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Laptop/Tablet for College

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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February 7, 2013 1:44:38 AM

1. What is your budget?

No idea, I'd like to keep it as cheap as possible, but I can go up to say, $2000.

2. What is the size of the notebook that you are considering?

For a tablet, 10ish inches, for a laptop, greater than 15?

3. What screen resolution do you want?

High resolution. 1080p or greater.

4. Do you need a portable or desktop replacement laptop?

Thats part of my debate.

5. How much battery life do you need?

At least 4 hours. The more, the better.

6. Do you want to play games with your laptop? If so then please list the games that you want to with the settings that you want for these games. (Low,Medium or High)?

CS:S, BF3, SupCom2, medium would be fine. But I don't expect to do a lot of gaming on this.

7. What other tasks do you want to do with your laptop? (Photo/Video editing, Etc.)

Premiere Pro, CS/CE programs (no clue what programs i'd need) MANY Chrome tabs (>20), OneNote

8. How much storage (Hard Drive capacity) do you need?

500GB for laptop, 32GB for tablet: SSD preferred.

9. If you are considering specific sites to buy from, please post their links.

Newegg, MFG's site, where ever.

10. How long do you want to keep your laptop?

College: at least 4 years. Unless upgrading after two years would be better.

11. What kind of Optical drive do you need? DVD ROM/Writer,Bluray ROM/Writer,Etc ?

Don't need it. Preferably without to make it lighter.

12. Please tell us about the brands that you prefer to buy from them and the brands that you don't like and explain the reasons.

I like Lenovos, but don't really have a brand preference. Do you think a retina Macbook Pro would be best for me? Suggest it! Asus? Sure! Sager? Why not?

13. What country do you live in?

America

14. Please tell us any additional information if needed.

So here's the deal. I need to get a mobile computer for college. I currently have a very good desktop that i'm planning on taking to college (i7 3930k, 32GB RAM, 120GB SSD). I'm debating between something like the Thinkpad W520 as a mobile workstation that I can type notes and do some heavy things. Maybe play a little games here and there, and something like the Surface Pro or Thinkpad Helix, which have styluses for notes, which would be nice, and RDP into my dorm room computer if I need to run heavy programs. I don't know what kind of stuff I need, so any advice would be appreciated! (By the way, I'm either going into Computer Engineering or Computer Science, probably CE). If its light, thats a plus. But I'm used to carrying heavy books in my backpack.

TL;DR?

I need something for college. I'm thinking either a workstation to do everything on, or a tablet for just notes, and RDP into my main desktop when necessary. I need recommendations. I'm going into either CS or CE.

PS: Im not in a rush to buy this. I'll either be buying something in either June or a few weeks before I start college. I'm only looking for a general idea of what to go with.

More about : laptop tablet college

February 7, 2013 1:55:08 AM

I think it really depends if you'll need it for use inside the classroom. I know for my some of my classes I needed my laptop to run excel on a few occasions. If you already have a desktop I wouldn't bother getting a bulky laptop with bad battery life. I have a gaming desktop in my dorm and a netbook for anything outside the dorm. If you won't be doing a lot of graphing/word processing then I think a tablet would be sufficient.
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February 7, 2013 2:04:26 AM

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1683...

The MSi Ge60 is a 15.6inch 1080p laptop that is capable of running most games at very high settings while retaining good temperatures. I got this laptop when it first released (~6 months ago iirc) and its been working fine. It is pretty light weight and the screen is pretty good.

