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UPS with notebook.

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June 11, 2005 11:05:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I have installed a UPS mainly for my desktop but as there were spare sockets
I connected my M60 as well (all to backup and surge protection).

When I test the UPS the M60 goes on to its own battery. Is this the norm for
this set up and are the electronics in the M60 just that bit quicker than
the UPS at recognising a power out.

dj

More about : ups notebook

Anonymous
June 11, 2005 12:33:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I am willing to guess that if it stays on battery you will find that
some outlets on the UPS are for surge protection only and do not
provide UPS capability.

Wayne

Ted wrote:

> I have installed a UPS mainly for my desktop but as there were spare
> sockets I connected my M60 as well (all to backup and surge
> protection).
>
> When I test the UPS the M60 goes on to its own battery. Is this the
> norm for this set up and are the electronics in the M60 just that bit
> quicker than the UPS at recognising a power out.
>
> dj
June 11, 2005 6:21:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"wayne" <nope@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:TuCdnYGj7eeqdTffRVn-qg@comcast.com...
>I am willing to guess that if it stays on battery you will find that
> some outlets on the UPS are for surge protection only and do not
> provide UPS capability.
>
> Wayne
>
> Ted wrote:
>
>> I have installed a UPS mainly for my desktop but as there were spare
>> sockets I connected my M60 as well (all to backup and surge
>> protection).
>>
>> When I test the UPS the M60 goes on to its own battery. Is this the
>> norm for this set up and are the electronics in the M60 just that bit
>> quicker than the UPS at recognising a power out.
>>
>> dj

3 are ups + surge, 1 is surge only. The Notebook is connected to a ups +
surge.

dj
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Anonymous
June 11, 2005 8:25:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Ted wrote:
> I have installed a UPS mainly for my desktop but as there were spare sockets
> I connected my M60 as well (all to backup and surge protection).
>
> When I test the UPS the M60 goes on to its own battery. Is this the norm for
> this set up and are the electronics in the M60 just that bit quicker than
> the UPS at recognising a power out.
>
> dj
>
>
It's possible that when the UPS is switched into backup mode the voltage
& current provided differes slightly albeit sufficiently enough for the
notebook to think it will do better running off the battery. If you're
really brave, and have a multimeter handy, I know one way to find out...
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 10:57:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Appreciate why a laptop drops back onto its own battery.
Computer grade UPS means battery backup mode output is 'dirty'
electricity. 'Dirty' enough to even damage some small
electric motors. But computers are so resilient. That
'dirty' electricity is not harmful to computers. Computers
already contain internal protection that makes 'computer
grade' UPS voltage spikes irrelevant.

The laptop sees that 'dirty' electricity as reason to switch
to battery backup. How 'dirty'? This 120 volt UPS outputs
two 200 volt square waves with a spike as much as 270 volts
between those square waves. Again, why is a computer not
harmed? Because computers already contain any internal
protection that is effective at the computer.

Why does the UPS manufacturer not discuss this? They do;
just not directly. Better for them to not be too obvious;
best not provide numbers. However numbers even demonstrate
why UPS manufacturers recommend no power strip protector on a
UPS output. UPS could output repetitive spikes that would
even degrade plug-in protectors. In some cases, hardware
damage even resulted from spiked electricity during battery
backup mode.

Again, spikes that are irrelevant to resilient computer
hardware. But spikes that cause a laptop to decide
electricity is insufficient. Laptop then switches to internal
battery.

Ted wrote:
> I'll just plug it into the surge protection only socket then.
!