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Can i use a dell laptop's powerpack to charge an hp laptop

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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February 12, 2013 1:20:41 PM

Hello,my power pack blew,so i want to find out can i use a dell laptop powerpack of 19.5v and slightly lower amperage than my hp laptop of 19v and 4.5A? thanks
February 12, 2013 1:23:08 PM

If they have the same connection and the same Amps, voltage can be slightly off and still work but Amps can burn your laptop up.
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a b D Laptop
February 12, 2013 1:54:38 PM

Exactly it's the amps that's really important to check otherwise you could damage it.
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February 12, 2013 3:00:30 PM

Don't forget to make sure the connection has the same poles (depending on your laptop it can be positive (+) in the middle and negative (-) on the outside or the other way around entirely)
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a b D Laptop
February 12, 2013 3:16:00 PM

@ warezme and nexmorbus.
On Amps.
For the "brick" this is simply a max rating at which the rated Voltage can be supplied. If the output deice draws More currnt than this then the output voltage will drop. This value has NO relationship to what the "real" current is. Real current is dictated by the ouput device impeadance (Resistance) and the amount of Voltage supplied to the device (Current = Voltage divided by Resistance).

Correct answer is, If it fits (sometimes the outside of the barrow oes fit but the center hole is to large) and the Polarity is correct (as nexmorbus pointed out). While that is pretty mch standorized probably should be verified.
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a b D Laptop
February 12, 2013 3:27:27 PM

I was gonna say that AMPS do NOT fry things.

I have an old Cannon printer power supply running a 5.1 x 2 in 5.1 out analog mixer and its rating is WAY over what the thing uses(we are talking about something that is good for at LEAST 1+ amp and a device taking 0.052 amps[it only takes what it needs]. Truly it is the most inefficient setup ever, but all the other power supplies made too much humm and my filtering sucks).
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a b D Laptop
February 12, 2013 3:56:24 PM

^ Lots of laughs. You could always build a better PSU using a series regulated design. Quite, Very low output ripple/noise, abiet not as eff.
But on topic what you stated is 100% correct in this case.
When applied to a electric Fryng pan, well I guess it is the amps that generate the heat: Power = Current X voltage - LOL
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a c 248 D Laptop
February 12, 2013 5:03:46 PM

Hi :) 

The PA series of Dell chargers have a very different centre sensor pin to HP ones...

I wouldn't try it, and I own a Lappy repair company...

All the best Brett :) 
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a b D Laptop
February 12, 2013 5:34:56 PM

RetiredChief said:
^ Lots of laughs. You could always build a better PSU using a series regulated design. Quite, Very low output ripple/noise, abiet not as eff.
But on topic what you stated is 100% correct in this case.
When applied to a electric Fryng pan, well I guess it is the amps that generate the heat: Power = Current X voltage - LOL

Have good beginners guide? I have no clue of the proper coil values for a cap/coil/cap filter. I think that is all I need. I never knew how bad power supplies could be before trying to use one for audio.
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a c 248 D Laptop
February 12, 2013 5:40:38 PM

Best answer selected by Brett928S2.
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a c 248 D Laptop
February 12, 2013 5:40:42 PM

This topic has been closed by Brett928S2
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