Some criterias that do not really fit with your requests would be the battery life (~3 hours on word / surfing the web) but other than that... it should be great! (Its pretty cheap too!).
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February 7, 2013 2:36:05 AM

my experience was that laptop usage declined severely after the first semester. i never brought a laptop to class after my first year because in lecture halls you always have small desktops that a laptop barely fits on. its way more convenient to write notes on paper. plus if you ever have to draw graphs diagrams or anything other then text, taking notes on a laptop is even less appealing. thats with a laptop though. with a tablet its a little different but the main thing is that having tablet is a big distraction with the internet a finger away.

honestly i would recommend a cheap ultrabook. you are in college and the probability of you breaking your laptop is high so its a little worrisome to buy a 2k laptop.

what you do want is PORTABILITY trust me a medium to large laptop is so annoying to haul around campus. so heres my recommendation:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

game on your desktop and then this can do everything else. they are never going to ask you to do any projects on a program that a 300 dollar laptop cant do. if they do reconsider your college choice lol honestly. Plus most of the programs should be on a software remote site too.

btw where you going to school. i too went to a engineering school but for ME & IE
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a c 433 D Laptop
February 7, 2013 2:44:50 PM

$2,000 is a lot of money to play around with especially if you are not going to buy a laptop with a powerful graphics chip. You can buy both laptop and tablet.

Since you are not going to buy a laptop until the summer, you should start doing research in June when Intel is going to announce the release of their Haswell CPU. It will offer a little better CPU processing performance over Ivy Bridge, and will also consume less power. That means longer battery life unless the battery is shrunk down. The biggest difference is the graphics core.

The Intel HD 4600 (or maybe it's called the HD 5000) was demoed last Sep at an electronics trade show. It was capable of playing Skyrim at 1920x1080 with high quality graphics. No benchmarks were shown, but the video showed that at least it seemed to run pretty smoothly. I am sure Anti-Aliasing was switched off.

Anyway, you can buy a laptop to do homework with and a tablet for taking notes in class since a 10.1" tablet should fit on a small desk. There are plenty of 10.1" tablets out there (but not with 1920x1080 resolution) and they can be used to write notes in class. However, you may want to consider something that has built-in handwriting recognition software like the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1. Whatever you write will be converted over to text and you can also draw diagrams.

For other tablets without built-in handwriting recognition software you can simply buy an app ($10 - $15). There aren't any free ones, but there are few trial versions out there to try out before buying.
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February 7, 2013 2:51:26 PM

I agree with Jaguarskx.
Best thing to do would be to wait for Haswell. And then buy both.

I use my 17 inch gaming laptop for notes all the time, the worst part about it is that it weighs 8 lb..

Since you have a nice desktop, I'd definitely wait and then get both.
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February 7, 2013 3:17:55 PM

I think you're a perfect candidate for a tablet for college.

If you have an awesome desktop and you're taking it to college, then I would just get you something that will work for productivity purposes and web browsing.

iOS/Android tablets do offer gaming options, but they're games that were specifically designed to run on those platforms and in most cases the higher quality graphical options are not cheap. If you want to go that rout, choose the operating system that you use for your cell phone. If you have an iPhone, get an iPad. If you have one of the 50 million android phones, get an ASUS Transformer Pad Infinity or the Nexus 10. All 3 are great tablets that are portable, battery efficient and have great screen resolution.

I was an iPad user for about a year - loved the device, was very convenient for when I was at home and wanted to look something up but I don't travel enough to make it worth the while so I sold it before the iPad3 came out. I personally find that I am more on the go now and want a tablet, but I am leaning toward the Surface Pro or Razer Edge - tablet form factor with full desktop operating system capabilities.
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February 7, 2013 11:27:31 PM

See the thing is, I dont want to worry about three different devices. And gaming really isn't that important to me. I'm really leaning towards a tablet for the portability and hand written notes, but the only worry is whether it'll be enough to run programs I need for class. I have no idea what programs I need to run and whether a tablet can do it. Like I said before, heavy computing can be done on the desktop, but what about in class?

And that 2000 is roughly what i'm willing to spend. If I can go with a lot cheaper, great.
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a c 433 D Laptop
February 8, 2013 12:23:03 AM

You may want to consider the soon to be released 13.3" Asus Transformer Book. Similar to the Asus Transformer family of Android tablets, this is a tablet with a keyboard. However, it do not run Android OS. It does not run Windows RT which is used by Windows based tablets....


