Trouble copying partition in Windows XP

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

Posted for a friend who's having trouble making a copy of a hard drive as
backup.

I’ve been using Acronis True Image 8, and trying to copy my primary boot
partition to a much larger hard drive. Using the Disk Clone tool I get a perfect
copy except for one problem. When I boot on the cloned drive, windows XP doesn’t
see the other two hard drives in the system. If I install the original boot
drive back, and click on My Computer, everything is fine. Any suggestions?
7 answers Last reply
More about trouble copying partition windows
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    Yes, go to the Acronis True Image * website and ask them for help.

    "rfdjr@aol.com" wrote:

    > Posted for a friend who's having trouble making a copy of a hard drive as
    > backup.
    >
    > I’ve been using Acronis True Image 8, and trying to copy my primary boot
    > partition to a much larger hard drive. Using the Disk Clone tool I get a perfect
    > copy except for one problem. When I boot on the cloned drive, windows XP doesn’t
    > see the other two hard drives in the system. If I install the original boot
    > drive back, and click on My Computer, everything is fine. Any suggestions?
    >
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    <rfdjr@aol.com> wrote:
    > Posted for a friend who's having trouble making a copy
    > of a hard drive as backup.
    >
    > I've been using Acronis True Image 8, and trying to copy
    > my primary boot partition to a much larger hard drive.
    > Using the Disk Clone tool I get a perfect copy except for
    > one problem. When I boot on the cloned drive, windows XP
    > doesn't see the other two hard drives in the system. If I
    > install the original boot drive back, and click on My Computer,
    > everything is fine. Any suggestions?


    This may or may not have anything to do with your problem,
    but proper procedure in making a clone (that may be used with
    the original "parent" system visible to it at some time) is to
    remove the "parent" before the FIRST bootup of the clone. If
    this isn't done, the clone sets links to various files in the "parent"
    system, thus making the clone forever dependent on the
    continued presence of the "parent". But after booting the clone
    for the first time with the "parent" system absent, the clone will
    become an independent "adult", and it can thereafter be booted
    with the "parent" present and visible to it, and it will see the
    "parent" as just another "Local Disk" (i.e. partition) with an access-
    ible file structure. Of course, if the clone will only be used if the
    "parent" system's HD dies, this problem never arises.

    *TimDaniels*
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    Not following you on the parent/adult connection, or how to "remove the parent"
    before the first boot up of the clone. Is the parent system the hardware the
    clone is being made on i.e. the motherboard, RAM, etc? If so, how can it be
    removed?? Thanks.

    ><rfdjr@aol.com> wrote:
    >> Posted for a friend who's having trouble making a copy
    >> of a hard drive as backup.
    >>
    >> I've been using Acronis True Image 8, and trying to copy
    >> my primary boot partition to a much larger hard drive.
    >> Using the Disk Clone tool I get a perfect copy except for
    >> one problem. When I boot on the cloned drive, windows XP
    >> doesn't see the other two hard drives in the system. If I
    >> install the original boot drive back, and click on My Computer,
    >> everything is fine. Any suggestions?
    >
    >
    > This may or may not have anything to do with your problem,
    >but proper procedure in making a clone (that may be used with
    >the original "parent" system visible to it at some time) is to
    >remove the "parent" before the FIRST bootup of the clone. If
    >this isn't done, the clone sets links to various files in the "parent"
    >system, thus making the clone forever dependent on the
    >continued presence of the "parent". But after booting the clone
    >for the first time with the "parent" system absent, the clone will
    >become an independent "adult", and it can thereafter be booted
    >with the "parent" present and visible to it, and it will see the
    >"parent" as just another "Local Disk" (i.e. partition) with an access-
    >ible file structure. Of course, if the clone will only be used if the
    >"parent" system's HD dies, this problem never arises.
    >
    >*TimDaniels*
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    <rfdjr1@optonline.net> wrote:
    >
    >><rfdjr@aol.com> wrote:
    >>> Posted for a friend who's having trouble making a copy
    >>> of a hard drive as backup.
    >>>
    >>> I've been using Acronis True Image 8, and trying to copy
    >>> my primary boot partition to a much larger hard drive.
    >>> Using the Disk Clone tool I get a perfect copy except for
    >>> one problem. When I boot on the cloned drive, windows XP
    >>> doesn't see the other two hard drives in the system. If I
    >>> install the original boot drive back, and click on My Computer,
    >>> everything is fine. Any suggestions?
    >>
    >>
    >> This may or may not have anything to do with your problem,
    >>but proper procedure in making a clone (that may be used with
    >>the original "parent" system visible to it at some time) is to
    >>remove the "parent" before the FIRST bootup of the clone. If
    >>this isn't done, the clone sets links to various files in the "parent"
    >>system, thus making the clone forever dependent on the
    >>continued presence of the "parent". But after booting the clone
    >>for the first time with the "parent" system absent, the clone will
    >>become an independent "adult", and it can thereafter be booted
    >>with the "parent" present and visible to it, and it will see the
    >>"parent" as just another "Local Disk" (i.e. partition) with an access-
    >>ible file structure. Of course, if the clone will only be used if the
    >>"parent" system's HD dies, this problem never arises.
    >>
    >>*TimDaniels*

    > Not following you on the parent/adult connection, or how to "remove the parent"
    > before the first boot up of the clone. Is the parent system the hardware the
    > clone is being made on i.e. the motherboard, RAM, etc? If so, how can it be
    > removed?? Thanks.


