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Geforce 2 Ti problem

Tags:
  • Graphics Cards
  • Geforce
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 28, 2001 7:42:36 AM

I recently bought a PNY Geforce 2 Ti card and have been having a problem with it. Whenever I run any 3d applications the screen freezes within a minute or two (sometimes in a matter of seconds) and I am forced to restart my computer. I am running on an Abit KT7A-RAID motherboard which uses the VIA KT133 chipset. From other posts I know that there have been problems with getting geforce 2 cards to run on motherboards with the VIA chipsets. I tried all of the things that people had suggested (having the latest VIA drivers, checking for IRQ conflicts, reinstalling windows, etc..) but nothing worked. Finally I decided to underclock the Ti's core from it's normal 250 mhz to 225 mhz(I left the memory clock at 400mhz). As soon as I did this the system freezes stopped completely. So I guess my question is, what is wrong with this thing? Do I just have a faulty card or could it be something else? It works great at 225 mhz but I don't think that I should be forced to underclock it to make it work.
My system is as follows:
AMD Athlon 1000
Abit KT7A-RAID Motherboard
256 megs of PC-133 no name RAM
300w power supply

I would appreciate any responses. I'm trying to decide whether or not to trade this one in for a new one or go with a different card altogether

More about : geforce problem

October 28, 2001 1:38:40 PM

Either your videocard is overheating or your power supply is inadequate. The latter is more likely.

When you underclock the video card it consumes less power and generates less heat.

Before you spend money on a new power supply. Return the video card to stock clock. Leave the case open and use a room fan to direct large amounts of air into it. If your system becomes stable then your problem was heat. If this is true then you may need more or more powerful case fans. Make sure you don't have a PCI card adjacent to your video card. Leave a gap.

If the above test fails you can test if the power supply is inadequate by reducing the load on it. Disconnect unneeded drives. Take out PCI cards like a sound card, modem, and/or NIC. If you stay with the open case and room fan you can also disconnect the case fans (for testing only). If this works then your power supply was probably the problem. Although, removing and disconnecting components may have eliminated system conflicts. However this test will lead you in the right direction.

I think your problem is your power supply, if I were to guess.


<b>We are all beta testers!</b>
October 28, 2001 1:54:30 PM

I'd think it was heat, but do teh test, to see what it is.

U got a problem?! Then dial 1800-328-7448!
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