The Asus Transformer Book will have a choice of a Core i5 or Core i7 CPU (both are ivy Bride CPUs) and it runs Windows 8. It is a full fledged convertible laptop much like the Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga, and Lenovo ThinkPad Twist. However, the keyboard is detachable. So you can run off to class with Transformer Book taking only the "panel" with you and leaving the keyboard at home / dorm. That makes the Transformer extremely portable and versatile.

Since there are plenty of convertible laptops right now, you can do a search for Windows 8 compatible handwriting recognition software. It will have a resolution of 1920x1080. I think this bridges the gap between the best of both worlds. A portable tablet, yet a powerful enough laptop. It should be capable of playing some PC games with the Intel HD 4000, but it is recommended that you play at 1366x768 resolution. And you have the ability to install any Windows compatible programs you like such as MS Office (which absolutely does not exist for Android OS).

No release date been announced, but then again you are not in a rush. Estimated price is $1,300 for the Core i5 version and $1,500 for the Core i7 version.

http://www.cnet.com/laptops/asus-transformer-book-tx300...

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February 8, 2013 1:54:04 AM

bookwormsy said:
See the thing is, I dont want to worry about three different devices. And gaming really isn't that important to me. I'm really leaning towards a tablet for the portability and hand written notes, but the only worry is whether it'll be enough to run programs I need for class. I have no idea what programs I need to run and whether a tablet can do it. Like I said before, heavy computing can be done on the desktop, but what about in class?

And that 2000 is roughly what i'm willing to spend. If I can go with a lot cheaper, great.


you will never be asked to do something in class that a tablet cant do. you gotta think that a lot of kids arent going to bring laptops to class and even some dont have a laptop. A professor is rarely going to expect everyone to have/bring a laptop. the classes i took that required a laptop/computer, the computer was provided.
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a c 433 D Laptop
February 8, 2013 2:20:30 AM

^^^

While not everyone will have a laptop or tablet, it can come in handy. A lot of textbooks are in some type of e-book format and carrying around a tablet / laptop with all your books can be more convenient and definitely a lot less lighter than a few textbooks. Also textbooks are expensive these days. I was floored when someone told me that a new Intermediate Accounting textbook was $100. I forgot what she said the price of the ebook version was, but it was definitely less than $100.

Having the capability to take notes on a tablet is pretty convenient as well. You don't need separate notebooks for each class. Everything (notes and textbooks) are on one mobile device. Thus cutting down on weight even more. So while not a requirement, a laptop or tablet definitely has it's advantages.

Of course the big disadvantage of having everything in one device is that if it is lost or stolen... well... let's just say try not to let that happen....


Also, the requirements can be different for different schools. For example, my former manager moved to one of the more affluent community in Connecticut (I forgot which one), basically because of an elementary school and mid / junior high school which were rated amongst the top 10 in the nation. I kidded around with him a lot by calling him the dredge of society because he and his wife's combined income less than the average income for that community... by a decent amount.

Anywaste... even though his kids were in elementary school all students were required to have an Apple iPad. It was mandatory. No exceptions. All books were ebooks only. All homework assignments must be e-mailed to the teacher. All in class assignments and activities required an iPad. Basically if you are able to afford to live in that affluent community in Connecticut, then you should have enough money to shell out several hundred $ for a stupid iPad for your kid(s).
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February 8, 2013 2:54:35 AM

jaguarskx said:
^^^

While not everyone will have a laptop or tablet, it can come in handy. A lot of textbooks are in some type of e-book format and carrying around a tablet / laptop with all your books can be more convenient and definitely a lot less lighter than a few textbooks. Also textbooks are expensive these days. I was floored when someone told me that a new Intermediate Accounting textbook was $100. I forgot what she said the price of the ebook version was, but it was definitely less than $100.

Having the capability to take notes on a tablet is pretty convenient as well. You don't need separate notebooks for each class. Everything (notes and textbooks) are on one mobile device. Thus cutting down on weight even more. So while not a requirement, a laptop or tablet definitely has it's advantages.

