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Is Windows MCE built on Windows Pro?

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Anonymous
May 31, 2005 12:40:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

The reason I ask this question is that I was rebuilding a HD for my new
Inspiron 9300 that came with MCE (Media Center Edition) and during the XP
installation process it asked questions and otherwise gave me the impression
that it was installing Pro (it asked if I wanted to join a domain and there
were other indications that I can't recall right now).

Mike
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 6:57:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Sort of. You can setup a domain at installation time, but I don't believe
you can change domains after that. It includes Remote Desktop, which is a
Pro only feature.

It's sort of 'half way' between Home and Pro.

Tom
"Mike Marquis" <mmarquis@raytheon.com> wrote in message
news:iOZme.3$w42.2@dfw-service2.ext.ray.com...
> The reason I ask this question is that I was rebuilding a HD for my new
> Inspiron 9300 that came with MCE (Media Center Edition) and during the XP
> installation process it asked questions and otherwise gave me the
> impression
> that it was installing Pro (it asked if I wanted to join a domain and
> there
> were other indications that I can't recall right now).
>
> Mike
>
>
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 7:53:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Mike Marquis" <mmarquis@raytheon.com> wrote in message
news:iOZme.3$w42.2@dfw-service2.ext.ray.com...
| The reason I ask this question is that I was rebuilding a HD for my new
| Inspiron 9300 that came with MCE (Media Center Edition) and during the XP
| installation process it asked questions and otherwise gave me the
impression
| that it was installing Pro (it asked if I wanted to join a domain and
there
| were other indications that I can't recall right now).
|
| Mike
|


This topic has been well hashed over in the Newsgroup
microsoft.public.windows.mediacenter .

It's not surprising that there is confusion on the subject as Microsoft
doesn't even seem to know. If you look at

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/mediacenter/evaluati...

You'll find it states "Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 is the first
consumer OS built on top of the Windows XP Home..." That statement is
incorrect. As you correctly surmised the ability to join a domain (only
available at the initial installation) indicates that it is "built" on XP
Pro. If you choose to join a domain during installation you won't be able to
use media center extenders. MCE uses that area to support extender features.

Further if you examine a Media Center PC you'll find it supports Remote
Desktop, Multi-processor support, Automated System Recovery, Dynamic Disk
Support, Internet information Services/Personal Web Server, Encrypting File
System, File-level access control. All available in XP Pro. All available in
Media Center Edition 2005. None available in XP Home.

--
Doug

I'm not an MVP a VIP nor do I have ESP.
I was just trying to help.
Please use your own best judgment before implementing any suggestions or
advice herein.
No warranty is expressed or implied.
Your mileage may vary.
See store for details. :) 

Remove shoes to E-mail.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 11:58:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"HillBillyBuddhist" <hillbillybuddhistshoes@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:IL%me.11033$XA6.3349@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
> "Mike Marquis" <mmarquis@raytheon.com> wrote in message
> news:iOZme.3$w42.2@dfw-service2.ext.ray.com...
> | The reason I ask this question is that I was rebuilding a HD for my new
> | Inspiron 9300 that came with MCE (Media Center Edition) and during the
XP
> | installation process it asked questions and otherwise gave me the
> impression
> | that it was installing Pro (it asked if I wanted to join a domain and
> there
> | were other indications that I can't recall right now).
> |
> | Mike
> |
>
>
> This topic has been well hashed over in the Newsgroup
> microsoft.public.windows.mediacenter .
>
> It's not surprising that there is confusion on the subject as Microsoft
> doesn't even seem to know. If you look at
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/mediacenter/evaluati...
>
> You'll find it states "Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 is the first
> consumer OS built on top of the Windows XP Home..." That statement is
> incorrect. As you correctly surmised the ability to join a domain (only
> available at the initial installation) indicates that it is "built" on XP
> Pro. If you choose to join a domain during installation you won't be able
to
> use media center extenders. MCE uses that area to support extender
features.
>
> Further if you examine a Media Center PC you'll find it supports Remote
> Desktop, Multi-processor support, Automated System Recovery, Dynamic Disk
> Support, Internet information Services/Personal Web Server, Encrypting
File
> System, File-level access control. All available in XP Pro. All available
in
> Media Center Edition 2005. None available in XP Home.
>
> --
> Doug
>
> I'm not an MVP a VIP nor do I have ESP.
> I was just trying to help.
> Please use your own best judgment before implementing any suggestions or
> advice herein.
> No warranty is expressed or implied.
> Your mileage may vary.
> See store for details. :) 
>
> Remove shoes to E-mail.
>
Thank-you. I was wondering what the differences were. As far as naming a
domain, I reckon that's a business case, and maybe part of the dot Net or
maybe D-Com thingie. Let's try and define those in layman's terms:

