Acronis True Image works like magic!

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

I read a post here a few months ago that someone used
Acronis True Image to "clone" their C drive to a larger
capacity drive with success. Well after several months
of trying to upgrade my C drive to a larger capacity with
the tools that XP Home provides, I was not making any
progress and went out and bought Acronis True Image
version 8. Installed the software, swapped in my new
drive to copy/clone to, and maybe within an hour or so
I was booting up my PC with an 80 GB C drive (from
6 GB). It was magic! I couldn't believe it! No errors
during boot. User friendly interface. Quite reasonable
in price. Based on my experience I would recommend
Acronis True Image for backup/restore software.

-- Derek Scuteri
12 answers Last reply
More about acronis true image works magic
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    dean wrote:
    > How many CDs are need to 'image' or 'clone' an 80 GB HD? (As the question
    > probably reveals I've never 'cloned' before).

    Why would you want to clone an 80 GB drive to CDs? At worst, you could
    use DVDs, but more likely you would go to another drive, internal or
    external. Or, depending on your objectives and if you are imaging just
    some partition(s) rather than the entire drive, you could go to another
    partition on the same drive.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    How many CDs are need to 'image' or 'clone' an 80 GB HD? (As the question
    probably reveals I've never 'cloned' before).
    Thanks,
    Dean


    "Derek Scuteri" <dscuteri@msn.com> escreveu na mensagem
    news:uiawpEApFHA.3244@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >I read a post here a few months ago that someone used
    > Acronis True Image to "clone" their C drive to a larger
    > capacity drive with success. Well after several months
    > of trying to upgrade my C drive to a larger capacity with
    > the tools that XP Home provides, I was not making any
    > progress and went out and bought Acronis True Image
    > version 8. Installed the software, swapped in my new
    > drive to copy/clone to, and maybe within an hour or so
    > I was booting up my PC with an 80 GB C drive (from
    > 6 GB). It was magic! I couldn't believe it! No errors
    > during boot. User friendly interface. Quite reasonable
    > in price. Based on my experience I would recommend
    > Acronis True Image for backup/restore software.
    >
    > -- Derek Scuteri
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    I cloned disk (6 GB) to disk (80 GB).

    -- Derek Scuteri

    "dean" <deanhansen@NO-SPAM.uol.com.br> wrote in message
    news:OAjVRNApFHA.3068@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > How many CDs are need to 'image' or 'clone' an 80 GB HD? (As the question
    > probably reveals I've never 'cloned' before).
    > Thanks,
    > Dean
    >
    >
    >
    > "Derek Scuteri" <dscuteri@msn.com> escreveu na mensagem
    > news:uiawpEApFHA.3244@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >>I read a post here a few months ago that someone used
    >> Acronis True Image to "clone" their C drive to a larger
    >> capacity drive with success. Well after several months
    >> of trying to upgrade my C drive to a larger capacity with
    >> the tools that XP Home provides, I was not making any
    >> progress and went out and bought Acronis True Image
    >> version 8. Installed the software, swapped in my new
    >> drive to copy/clone to, and maybe within an hour or so
    >> I was booting up my PC with an 80 GB C drive (from
    >> 6 GB). It was magic! I couldn't believe it! No errors
    >> during boot. User friendly interface. Quite reasonable
    >> in price. Based on my experience I would recommend
    >> Acronis True Image for backup/restore software.
    >>
    >> -- Derek Scuteri
    >>
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    In news:uiawpEApFHA.3244@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    Derek Scuteri <dscuteri@msn.com> had this to say:

    My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

    > I read a post here a few months ago that someone used
    > Acronis True Image to "clone" their C drive to a larger
    > capacity drive with success. Well after several months
    > of trying to upgrade my C drive to a larger capacity with
    > the tools that XP Home provides, I was not making any
    > progress and went out and bought Acronis True Image
    > version 8. Installed the software, swapped in my new
    > drive to copy/clone to, and maybe within an hour or so
    > I was booting up my PC with an 80 GB C drive (from
    > 6 GB). It was magic! I couldn't believe it! No errors
    > during boot. User friendly interface. Quite reasonable
    > in price. Based on my experience I would recommend
    > Acronis True Image for backup/restore software.
    >
    > -- Derek Scuteri

    I use it on a daily basis to make incremintal backups. It is then used
    weekly to make a full HDD backup to a clone, and monthly to make a backup
    spanning multiple DVDs.