Of course the big disadvantage of having everything in one device is that if it is lost or stolen... well... let's just say try not to let that happen....


Also, the requirements can be different for different schools. For example, my former manager moved to one of the more affluent community in Connecticut (I forgot which one), basically because of an elementary school and mid / junior high school which were rated amongst the top 10 in the nation. I kidded around with him a lot by calling him the dredge of society because he and his wife's combined income less than the average income for that community... by a decent amount.

Anywaste... even though his kids were in elementary school all students were required to have an Apple iPad. It was mandatory. No exceptions. All books were ebooks only. All homework assignments must be e-mailed to the teacher. All in class assignments and activities required an iPad. Basically if you are able to afford to live in that affluent community in Connecticut, then you should have enough money to shell out several hundred $ for a stupid iPad for your kid(s).


while i agree with everything you said it basically boils down to preference not need. that was my only point.
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February 8, 2013 12:32:17 PM

jaguarskx said:
You may want to consider the soon to be released 13.3" Asus Transformer Book. Similar to the Asus Transformer family of Android tablets, this is a tablet with a keyboard. However, it do not run Android OS. It does not run Windows RT which is used by Windows based tablets....


The Asus Transformer Book will have a choice of a Core i5 or Core i7 CPU (both are ivy Bride CPUs) and it runs Windows 8. It is a full fledged convertible laptop much like the Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga, and Lenovo ThinkPad Twist. However, the keyboard is detachable. So you can run off to class with Transformer Book taking only the "panel" with you and leaving the keyboard at home / dorm. That makes the Transformer extremely portable and versatile.

Since there are plenty of convertible laptops right now, you can do a search for Windows 8 compatible handwriting recognition software. It will have a resolution of 1920x1080. I think this bridges the gap between the best of both worlds. A portable tablet, yet a powerful enough laptop. It should be capable of playing some PC games with the Intel HD 4000, but it is recommended that you play at 1366x768 resolution. And you have the ability to install any Windows compatible programs you like such as MS Office (which absolutely does not exist for Android OS).

No release date been announced, but then again you are not in a rush. Estimated price is $1,300 for the Core i5 version and $1,500 for the Core i7 version.

http://www.cnet.com/laptops/asus-transformer-book-tx300...



I do like the Transformer book concept - if they had a 1080p screen, I would personally have been sold.
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a b D Laptop
February 8, 2013 12:52:54 PM

if you can wait, Concur with jaguarskx. Windows RT on a ultralite is an excellent choice.
Review of Surface Pro:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6695/microsoft-surface-pr...
NOTE: will improe with newer releases.

If just a tablet, then this is what I bought:
Asus tf-700, 1.6 Ghz and 32 gig, 1920x1200 display (love the display) then procedded to add:
.. 32 gig microSD card to take it to 64 gigs ( cheaper than going with the 64 gig model)
.. detachable Keyboard. Normally around $150, BUT the 200 model KB works and Ofice depot had a clearance, so only $70.
.. Added a 64 gig SD card to the keyboard. Well worth the 70 bucks as it adds an etra battery, SD slot and USB2 connectivity.
.. since it also has a USB port, I have several 32 & 64 gig SSD to share with it. Stock about 24 DVDs/Blu-ray movies that I had converted to the andriod format to enjoy while on Plane, or at work (after hours -LOLs)

Full specs: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6834230482
PS I bought the CG model, slightly more than the normal Grey - But like to be different, LOLs

Some reviews:
http://www.mobiletechreview.com/tablets/Asus-Transforme...
http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/25/asus-transformer-pad...

Extract from: http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-Asus-Transformer-Pa...
The display deserves special praise. Asus uses the Super IPS panel which has great viewing angles. The screen is bright, has great contrast and is very sharp. The touch screen works well which makes the use of the Transformer Pad Infinity TF700T a real pleasure - indoors and outdoors. And that is what every tablet buyer wants, right
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a c 433 D Laptop
February 8, 2013 5:15:11 PM

game junky said:
I do like the Transformer book concept - if they had a 1080p screen, I would personally have been sold.


