background apps. Until and unless he responds, I pretty much stick by what
I've posted.

If he's got 37 startup apps enabled, his machine performance is being
compromised to some degree depending on how much horsepower he has under the
hood.


Stew
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 12:42:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Ok Thanks to all. By processes I mean the number of processes in the
task manager. I know that Windows does require some to run correctly,
there are others that start that I do not need to run. I too play flight
sim games and do find that the lower the number of processes, the better
the game plays.
Again thanks to all for the information, and will review the web sites
mentioned.
docfl


snert wrote:
> Try here:
>
> http://www.answersthatwork.com/Tasklist_pages/tasklist....
>
>
> "docfl" <docfl@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:p itme.79975$w15.40812@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>
>>When I go to msconfig, which processes do I need to keep. Im down to 37
>>processes. I do have 512 MB ram which is sufficant, but when I am
>>playing a game sometimes I get a lag. This is also happening when I am
>>working on large graphics.
>>I am looking for a list of absalute bare mininumum of processes to keep
>>running. I did a google search and found some info but not a list of
>>which I am thinking of.
>>Docfl
>
>
>
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 12:42:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"docfl" <docfl@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:mmAme.83361$w15.11570@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> Ok Thanks to all. By processes I mean the number of processes in the task
> manager. I know that Windows does require some to run correctly, there are
> others that start that I do not need to run. I too play flight sim games
> and do find that the lower the number of processes, the better the game
> plays.
> Again thanks to all for the information, and will review the web sites
> mentioned.
> docfl
>


Hey doc - ?

What machine model and what CPU and RAM specs.....and what OS?


Stew
May 30, 2005 12:49:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"docfl" <docfl@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:p itme.79975$w15.40812@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> When I go to msconfig, which processes do I need to keep. Im down to 37
> processes. I do have 512 MB ram which is sufficant, but when I am playing
> a game sometimes I get a lag. This is also happening when I am working on
> large graphics.
> I am looking for a list of absalute bare mininumum of processes to keep
> running. I did a google search and found some info but not a list of which
> I am thinking of.
> Docfl

Windows Process Library
http://www.liutilities.com/products/wintaskspro/process...

SteveR
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 7:15:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:uyEme.20925$6k7.10731@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
>
>
> Perhaps the OP, docfl, can explain whether he means services or startup
> background apps. Until and unless he responds, I pretty much stick by
> what I've posted.
>
> If he's got 37 startup apps enabled, his machine performance is being
> compromised to some degree depending on how much horsepower he has under
> the hood.
>
>
> Stew
>

Do you not think that Microsoft have been instrumental in muddying the
waters though?

I'd describe myself as computer-literate and yet I wouldn't have a clue if
it was safe to disable most of the (45 on this machine) processes running in
Task Manager.

"Generic Host Processes is trying to access the internet" screams ZoneAlarm.
Sometimes if I say no then I simply can't access the internet. Full stop.
Other times, clicking no doesn't seem to make an iota of difference.

So to access the internet, I sometimes have no choice but to click
yes.........so what information is Billy Gates then helping himself to from
my machine?

"Generic Host Processes wants to accept connections from the
internet"..........what's that all about?

And why does Windows Explorer want to access the internet?

There are currently *seven* instances of svchost.exe appearing in Task
manager/Processes. Surely XP doesn't need to run the same program seven
times?

It's one big confusing mess!
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 7:15:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Do you really think that "Billy Gates" gives a plugged nickel for what's on
your computer? Only a paranoid or a conspiracy theorist would think so, and
you don't impress me as either.

If you want to know what Generic Host Process is doing, learn about it. It's
explained in detail on the internet (also in earlier posts to the
newsgroups, when XP first came out.) Don't blame Billy Gates if you don't
have the time or the ability to understand Windows. I'll bet you have both.

Ted Zieglar

"Nick Cleevely" <postmaster@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
news:G6Gme.15279$Li.11109@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
>
> "S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net> wrote in message
> news:uyEme.20925$6k7.10731@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
>>
>>
>> Perhaps the OP, docfl, can explain whether he means services or startup
>> background apps. Until and unless he responds, I pretty much stick by
>> what I've posted.
>>
>> If he's got 37 startup apps enabled, his machine performance is being
>> compromised to some degree depending on how much horsepower he has under
>> the hood.
>>
>>
>> Stew
>>
>
> Do you not think that Microsoft have been instrumental in muddying the
> waters though?
>
> I'd describe myself as computer-literate and yet I wouldn't have a clue if
> it was safe to disable most of the (45 on this machine) processes running
> in Task Manager.
>
> "Generic Host Processes is trying to access the internet" screams
> ZoneAlarm. Sometimes if I say no then I simply can't access the internet.
> Full stop. Other times, clicking no doesn't seem to make an iota of
> difference.
>
> So to access the internet, I sometimes have no choice but to click
> yes.........so what information is Billy Gates then helping himself to
> from my machine?
>
> "Generic Host Processes wants to accept connections from the
> internet"..........what's that all about?
>
> And why does Windows Explorer want to access the internet?
>
> There are currently *seven* instances of svchost.exe appearing in Task
> manager/Processes. Surely XP doesn't need to run the same program seven
> times?
>
> It's one big confusing mess!
>
>
>
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 7:15:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Nick Cleevely" <postmaster@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
news:G6Gme.15279$Li.11109@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
>
> "S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net> wrote in message
> news:uyEme.20925$6k7.10731@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
>>
>>
>> Perhaps the OP, docfl, can explain whether he means services or startup
>> background apps. Until and unless he responds, I pretty much stick by
>> what I've posted.
>>
>> If he's got 37 startup apps enabled, his machine performance is being
>> compromised to some degree depending on how much horsepower he has under
>> the hood.
>>
>>
>> Stew
>>
>
> Do you not think that Microsoft have been instrumental in muddying the
> waters though?
>
> I'd describe myself as computer-literate and yet I wouldn't have a clue if
> it was safe to disable most of the (45 on this machine) processes running
> in Task Manager.
>
> "Generic Host Processes is trying to access the internet" screams
> ZoneAlarm. Sometimes if I say no then I simply can't access the internet.
> Full stop. Other times, clicking no doesn't seem to make an iota of
> difference.
>
> So to access the internet, I sometimes have no choice but to click
> yes.........so what information is Billy Gates then helping himself to
> from my machine?
>
> "Generic Host Processes wants to accept connections from the
> internet"..........what's that all about?
>
> And why does Windows Explorer want to access the internet?
>
> There are currently *seven* instances of svchost.exe appearing in Task
> manager/Processes. Surely XP doesn't need to run the same program seven
> times?
>
> It's one big confusing mess!