    It replaced my Norton Ghost 2k3 which was their last good version in my
    opinion. I've also got a copy of Image for Windows which seems to work well.

    Galen
    --

    "Chance has put in our way a most singular and whimsical problem, and
    its solution is its own reward."

    Sherlock Holmes
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    "Derek Scuteri" wrote:
    >I read a post here a few months ago that someone used
    > Acronis True Image to "clone" their C drive to a larger
    > capacity drive with success. Well after several months
    > of trying to upgrade my C drive to a larger capacity with
    > the tools that XP Home provides, I was not making any
    > progress and went out and bought Acronis True Image
    > version 8. Installed the software, swapped in my new
    > drive to copy/clone to, and maybe within an hour or so
    > I was booting up my PC with an 80 GB C drive (from
    > 6 GB). It was magic! I couldn't believe it! No errors
    > during boot. User friendly interface. Quite reasonable
    > in price. Based on my experience I would recommend
    > Acronis True Image for backup/restore software.


    For pure cloning as you did (i.e. not an incremental
    backup nor creation of an "image" file), you could
    have done it for free with the free trial version of
    Casper XP available form Future Systems Solutions
    at: http://www.fssdev.com/products/casperxp/ .
    Casper XP (like Ghost) can take a single partition
    from an HD containing several partitions and clone
    it to an HD that already contains several partitions.
    This allows the storage of several clones on a single
    backup HD. True Image, on the other hand, clones
    the ENTIRE source HD to the ENTIRETY of the
    destination HD - fine if you're just upgrading to a
    larger HD, but lousy for storage of more than one
    bootable image (i.e. a clone) on a single HD. And
    unlike Ghost 9.0, Casper XP doesn't use Microsoft's
    .NET Framework.

    *TimDaniels*
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    I fully agree with you, Derek Scuteri. It's excellent program in fact!
    > For pure cloning as you did (i.e. not an incremental
    > backup nor creation of an "image" file), you could
    > have done it for free with the free trial version of
    > Casper XP available form Future Systems Solutions
    > at: http://www.fssdev.com/products/casperxp/ .
    > Casper XP (like Ghost) can take a single partition
    > from an HD containing several partitions and clone
    > it to an HD that already contains several partitions.
    > This allows the storage of several clones on a single
    > backup HD. True Image, on the other hand, clones
    > the ENTIRE source HD to the ENTIRETY of the
    > destination HD - fine if you're just upgrading to a
    > larger HD, but lousy for storage of more than one
    > bootable image (i.e. a clone) on a single HD. And
    > unlike Ghost 9.0, Casper XP doesn't use Microsoft's
    > .NET Framework.
    You are wrong. As I understood, you have mixed up "Backup/Restore
    partition (disk)" and "transferring file system to a new disk". This
    program can do both 1st and 2nd things.
    Study more about acronis backup software before making such posts with
    misinformation! ;-)
    You may do it here:
    http://us1.download.acronis.com/pdf/trueimage8.0_ug.en.pdf
    Read pages 19-38.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    I fully agree with you, Derek Scuteri. It's excellent program in fact!
    > For pure cloning as you did (i.e. not an incremental
    > backup nor creation of an "image" file), you could
    > have done it for free with the free trial version of
    > Casper XP available form Future Systems Solutions
    > at: http://www.fssdev.com/products/casperxp/ .
    > Casper XP (like Ghost) can take a single partition
    > from an HD containing several partitions and clone
    > it to an HD that already contains several partitions.
    > This allows the storage of several clones on a single
    > backup HD. True Image, on the other hand, clones
    > the ENTIRE source HD to the ENTIRETY of the
    > destination HD - fine if you're just upgrading to a
    > larger HD, but lousy for storage of more than one
    > bootable image (i.e. a clone) on a single HD. And
    > unlike Ghost 9.0, Casper XP doesn't use Microsoft's
    > .NET Framework.