As I stated, it does have a 1920x1080 screen.

I also stated that if you were to play games on it, then you will want to play them at 1366x768 resolution since the Transformer Book will be using the Intel HD 4000 integrated graphics core.
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Best solution

February 8, 2013 6:21:57 PM

Just a bit of a advice from personal experience using laptops in high school and college.

Take note of the weight and battery life of the things. These two little factors don't sound like much but they add up fast. The gaming laptops while they sound nice and light at 8-10lbs they add up to weighing more quite fast as thats what my first laptop was. 10lb laptop + spare battery 2lbs + charger +2lbs + other equipment and laptop backpack being heavier 6lbs = 20lbs of additional weight I ended up lugging every time I brought that one to school and I had to bring it all that because the battery life sucked, and I wasn't going to bring the lighter backpack that didn't protect it. Not to mention the extra bulk this adds is VERY annoying and makes it difficult to carry more than 1 text book.

Current laptop, is actually ARM based samsung chromebook, what I carry when I go to class. Chromebook + protective cover = still under 3lbs. Battery life is good enough to last through any class and I can take notes online or offline and do everything I need for college. Also at $270 after tax it's cheap enough that I don't feel like I have a large steal me sign on the thing. And this takes up the same amount of room as a notebook roughly.

As for using a stylus for taking notes in terms of tablets, I have played around with that. I be honest it really sucks as a method of taking notes in my opinion and most people I have talked to. Same story with trying to use a tablet to take notes by typing on it, tried it and hated it. And most people I know who tried doing the same stopped after a few days in class. Tried to even justify the Asus Transformer for school in the past though for that I couldn't after research as what I found was that it was lacking in what it could do from what I heard after trying to find reviews from students trying to use it in school. Now the touch screen laptops are another case, I haven't looked into and won't comment on. But I imagine the stylus being used on it will still be a lesson in frustration compared to pen and paper unless you have a good hand writing recognition software.

From my experience the best combo is a cheap lightweight laptop with excellent battery life paired up with a notebook and pen. Use the laptop to take notes (and record lectures if you want, just get it cleared by instructor) and use the notebook to write down math formulas, diagrams, etc. And than latter put it in the laptop when you have time, or take a picture/scan it in. You can write down "fig 1" and refer to that in notes and put "insert fig 1 here" etc, to make life easier. This is the type of thing I do. Also a bit of advice use dropbox, skydrive, or something of that nature to quickly upload your work and notes online and sync with your home computer. I guarantee you this will save you more than once and just make life easier.

Also keep in mind your laptop is mobile and used on the go it is a good idea to note keep any sensitive information off it. And have the browser never remember passwords, etc on it. And if you do please use encryption. These things have a habit of going missing or getting stolen. And don't leave it in plain view in a car, I know someone who had their netbook stolen that way and they lost almost all their notes for nursing school and work they did. (Also why I recommended things such as dropbox.)

As for what I would recommend you to get. I honestly wouldn't get a gaming laptop despite you having the money. Weight adds up quick for when you want to do that with batteries, charger, mouse, etc and you already have a good desktop for that from the sounds of it. And I be honest you'll most likely makes friends and hang out with them during the time in between classes, study, or find some way to kill time. I want to recommend the same chromebook I have for you but with how you may be a CE or CS major I can't as you most likely be using some specific programs you like if you go that route. So my advice try to keep the laptop reasonably lightweight and small (under 6lbs and resonably thin so you can still fit books) and if you want to make it all 4 years of college 7+ hours of battery life or close to it as you can get. You will likely have some days where you have multiple classes in the same day and at one point in your college career be in class for over 8h+ in a day and not having to be near a wall outlet will make life easier. Not to mention the days you forget to charge it or go from class directly to studygroup or something along those lines and don't get a chance to charge it.

