Keeping neighbors at bay

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I'm sure this is an easy question, I just couldn't find an answer in
here. How do you keep your neighbor from using your printer,
internet, etc? I know about WEP and changing passwords, etc...but is
there like a whitelist of approved MAC addresses or something that I
can set up to only allow on the network? Is my only option changing
passwords and checking a WEP box? Also, should I just get a Microsoft
router since they are cheap? Does G provide that much better range
for the money? Are 2.4 phones a big interference issue? Thanks
16 answers Last reply
More about keeping neighbors
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Do you want much better range?
    How big is your house anyway?
    Do you want more neighbors or fewer neighbors to try to hack in?
    2.4 phones can be an issue. So was my 900 mhz phone.
    G is better security, and faster
    Yes you can set up MAC addresses, but that too can be hacked.
    I think you should let your neighbor use your printer. If you dont like that
    idea, there are ways to attach a footer message on every page that says what
    an ass he is! That will discourage him!


    "Scott" <scott4508@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:7e0af77f.0405261722.10b07152@posting.google.com...
    > I'm sure this is an easy question, I just couldn't find an answer in
    > here. How do you keep your neighbor from using your printer,
    > internet, etc? I know about WEP and changing passwords, etc...but is
    > there like a whitelist of approved MAC addresses or something that I
    > can set up to only allow on the network? Is my only option changing
    > passwords and checking a WEP box? Also, should I just get a Microsoft
    > router since they are cheap? Does G provide that much better range
    > for the money? Are 2.4 phones a big interference issue? Thanks
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    MAC filtering is easy. You basically enter the MAC addresses of your
    wireless devices into your router's firmware via its web interface. Each
    wireless device you have has the MAC address printed on the back or bottom
    of the unit. Set the router to accept connections from the devices
    (addresses) you've entered and deny connections from those that do not.
    Unless your neighbors are hard core hackers, MAC filtering should easily
    keep them out.

    I've got the MN-700 "G" Microsoft router and really like it. Super easy to
    configure, has great range, and never gives me problems. You can get one for
    under $40 from various places on the net. Some Office Depot stores might
    still have some in stock on clearance for $37.

    "Scott" <scott4508@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:7e0af77f.0405261722.10b07152@posting.google.com...
    > I'm sure this is an easy question, I just couldn't find an answer in
    > here. How do you keep your neighbor from using your printer,
    > internet, etc? I know about WEP and changing passwords, etc...but is
    > there like a whitelist of approved MAC addresses or something that I
    > can set up to only allow on the network? Is my only option changing
    > passwords and checking a WEP box? Also, should I just get a Microsoft
    > router since they are cheap? Does G provide that much better range
    > for the money? Are 2.4 phones a big interference issue? Thanks
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    scott4508@hotmail.com (Scott) wrote in news:7e0af77f.0405261722.10b07152
    @posting.google.com:

    > but is
    > there like a whitelist of approved MAC addresses or something that I
    > can set up to only allow on the network?

    Yes, you can setup a MAC filter on some APs.

    Best is to use a combination of:

    WPA security
    MAC Filter
    Windows Security

    WPA or WEP encrpytion would delter all but the most hardcore hackers.
    --
    Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
    Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    someone forgot to add disabling SSID broadcast.

    MAC Filter
    WEP (256 bit if possible) or WPA
    Disabling SSID Broadcast
    Not using "default" or "linksys" as your SSID

    Yes I know that each of these things are bypassable by someone who has
    enough time, but by using a combination of things you can get it as secure
    as possible.

    If your network is THAT important, run ethernet and don't use wireless


    On Wed, 26 May 2004 20:38:07 -0600, Harold Starr wrote:

    > Do you want much better range?
    > How big is your house anyway?
    > Do you want more neighbors or fewer neighbors to try to hack in? 2.4
    > phones can be an issue. So was my 900 mhz phone. G is better security, and
    > faster
    > Yes you can set up MAC addresses, but that too can be hacked. I think you
    > should let your neighbor use your printer. If you dont like that idea,
    > there are ways to attach a footer message on every page that says what an
    > ass he is! That will discourage him!
    >
    >
    >
    > "Scott" <scott4508@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:7e0af77f.0405261722.10b07152@posting.google.com...
    >> I'm sure this is an easy question, I just couldn't find an answer in
    >> here. How do you keep your neighbor from using your printer, internet,
    >> etc? I know about WEP and changing passwords, etc...but is there like a
    >> whitelist of approved MAC addresses or something that I can set up to
    >> only allow on the network? Is my only option changing passwords and
    >> checking a WEP box? Also, should I just get a Microsoft router since
    >> they are cheap? Does G provide that much better range for the money?
    >> Are 2.4 phones a big interference issue? Thanks
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    It's not so much that my information is secret and nobody can see
    it...it's just that I naturally have the feeling that I don't want
    anyone looking at stuff that isn't supposed to be doing so. So MAC
    filtering, WEP, etc is all boxes you check or options you enable in
    the software? Sorry, I don't have the router yet.