I'm not going to get into the middle of this argument but I thought I'd help
shed some light on svchosts.exe. Here is the definition from MS Support as
found in this support article http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=314056:

Svchost.exe is a generic host process name for services that run from
dynamic-link libraries (DLLs).

Unfortunately, virus and trojan writers have tapped into svchost to launch
their malicious apps so it's hard to tell if the svchosts you see un taskman
are legit or not.

With that said, unless you really know what you are doing and do all the
necessary research, I'd suggest leaving the system alone. I've had to
repair countless pcs where the user thought they knew what they were doing
in ended up making the system run worse or not at all.

My advice; leave well enough alone and make sure you have the proper among
of RAM and processor(s) to run the software you need.

Rob
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 8:04:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Mon, 30 May 2005 08:31:30 -0500, "S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net>
wrote:

<SNIP>
>If he's got 37 startup apps enabled, his machine performance is being
>compromised to some degree depending on how much horsepower he has under the
>hood.
>
>
>Stew
>
>
If he's got 37 startup apps enabled, his machine performance is being
compromised to some degree depending on how much horsepower AND MEMORY he has
under the hood. Many of the startup apps are passive most of the time (e.g.
NAV's email virus monitoring app), while some intervene and monitor some element
of the system continuously. With memory being as cheap as it is (except
RAMBUS), it makes good sense to throw more memory at the performance problem.
This is usually a lot easier and less time consuming than tweaking the startup
apps, but more expensive. Still, tweaking the startup apps often makes more
memory available, but only if you know what you are doing AND there is some clue
of information about what the startup apps actually do.

Some of the 1000% superfluous startup apps I've seen:

Applets to tweak graphics and monitor settings, which can be done just as easily
thru the Display icon in control panel. How often do people usually need to
tweak graphics and monitor settings anyway?

Printer monitoring applets, which are usually started up automatically when you
print.

CD burning applets, which make it one or two clicks easier to start a CD burning
program.

Well, maybe there is something to be gained by disabling startup apps. To each
his or her own... Ben Myers
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 9:51:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:429b3791.9866757@nntp.charter.net...
> On Mon, 30 May 2005 08:31:30 -0500, "S.Lewis"
> <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net>
> wrote:
>
> <SNIP>
>>If he's got 37 startup apps enabled, his machine performance is being
>>compromised to some degree depending on how much horsepower he has under
>>the
>>hood.
>>
>>
>>Stew
>>
>>
> If he's got 37 startup apps enabled, his machine performance is being
> compromised to some degree depending on how much horsepower AND MEMORY he
> has
> under the hood. Many of the startup apps are passive most of the time
> (e.g.
> NAV's email virus monitoring app), while some intervene and monitor some
> element
> of the system continuously. With memory being as cheap as it is (except
> RAMBUS), it makes good sense to throw more memory at the performance
> problem.
> This is usually a lot easier and less time consuming than tweaking the
> startup
> apps, but more expensive. Still, tweaking the startup apps often makes
> more
> memory available, but only if you know what you are doing AND there is
> some clue
> of information about what the startup apps actually do.
>
> Some of the 1000% superfluous startup apps I've seen:
>
> Applets to tweak graphics and monitor settings, which can be done just as
> easily
> thru the Display icon in control panel. How often do people usually need
> to
> tweak graphics and monitor settings anyway?
>
> Printer monitoring applets, which are usually started up automatically
> when you
> print.
>
> CD burning applets, which make it one or two clicks easier to start a CD
> burning
> program.
>
> Well, maybe there is something to be gained by disabling startup apps. To
> each
> his or her own... Ben Myers


Ben,

Ya gotta love all of the HP entries, especially if the unit is an
all-in-one. :) 


Stew
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 1:44:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Im running win xp, 512 ram(max for this system) and a 1.7 P4 in an
inspiron 2650. I am running AVG, Zone Alarm.
Thanks for the info people.
docfl
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 4:51:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Robert R Kircher, Jr. wrote:

<snip>

> I'm not going to get into the middle of this argument but I thought I'd help
> shed some light on svchosts.exe. Here is the definition from MS Support as
> found in this support article http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=314056:

Bum link.
!