sun's effect on wireless

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Does any one know if the heat of the sun can affect a wireless network?
We're using Netgear gear.

Ours keeps going off in the day (during this fine weather) but is fine at
night, early morning and early evening.

cheers

Al
11 answers Last reply
More about effect wireless
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Enta News wrote:

    > Does any one know if the heat of the sun can affect a wireless network?
    > We're using Netgear gear.
    >
    > Ours keeps going off in the day (during this fine weather) but is fine at
    > night, early morning and early evening.
    >
    > cheers
    >
    > Al

    Heat can definitely cause adverse affects but only if your equipment is
    exposed to heat. Other possibilities come to mind, such as maybe during
    the day someone else nearby is using a wireless device that kills your
    signal... do you have some potent flourescent lights maybe?
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Are you operating this equipment from a flat rock in the middle of the
    desert?

    Excessive heat can affect any electronic equipment, but it's unlikely to be
    the cause of your problems.

    What exactly happens when your service "goes off"? Do you lose wireless
    connectivity to the router, or are you simply unable to access the internet?
    Without more specific information, possibilities include excessive internet
    traffic and radio interference.

    "Enta News" <thisisnot@realemailaddress> wrote in message
    news:40aa2eed.0@entanet...
    > Does any one know if the heat of the sun can affect a wireless network?
    > We're using Netgear gear.
    >
    > Ours keeps going off in the day (during this fine weather) but is fine at
    > night, early morning and early evening.
    >
    > cheers
    >
    > Al
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    We are going a few miles across countryside. We lose wireless connectivity
    to the router.
    We can rule out excessive internet traffic.
    We point the network in four different directions from the top of a church
    tower, and there are problems in more than one direction.

    cheers

    Alan

    "gary" <pleasenospam@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    news:_uzqc.1223$rc6.414@newssvr23.news.prodigy.com...
    > Are you operating this equipment from a flat rock in the middle of the
    > desert?
    >
    > Excessive heat can affect any electronic equipment, but it's unlikely to
    be
    > the cause of your problems.
    >
    > What exactly happens when your service "goes off"? Do you lose wireless
    > connectivity to the router, or are you simply unable to access the
    internet?
    > Without more specific information, possibilities include excessive
    internet
    > traffic and radio interference.
    >
    > "Enta News" <thisisnot@realemailaddress> wrote in message
    > news:40aa2eed.0@entanet...
    > > Does any one know if the heat of the sun can affect a wireless network?
    > > We're using Netgear gear.
    > >
    > > Ours keeps going off in the day (during this fine weather) but is fine
    at
    > > night, early morning and early evening.
    > >
    > > cheers
    > >
    > > Al
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    This is taking place over several miles in different directions and so is
    unlikely to be another wireless device.

    cheers

    "Rôgêr" <abuse@your.isp.com> wrote in message
    news:87KdnVuWyJT0UDfdRVn-ug@pghconnect.com...
    > Enta News wrote:
    >
    > > Does any one know if the heat of the sun can affect a wireless network?
    > > We're using Netgear gear.
    > >
    > > Ours keeps going off in the day (during this fine weather) but is fine
    at
    > > night, early morning and early evening.
    > >
    > > cheers
    > >
    > > Al
    >
    > Heat can definitely cause adverse affects but only if your equipment is
    > exposed to heat. Other possibilities come to mind, such as maybe during
    > the day someone else nearby is using a wireless device that kills your
    > signal... do you have some potent flourescent lights maybe?
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Enta News wrote:
    > Does any one know if the heat of the sun can affect a wireless network?

    Yes, it can.

    Two possibilities come to mind:

    The trivial idea is to look at connectors, antennas etc., everything
    exposed to direct sunlight. Maybe some contact inside a connector breaks
    up due to the thermal size changes when heated/cooled.

    The other possibility is existing, although only seldom. Is this a long
    distance link, maybe spanning a valley?
    We have had problems with a real long distance link crossing the River
    Rhein valley. In summer the air was heated and stared to rise in bubbles
    from the valley. These bubbles are definetely of a different density and
    lead to refractions and reflections which can severely influence a
    microwave link. Afterwards we found out that this is a well known
    phenomenom on links over valley and troughs, where the air is not
    exchanged horizontally, but can only rise vertically, i.e. on a windless
    day.

    Regards,
    Ekki
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Yes this is a long distance affair, altogether covering over ten mile with
    Hop Stations, and it certainly goes through the countryside, with valleys
    and hills (they tend to go hand in hand don't they!). So you may be on to it
    there.

    Any known solutions?

    Alan

    "Ekki Plicht" <df4or@web.de> wrote in message news:c8f38t$6gt$1@online.de...
    > Enta News wrote:
    > > Does any one know if the heat of the sun can affect a wireless network?
    >
    > Yes, it can.
    >
    > Two possibilities come to mind:
    >
    > The trivial idea is to look at connectors, antennas etc., everything
    > exposed to direct sunlight. Maybe some contact inside a connector breaks
    > up due to the thermal size changes when heated/cooled.
    >
    > The other possibility is existing, although only seldom. Is this a long
    > distance link, maybe spanning a valley?
    > We have had problems with a real long distance link crossing the River
    > Rhein valley. In summer the air was heated and stared to rise in bubbles
    > from the valley. These bubbles are definetely of a different density and
    > lead to refractions and reflections which can severely influence a
    > microwave link. Afterwards we found out that this is a well known
    > phenomenom on links over valley and troughs, where the air is not
    > exchanged horizontally, but can only rise vertically, i.e. on a windless
    > day.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ekki
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Someone else suggested looking at all connections for evidence of
    contraction/expansion problems. If your equipment is in weather-proof
    enclosures (outdoor equipment should be), are you getting condensation
    problems on humid days? What about wind - is your antenna moving slightly?