    You are wrong, Timothy Daniels. As I understood, you have mixed up
    "Backup/Restore
    partition (disk)" and "transferring file system to a new disk". This
    program can do both 1st and 2nd things.
    Study more about acronis backup software before making such posts with
    misinformation! ;-)
    You may do it here:
    http://us1.download.acronis.com/pdf/trueimage8.0_ug.en.pdf
    Read pages 19-38.
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    "Kinoby" <dlyagugla@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >True Image, on the other hand, clones
    >> the ENTIRE source HD to the ENTIRETY of the
    >> destination HD - fine if you're just upgrading to a
    >> larger HD, but lousy for storage of more than one
    >> bootable image (i.e. a clone) on a single HD.

    Not at all true. I do complete 'backups' using True Image every third
    day. I backup these complete backups to an external 250gb USB drive.
    My C drive contains about 11gb of data and TrueImage creates a file
    around 7.5gb on the external drive for each full backup. I can, and
    have, restored complete images from these backups and when done, the
    new images boots perfectly. Also, If I want just to grab a few files
    from a previous backup, I can mount a backup image as drive letter on
    free space on my main harddrive and use Windows Explorer to browse or
    copy files from the backup image. I don't even know what new features
    are available with TrueImage version 8 as I am using, and am very
    satisfied with, version 7.
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    "Kinoby" <dlyagugla@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >

    Kinoby, oops, I'm sorry. I meant to post my previous reply to Timothy
    but old age caught up to me and I posted it under your name. :(
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    "Zilbandy" wrote:
    >
    >>>True Image, on the other hand, clones
    >>> the ENTIRE source HD to the ENTIRETY of the
    >>> destination HD - fine if you're just upgrading to a
    >>> larger HD, but lousy for storage of more than one
    >>> bootable image (i.e. a clone) on a single HD.
    >
    > Not at all true. I do complete 'backups' using True Image
    > every third day. I backup these complete backups to an
    > external 250gb USB drive. My C drive contains about
    > 11gb of data and TrueImage creates a file around 7.5gb
    > on the external drive for each full backup. I can, and have,
    > restored complete images from these backups and when
    > done, the new images boots perfectly...


    What you are doing is making an IMAGE FILE which
    is stored on external media just like any other file.
    Then you are taking the contents of such a file and
    "restoring" it (which may involve expanding it if it was
    compressed while making the image file) to a HD.

    I was talking about making a CLONE - an exact byte-
    for-byte copy of the OS's partition onto another HD,
    including the partition's boot sector, such that it can
    be booted directly from where it resides on the
    backup HD with no "restoration" step necessary.

    In short, a clone can be booted directly, an image file
    must first be "restored". You've been making image
    files, not clones.

    *TimDaniels*
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    "Kinoby" wrote:
    > Timothy Daniels wrote:
    >> For pure cloning as you did (i.e. not an incremental
    >> backup nor creation of an "image" file), you could
    >> have done it for free with the free trial version of
    >> Casper XP available form Future Systems Solutions
    >> at: http://www.fssdev.com/products/casperxp/ .
    >> Casper XP (like Ghost) can take a single partition
    >> from an HD containing several partitions and clone
    >> it to an HD that already contains several partitions.
    >> This allows the storage of several clones on a single
    >> backup HD. True Image, on the other hand, clones
    >> the ENTIRE source HD to the ENTIRETY of the
    >> destination HD - fine if you're just upgrading to a
    >> larger HD, but lousy for storage of more than one
    >> bootable image (i.e. a clone) on a single HD. And
    >> unlike Ghost 9.0, Casper XP doesn't use Microsoft's
    >> .NET Framework.
    >
    > You are wrong. As I understood, you have mixed up
    > "Backup/Restore partition (disk)" and "transferring
    > file system to a new disk". This program can do both
    > 1st and 2nd things. Study more about acronis backup
    > software before making such posts with misinformation! ;-)
    > You may do it here:
    > http://us1.download.acronis.com/pdf/trueimage8.0_ug.en.pdf
    > Read pages 19-38.