Remote Desktop Support (I guess that's allowing someone to "shadow" you, and
maybe diagnose a problem as if they were sitting at your desktop
Multi-Processor (OK, SMP and the other one? No bother, but good to know)
Automated System Recovery (Can't I just go into *Safe* mode?)
Encrypting File System (Other than NTFS? maybe I'm confused)
File-level access control (I guess that's administrative privileges, huh?)

At one time, there was very little difference between NT desktop and NT
server. So most IT folk just installed NT Server on their desktop.

So, do most tecchies just install Windows Server 2003 now, instead?

Trying to play catch up. I realize this post is OT. Sorry.

Mr. Curious.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 4:27:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"ng_reader" <wilgrow_co@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ivudneVeo6lUZAHfRVn-gA@comcast.com...
>
> "HillBillyBuddhist" <hillbillybuddhistshoes@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:IL%me.11033$XA6.3349@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
>> "Mike Marquis" <mmarquis@raytheon.com> wrote in message
>> news:iOZme.3$w42.2@dfw-service2.ext.ray.com...
>> | The reason I ask this question is that I was rebuilding a HD for my new
>> | Inspiron 9300 that came with MCE (Media Center Edition) and during the
> XP
>> | installation process it asked questions and otherwise gave me the
>> impression
>> | that it was installing Pro (it asked if I wanted to join a domain and
>> there
>> | were other indications that I can't recall right now).
>> |
>> | Mike
>> |
>>
>>
>> This topic has been well hashed over in the Newsgroup
>> microsoft.public.windows.mediacenter .
>>
>> It's not surprising that there is confusion on the subject as Microsoft
>> doesn't even seem to know. If you look at
>>
>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/mediacenter/evaluati...
>>
>> You'll find it states "Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 is the first
>> consumer OS built on top of the Windows XP Home..." That statement is
>> incorrect. As you correctly surmised the ability to join a domain (only
>> available at the initial installation) indicates that it is "built" on XP
>> Pro. If you choose to join a domain during installation you won't be able
> to
>> use media center extenders. MCE uses that area to support extender
> features.
>>
>> Further if you examine a Media Center PC you'll find it supports Remote
>> Desktop, Multi-processor support, Automated System Recovery, Dynamic Disk
>> Support, Internet information Services/Personal Web Server, Encrypting
> File
>> System, File-level access control. All available in XP Pro. All available
> in
>> Media Center Edition 2005. None available in XP Home.
>>
>> --
>> Doug
>>
>> I'm not an MVP a VIP nor do I have ESP.
>> I was just trying to help.
>> Please use your own best judgment before implementing any suggestions or
>> advice herein.
>> No warranty is expressed or implied.
>> Your mileage may vary.
>> See store for details. :) 
>>
>> Remove shoes to E-mail.
>>
> Thank-you. I was wondering what the differences were. As far as naming a
> domain, I reckon that's a business case, and maybe part of the dot Net or
> maybe D-Com thingie. Let's try and define those in layman's terms:
>
> Remote Desktop Support (I guess that's allowing someone to "shadow" you,
> and
> maybe diagnose a problem as if they were sitting at your desktop
> Multi-Processor (OK, SMP and the other one? No bother, but good to know)
> Automated System Recovery (Can't I just go into *Safe* mode?)
> Encrypting File System (Other than NTFS? maybe I'm confused)
> File-level access control (I guess that's administrative privileges, huh?)
>
> At one time, there was very little difference between NT desktop and NT
> server. So most IT folk just installed NT Server on their desktop.
>
> So, do most tecchies just install Windows Server 2003 now, instead?
>
> Trying to play catch up. I realize this post is OT. Sorry.
>
> Mr. Curious.

http://www.winsupersite.com/showcase/windowsxp_home_pro...