    "Enta News" <thisisnot@realemailaddress> wrote in message
    news:40ab1ab8.0@entanet...
    > We are going a few miles across countryside. We lose wireless connectivity
    > to the router.
    > We can rule out excessive internet traffic.
    > We point the network in four different directions from the top of a church
    > tower, and there are problems in more than one direction.
    >
    > cheers
    >
    > Alan
    >
    > "gary" <pleasenospam@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    > news:_uzqc.1223$rc6.414@newssvr23.news.prodigy.com...
    > > Are you operating this equipment from a flat rock in the middle of the
    > > desert?
    > >
    > > Excessive heat can affect any electronic equipment, but it's unlikely to
    > be
    > > the cause of your problems.
    > >
    > > What exactly happens when your service "goes off"? Do you lose wireless
    > > connectivity to the router, or are you simply unable to access the
    > internet?
    > > Without more specific information, possibilities include excessive
    > internet
    > > traffic and radio interference.
    > >
    > > "Enta News" <thisisnot@realemailaddress> wrote in message
    > > news:40aa2eed.0@entanet...
    > > > Does any one know if the heat of the sun can affect a wireless
    network?
    > > > We're using Netgear gear.
    > > >
    > > > Ours keeps going off in the day (during this fine weather) but is fine
    > at
    > > > night, early morning and early evening.
    > > >
    > > > cheers
    > > >
    > > > Al
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    As of this writing you have several suggestions:
    (1) Direct sunlight induced thermal effects on equipment.
    These can affect electronics, cabling/connectors, and
    even focus - if mounts (including buildings/towers)
    shift even slightly for any reason (including thermal).
    (2) Heat-induced refraction layers. Sources can include not
    only the rolling countryside effects mentioned but also
    such heat sources as large paved areas (not necessarily
    blacktop), factories, railroad roundhouses and railyards,
    and any number of like scenarios.

    You might also consider carefully that there are some radio-
    frequency operations that might present interference during
    daylight hours. Lowpower radio transmitters are one example;
    in an urban area it's possible that crowds of people on
    cellphones (and using other wireless gear) might present
    a problem. And atmospheric thermal refraction effects that
    might redirect any number of distant transmissions at one
    or more of your antennas are another example.

    Enta News wrote:

    > Does any one know if the heat of the sun can affect a wireless network?
    > We're using Netgear gear.
    >
    > Ours keeps going off in the day (during this fine weather) but is fine at
    > night, early morning and early evening.
    >
    > cheers
    >
    > Al
    >
    >


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  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    When I use my microwave oven, my wireless does not work.

    Klaus
    VirtualTuner.com


    "gary" <pleasenospam@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message news:<nlKqc.10001$SZ.5947@newssvr24.news.prodigy.com>...
    > Someone else suggested looking at all connections for evidence of
    > contraction/expansion problems. If your equipment is in weather-proof
    > enclosures (outdoor equipment should be), are you getting condensation
    > problems on humid days? What about wind - is your antenna moving slightly?
    >
    > "Enta News" <thisisnot@realemailaddress> wrote in message
    > news:40ab1ab8.0@entanet...
    > > We are going a few miles across countryside. We lose wireless connectivity
    > > to the router.
    > > We can rule out excessive internet traffic.
    > > We point the network in four different directions from the top of a church
    > > tower, and there are problems in more than one direction.
    > >
    > > cheers
    > >
    > > Alan
    > >
    > > "gary" <pleasenospam@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    > > news:_uzqc.1223$rc6.414@newssvr23.news.prodigy.com...
    > > > Are you operating this equipment from a flat rock in the middle of the
    > > > desert?
    > > >
    > > > Excessive heat can affect any electronic equipment, but it's unlikely to
    > be
    > > > the cause of your problems.
    > > >
    > > > What exactly happens when your service "goes off"? Do you lose wireless
    > > > connectivity to the router, or are you simply unable to access the
    > internet?
    > > > Without more specific information, possibilities include excessive
    > internet
    > > > traffic and radio interference.
    > > >
    > > > "Enta News" <thisisnot@realemailaddress> wrote in message
    > > > news:40aa2eed.0@entanet...
    > > > > Does any one know if the heat of the sun can affect a wireless
    > network?
    > > > > We're using Netgear gear.
    > > > >
    > > > > Ours keeps going off in the day (during this fine weather) but is fine
    > at
    > > > > night, early morning and early evening.
    > > > >
    > > > > cheers
    > > > >
    > > > > Al
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 19 May 2004 01:11:42 -0700, Enta News wrote
    (in article <40ab1791.0@entanet>):

    > Yes this is a long distance affair, altogether covering over ten mile with
    > Hop Stations, and it certainly goes through the countryside, with valleys
    > and hills (they tend to go hand in hand don't they!). So you may be on to it
    > there.

    Humidity is a problem to radio waves. During the day the air will always
    contain more humidity, increasing proportionally to the temperature.

    > Any known solutions?

    Higher-power transmitters, higher-gain antennas (at both ends), better
    antenna placement, more "Hop Stations"...

    Maybe if you describe the type of equipment you have, in detail, we could
    offer some suggestions.
    --
    DaveC
    me@privacy.net
    This is an invalid return address
    Please reply in the news group
  11. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Enta News wrote:

    > Yes this is a long distance affair, altogether covering over ten mile with
    > Hop Stations, and it certainly goes through the countryside, with valleys
    > and hills (they tend to go hand in hand don't they!). So you may be on to it
    > there.
    >
    > Any known solutions?

    1.) Higher Power (antennas with higher gain)
    2.) Shorter Links
    3.) Lower frequency

    Regards,
    Ekki
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