    You haven't read that manual carefully. Pages 19-37 pertain
    to image files. Starting on page 38 is the section on
    transferring a system, i.e. making clones. You will see that
    a cloning must be of an entire HD's contents to the entirety
    of another HD. You cannot select which partition to clone,
    and you cannot designate its destination on the 2nd HD.
    You must transfer ALL of it. This is great for moving up to a
    larger HD, but it severely limits you if you want to put multiple
    clones, i.e. BOOTABLE copies of your OS, on the 2nd HD.
    To do that using True Image, you must make an image file
    and store it somewhere. Then you must "restore" it to the
    destination HD. In that case, True Image is True Pain.

    On the other hand, Casper XP will let you select just the OS
    partition (or a particular OS partition among many) from one
    HD and clone it as, say, the 3rd partition on a HD that already
    contains a couple other clones. The result will be 3 clones on
    the 2nd HD, each of them immediately and directly bootable
    without any "restoration" step. A few other utilities allow this,
    too, by the way. Ghost 9.0 is one of them.

    *TimDaniels*
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    I'm sure in time Acronis will also add newer features
    to True Image that will allow more flexability in its use.

    -- Derek Scuteri

    "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message
    news:wvOdnUhAe_3JJpveRVn-qw@comcast.com...
    >
    > "Kinoby" wrote:
    >> Timothy Daniels wrote:
    >>> For pure cloning as you did (i.e. not an incremental
    >>> backup nor creation of an "image" file), you could
    >>> have done it for free with the free trial version of
    >>> Casper XP available form Future Systems Solutions
    >>> at: http://www.fssdev.com/products/casperxp/ .
    >>> Casper XP (like Ghost) can take a single partition
    >>> from an HD containing several partitions and clone
    >>> it to an HD that already contains several partitions.
    >>> This allows the storage of several clones on a single
    >>> backup HD. True Image, on the other hand, clones
    >>> the ENTIRE source HD to the ENTIRETY of the
    >>> destination HD - fine if you're just upgrading to a
    >>> larger HD, but lousy for storage of more than one
    >>> bootable image (i.e. a clone) on a single HD. And
    >>> unlike Ghost 9.0, Casper XP doesn't use Microsoft's
    >>> .NET Framework.
    >>
    >> You are wrong. As I understood, you have mixed up
    >> "Backup/Restore partition (disk)" and "transferring
    >> file system to a new disk". This program can do both
    >> 1st and 2nd things. Study more about acronis backup
    >> software before making such posts with misinformation! ;-)
    >> You may do it here:
    >> http://us1.download.acronis.com/pdf/trueimage8.0_ug.en.pdf
    >> Read pages 19-38.
    >
    >
    > You haven't read that manual carefully. Pages 19-37 pertain
    > to image files. Starting on page 38 is the section on
    > transferring a system, i.e. making clones. You will see that
    > a cloning must be of an entire HD's contents to the entirety
    > of another HD. You cannot select which partition to clone,
    > and you cannot designate its destination on the 2nd HD.
    > You must transfer ALL of it. This is great for moving up to a
    > larger HD, but it severely limits you if you want to put multiple
    > clones, i.e. BOOTABLE copies of your OS, on the 2nd HD.
    > To do that using True Image, you must make an image file
    > and store it somewhere. Then you must "restore" it to the
    > destination HD. In that case, True Image is True Pain.
    >
    > On the other hand, Casper XP will let you select just the OS
    > partition (or a particular OS partition among many) from one
    > HD and clone it as, say, the 3rd partition on a HD that already
    > contains a couple other clones. The result will be 3 clones on
    > the 2nd HD, each of them immediately and directly bootable
    > without any "restoration" step. A few other utilities allow this,
    > too, by the way. Ghost 9.0 is one of them.
    >
    > *TimDaniels*
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