Just thought I try to depart some of my experience of using a laptop in a school enviroment for you, as I know everything wasn't how I expected it to be when I tried going this route at first. And just a heads up some teachers don't allow laptops to be used in class as they expect students to do everything but take notes and study (facebook, instant messaging, etc) and to be blunt they are right some students do that. Just do us a favor as a fellow student if you do that, sit in the back as people WILL look at your laptop to see what you are doing as you are a distraction weither you are taking notes or on facebook/gaming/etc.

Oh and just a note on ebooks they are handy but you are limited in what you can do with them. And you are not actually buying it generally you are renting it for a set period of time and you can't sell them back. So lower upfront cost, lightweight if you are using a laptop. But you generally need an internet connection to access it. And you can't sell it back to the school or online, though most will allow you to highlight areas of the book online. If it's general ed class I go the ebook route, if it's something your interested in buy the book so you can review it latter down your career and use it as a reference. And buying books online is SIGNIFICANTLY cheaper than the schools bookstore. Get amazon prime or amazon prime student (they have trail) or whatever it's called the 2day shipping will help you in a pinch you for some reason didn't buy your books before class started. Though personally I consider the 2day shipping and free access to a lot of shows and movies worth he cost of prime, especially if your in college away from home and your movie collection.
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February 9, 2013 3:03:39 AM

RetiredChief said:
if you can wait, Concur with jaguarskx. Windows RT on a ultralite is an excellent choice.
Review of Surface Pro:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6695/microsoft-surface-pr...
NOTE: will improe with newer releases.

If just a tablet, then this is what I bought:
Asus tf-700, 1.6 Ghz and 32 gig, 1920x1200 display (love the display) then procedded to add:
.. 32 gig microSD card to take it to 64 gigs ( cheaper than going with the 64 gig model)
.. detachable Keyboard. Normally around $150, BUT the 200 model KB works and Ofice depot had a clearance, so only $70.
.. Added a 64 gig SD card to the keyboard. Well worth the 70 bucks as it adds an etra battery, SD slot and USB2 connectivity.
.. since it also has a USB port, I have several 32 & 64 gig SSD to share with it. Stock about 24 DVDs/Blu-ray movies that I had converted to the andriod format to enjoy while on Plane, or at work (after hours -LOLs)

Full specs: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6834230482
PS I bought the CG model, slightly more than the normal Grey - But like to be different, LOLs

Some reviews:
http://www.mobiletechreview.com/tablets/Asus-Transforme...
http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/25/asus-transformer-pad...

Extract from: http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-Asus-Transformer-Pa...
The display deserves special praise. Asus uses the Super IPS panel which has great viewing angles. The screen is bright, has great contrast and is very sharp. The touch screen works well which makes the use of the Transformer Pad Infinity TF700T a real pleasure - indoors and outdoors. And that is what every tablet buyer wants, right


Thats interesting. Another good possibility.
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February 9, 2013 3:04:55 AM

assasin32 said:
Just a bit of a advice from personal experience using laptops in high school and college.

Take note of the weight and battery life of the things. These two little factors don't sound like much but they add up fast. The gaming laptops while they sound nice and light at 8-10lbs they add up to weighing more quite fast as thats what my first laptop was. 10lb laptop + spare battery 2lbs + charger +2lbs + other equipment and laptop backpack being heavier 6lbs = 20lbs of additional weight I ended up lugging every time I brought that one to school and I had to bring it all that because the battery life sucked, and I wasn't going to bring the lighter backpack that didn't protect it. Not to mention the extra bulk this adds is VERY annoying and makes it difficult to carry more than 1 text book.

Current laptop, is actually ARM based samsung chromebook, what I carry when I go to class. Chromebook + protective cover = still under 3lbs. Battery life is good enough to last through any class and I can take notes online or offline and do everything I need for college. Also at $270 after tax it's cheap enough that I don't feel like I have a large steal me sign on the thing. And this takes up the same amount of room as a notebook roughly.