    The "parent" system is the original WinXP that is being copied
    from the source HD to a 2nd (i.e. destination) HD which will contain
    the clone WinXP system. When the clone is booted for the first time,
    it looks around to see its environment, and upon seeing and
    recognizing its "parent" WinXP system, it sets some of its pointers
    to files in the "parent" instead of within its own file structure. I've
    seen and heard of this occurring for random .doc files in My Documents,
    resulting in some files residing and being updated in the clone when the
    clone is running, and some residing and being updated in the "parent's"
    file structure when the clone is running. This confusion of files does
    not occur when the "parent" is running - only when the clone is running.
    After a while, what you get in the clone is only a partial collection of
    the updated files - some are in the "parent" file structure and some
    are in the clone's file structure, and the clone will not contain some
    of the files that you thought you had updated in the clone's file structure.
    If you then take the "parent" away, the clone will seem OK until you
    try to access those files.

    The solution is to physically remove the source HD, which contains
    the "parent" system, when booting the clone for the first time. You can
    do this by physically removing the "parent" system's HD from the PC,
    or you can just unplug it, or you can just cut the power to the HD with
    a toggle switch (like I do). With the "parent" thus invisible to the clone,
    the clone can be booted. If there are only 2 HDs to begin with, the
    clone's HD will move up in the BIOS's hard drive boot order and be at
    the head of the boot order list (i.e. take relative position 0), and the
    clone's HD will get control from the BIOS. If the clone's partition is
    marked "active", it will get control from the MBR at boot up, and the
    clone's boot menu (contained in its boot.ini file) will be displayed.
    Since the clone has taken the "parent's" relative position 0, "rdisk(0)"
    in the boot menu will refer to it, and all will proceed as if it were
    happening for the "parent". If the clone will not be the only partition
    on the destination HD, the copy utility should be told to mark the clone's
    partition "active". There should also be an entry in its boot.ini file to
    refer to the correct partition no. where the clone will reside. This can
    be done in two ways:

    1) You can make an extra entry in the boot.ini file of the "parent"
    before the cloning operation that points to the destination
    partition. The boot.ini file will then contain an entry in the boot
    menu that points to the clone's partition, and you can select
    that entry when the clone is booted.

    2) You can boot the PARENT system after the cloning operation
    and go into the clone's file structure and edit the CLONE'S
    boot.ini file while the PARENT is running. The clone will not
    yet have been booted as a system, and no improper links
    will be set by booting the "parent".

    In editing the boot menu in the clone's boot.ini file, keep in
    mind that "rdisk" refers to the relative position of the HD in the
    BIOS's hard drive boot order. If there are more than 2 HDs,
    the boot order must be checked in the BIOS whenever a HD is
    removed or added to be sure that the correct HD is at the head
    of the list, i.e. at relative position 0, known as "rdisk(0)" in the
    boot menu. The partition is designated in the boot menu by the
    "parition(x)" term, where "x" is the no. of the partition starting
    with 1. Take a look at the boot.ini file at position C:\boot.ini,
    and you'll see what I'm talking about. By selecting from these
    entries in the boot menu at boot time, the boot loader (ntldr)
    will pass control to the desired partition's boot sector, and the
    partition's OS will be loaded.

    Notice that the boot.ini and ntldr don't have to reside on
    the same partition as the booted system. Once the clone
    has booted for the first time and has settled down as an adult,
    EITHER the "parent" OR the clone HD can be put at the head
    of the BIOS's boot order and thus get control. The "active"
    parition on that HD then receives control and the ntldr there
    displays the entries in its boot.ini file. You then select the
    proper entry from the menu that is displayed, and ntldr then
    loads the system from the partition that you've selected. The
    partition you select, though, needn't be on the same partition
    as the ntldr/boot.ini or even on the same HD.

    To make this simpler, I just have a generic boot.ini file that
    lists 4 partitions on 3 HDs. This gets copied whenever I make
    a clone. Then, knowing the position of whichever clone I want
    to boot up, I just select that position from whatever menu I find
    myself looking at - no prior editing necessary.

    How do you know which clone you're looking at when it has
    booted? You can put a file with a distinctive name on the desktop
    of each clone which tells its creation date and the disk/partition it's
    in. If you want to see which partition's boot loader is running, you
    can put that same info in the boot.ini file of each clone (i.e. between
    the double quotes of each entry) and it will be displayed in the
    boot menu.

    *TimDaniels*
    ..
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    <rfdjr1@optonline.net> wrote:
    > Is the parent system the hardware the clone is being
    > made on i.e. the motherboard, RAM, etc?

    No, I've been loosely referring to the operating system
    as "the system". I guess "WinXP o.s." would have been
    better.

    *TimDaniels*
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    <rfdjr1@optonline.net> wrote:
    > I'm going to forward this all to my buddy who's the one having the problem.

    If your buddy is using Ghost 9.0 (previously Drive Image 7), remind
    him to check the options to copy the MBR to the second HD (if one is
    not already on it) and to mark the clone's partition "active". In Casper XP,
    the "active" flag is set automatically. BTW, for simple backup operations
    such a cloning, Casper XP is well-suited and it's also cheaper than most
    of the other utilities. You can even download a free trial version at
    http://www.fssdev.com/products/casperxp/ . I've been using the free version
    for a few weeks, now, and it runs fine.

    *TimDaniels*
  7. I am posting a response even though this is an old issue. I had an issue today copying a Windows XP partition from an old hard disk to a new one. When I created the partition for the first time (using Partition Magic 8.0) I inadvertently booted from the "new" partition when Partition Magic did its reboot when finishing. When I removed the original drive the new drive booted up to the XP logo screen and then just hung there.

    After reading Tim Daniel's post about the new "child" drive being dependent on the "parent" drive, I decided to redo the partition copy and this time making sure that the new drive did not boot on its own until the original drive was removed. Wala! The new drive boot perfectly!

    So Tim's theory is exactly right.

    Thanks Tim!
Ask a new question

Read More

Partition Hard Drives Windows XP