--
D
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 4:27:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"HillBillyBuddhist" <hillbillybuddhist@shoesgmail.com> wrote in message
news:Kh7ne.14075$JX5.2794@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
> "ng_reader" <wilgrow_co@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:ivudneVeo6lUZAHfRVn-gA@comcast.com...
> >
> > "HillBillyBuddhist" <hillbillybuddhistshoes@gmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:IL%me.11033$XA6.3349@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
> >> "Mike Marquis" <mmarquis@raytheon.com> wrote in message
> >> news:iOZme.3$w42.2@dfw-service2.ext.ray.com...
> >> | The reason I ask this question is that I was rebuilding a HD for my
new
> >> | Inspiron 9300 that came with MCE (Media Center Edition) and during
the
> > XP
> >> | installation process it asked questions and otherwise gave me the
> >> impression
> >> | that it was installing Pro (it asked if I wanted to join a domain and
> >> there
> >> | were other indications that I can't recall right now).
> >> |
> >> | Mike
> >> |
> >>
> >>
> >> This topic has been well hashed over in the Newsgroup
> >> microsoft.public.windows.mediacenter .
> >>
> >> It's not surprising that there is confusion on the subject as Microsoft
> >> doesn't even seem to know. If you look at
> >>
> >>
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/mediacenter/evaluati...
> >>
> >> You'll find it states "Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 is the
first
> >> consumer OS built on top of the Windows XP Home..." That statement is
> >> incorrect. As you correctly surmised the ability to join a domain (only
> >> available at the initial installation) indicates that it is "built" on
XP
> >> Pro. If you choose to join a domain during installation you won't be
able
> > to
> >> use media center extenders. MCE uses that area to support extender
> > features.
> >>
> >> Further if you examine a Media Center PC you'll find it supports Remote
> >> Desktop, Multi-processor support, Automated System Recovery, Dynamic
Disk
> >> Support, Internet information Services/Personal Web Server, Encrypting
> > File
> >> System, File-level access control. All available in XP Pro. All
available
> > in
> >> Media Center Edition 2005. None available in XP Home.
> >>
> >> --
> >> Doug
> >>
> >> I'm not an MVP a VIP nor do I have ESP.
> >> I was just trying to help.
> >> Please use your own best judgment before implementing any suggestions
or
> >> advice herein.
> >> No warranty is expressed or implied.
> >> Your mileage may vary.
> >> See store for details. :) 
> >>
> >> Remove shoes to E-mail.
> >>
> > Thank-you. I was wondering what the differences were. As far as naming
a
> > domain, I reckon that's a business case, and maybe part of the dot Net
or
> > maybe D-Com thingie. Let's try and define those in layman's terms:
> >
> > Remote Desktop Support (I guess that's allowing someone to "shadow" you,
> > and
> > maybe diagnose a problem as if they were sitting at your desktop
> > Multi-Processor (OK, SMP and the other one? No bother, but good to know)
> > Automated System Recovery (Can't I just go into *Safe* mode?)
> > Encrypting File System (Other than NTFS? maybe I'm confused)
> > File-level access control (I guess that's administrative privileges,
huh?)
> >
> > At one time, there was very little difference between NT desktop and NT
> > server. So most IT folk just installed NT Server on their desktop.
> >
> > So, do most tecchies just install Windows Server 2003 now, instead?
> >
> > Trying to play catch up. I realize this post is OT. Sorry.
> >
> > Mr. Curious.
>
> http://www.winsupersite.com/showcase/windowsxp_home_pro...
>
> --
> D
>
>

Thanks. Good page good site.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 4:43:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"ng_reader" <wilgrow_co@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ivudneVeo6lUZAHfRVn-gA@comcast.com...
> Remote Desktop Support (I guess that's allowing someone to "shadow" you,
> and
> maybe diagnose a problem as if they were sitting at your desktop

No, no, no.

Remote Desktop allows you to remote control the PC yourself. For example,
I'm typing this on my Thinkpad X40. It's in a window that is my Dimension
4550 and the newsreader is running on the Dimension.

Very, very handy.

Tom
!