As for using a stylus for taking notes in terms of tablets, I have played around with that. I be honest it really sucks as a method of taking notes in my opinion and most people I have talked to. Same story with trying to use a tablet to take notes by typing on it, tried it and hated it. And most people I know who tried doing the same stopped after a few days in class. Tried to even justify the Asus Transformer for school in the past though for that I couldn't after research as what I found was that it was lacking in what it could do from what I heard after trying to find reviews from students trying to use it in school. Now the touch screen laptops are another case, I haven't looked into and won't comment on. But I imagine the stylus being used on it will still be a lesson in frustration compared to pen and paper unless you have a good hand writing recognition software.

From my experience the best combo is a cheap lightweight laptop with excellent battery life paired up with a notebook and pen. Use the laptop to take notes (and record lectures if you want, just get it cleared by instructor) and use the notebook to write down math formulas, diagrams, etc. And than latter put it in the laptop when you have time, or take a picture/scan it in. You can write down "fig 1" and refer to that in notes and put "insert fig 1 here" etc, to make life easier. This is the type of thing I do. Also a bit of advice use dropbox, skydrive, or something of that nature to quickly upload your work and notes online and sync with your home computer. I guarantee you this will save you more than once and just make life easier.

Also keep in mind your laptop is mobile and used on the go it is a good idea to note keep any sensitive information off it. And have the browser never remember passwords, etc on it. And if you do please use encryption. These things have a habit of going missing or getting stolen. And don't leave it in plain view in a car, I know someone who had their netbook stolen that way and they lost almost all their notes for nursing school and work they did. (Also why I recommended things such as dropbox.)

As for what I would recommend you to get. I honestly wouldn't get a gaming laptop despite you having the money. Weight adds up quick for when you want to do that with batteries, charger, mouse, etc and you already have a good desktop for that from the sounds of it. And I be honest you'll most likely makes friends and hang out with them during the time in between classes, study, or find some way to kill time. I want to recommend the same chromebook I have for you but with how you may be a CE or CS major I can't as you most likely be using some specific programs you like if you go that route. So my advice try to keep the laptop reasonably lightweight and small (under 6lbs and resonably thin so you can still fit books) and if you want to make it all 4 years of college 7+ hours of battery life or close to it as you can get. You will likely have some days where you have multiple classes in the same day and at one point in your college career be in class for over 8h+ in a day and not having to be near a wall outlet will make life easier. Not to mention the days you forget to charge it or go from class directly to studygroup or something along those lines and don't get a chance to charge it.

Just thought I try to depart some of my experience of using a laptop in a school enviroment for you, as I know everything wasn't how I expected it to be when I tried going this route at first. And just a heads up some teachers don't allow laptops to be used in class as they expect students to do everything but take notes and study (facebook, instant messaging, etc) and to be blunt they are right some students do that. Just do us a favor as a fellow student if you do that, sit in the back as people WILL look at your laptop to see what you are doing as you are a distraction weither you are taking notes or on facebook/gaming/etc.

Oh and just a note on ebooks they are handy but you are limited in what you can do with them. And you are not actually buying it generally you are renting it for a set period of time and you can't sell them back. So lower upfront cost, lightweight if you are using a laptop. But you generally need an internet connection to access it. And you can't sell it back to the school or online, though most will allow you to highlight areas of the book online. If it's general ed class I go the ebook route, if it's something your interested in buy the book so you can review it latter down your career and use it as a reference. And buying books online is SIGNIFICANTLY cheaper than the schools bookstore. Get amazon prime or amazon prime student (they have trail) or whatever it's called the 2day shipping will help you in a pinch you for some reason didn't buy your books before class started. Though personally I consider the 2day shipping and free access to a lot of shows and movies worth he cost of prime, especially if your in college away from home and your movie collection.


This is good information. Thanks. I have many different options. Luckily I have months to think about it. Thanks all
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February 9, 2013 3:05:06 AM

Best answer selected by bookwormsy.
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