    Also I heard that range was better on a G than a B. Faster connection
    isn't really needed to me because my internet connection is slower
    anyway. My house is fairly large and there may be several walls for
    the connection to travel to at some times. Are phones only an issue
    when they are in the direct path between you and the router or is the
    whole room the phone is in basically worthless? Thanks

    Jeff <news@mottie.com> wrote in message news:<pan.2004.05.27.05.21.52.668000@mottie.com>...
    > someone forgot to add disabling SSID broadcast.
    >
    > MAC Filter
    > WEP (256 bit if possible) or WPA
    > Disabling SSID Broadcast
    > Not using "default" or "linksys" as your SSID
    >
    > Yes I know that each of these things are bypassable by someone who has
    > enough time, but by using a combination of things you can get it as secure
    > as possible.
    >
    > If your network is THAT important, run ethernet and don't use wireless
    >
    >
    >
    > On Wed, 26 May 2004 20:38:07 -0600, Harold Starr wrote:
    >
    > > Do you want much better range?
    > > How big is your house anyway?
    > > Do you want more neighbors or fewer neighbors to try to hack in? 2.4
    > > phones can be an issue. So was my 900 mhz phone. G is better security, and
    > > faster
    > > Yes you can set up MAC addresses, but that too can be hacked. I think you
    > > should let your neighbor use your printer. If you dont like that idea,
    > > there are ways to attach a footer message on every page that says what an
    > > ass he is! That will discourage him!
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Scott" <scott4508@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:7e0af77f.0405261722.10b07152@posting.google.com...
    > >> I'm sure this is an easy question, I just couldn't find an answer in
    > >> here. How do you keep your neighbor from using your printer, internet,
    > >> etc? I know about WEP and changing passwords, etc...but is there like a
    > >> whitelist of approved MAC addresses or something that I can set up to
    > >> only allow on the network? Is my only option changing passwords and
    > >> checking a WEP box? Also, should I just get a Microsoft router since
    > >> they are cheap? Does G provide that much better range for the money?
    > >> Are 2.4 phones a big interference issue? Thanks
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Lucas Tam" <REMOVEnntp@rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns94F5E98536E43nntprogerscom@140.99.99.130...
    > scott4508@hotmail.com (Scott) wrote in news:7e0af77f.0405261722.10b07152
    > @posting.google.com:
    >
    > > but is
    > > there like a whitelist of approved MAC addresses or something that I
    > > can set up to only allow on the network?
    >
    > Yes, you can setup a MAC filter on some APs.
    >
    > Best is to use a combination of:
    >
    > WPA security
    > MAC Filter
    > Windows Security
    >
    > WPA or WEP encrpytion would delter all but the most hardcore hackers.


    But it is a neighbor who has lots of time to exploit insecure wireless. If
    the OP wants security he may want to rethink using wireless and get a couple
    Ethernet cables.


    > --
    > Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
    > Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    > http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    curious,,,, i havent experimented with disabling ssid
    when ssid is disabled
    if a laptop card ssid is set to ANY
    does it connect ?

    "George" <George@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:qZadndEM5a2yRyjd4p2dnA@adelphia.com...
    >
    > "Lucas Tam" <REMOVEnntp@rogers.com> wrote in message
    > news:Xns94F5E98536E43nntprogerscom@140.99.99.130...
    > > scott4508@hotmail.com (Scott) wrote in news:7e0af77f.0405261722.10b07152
    > > @posting.google.com:
    > >
    > > > but is
    > > > there like a whitelist of approved MAC addresses or something that I
    > > > can set up to only allow on the network?
    > >
    > > Yes, you can setup a MAC filter on some APs.
    > >
    > > Best is to use a combination of:
    > >
    > > WPA security
    > > MAC Filter
    > > Windows Security
    > >
    > > WPA or WEP encrpytion would delter all but the most hardcore hackers.
    >
    >
    > But it is a neighbor who has lots of time to exploit insecure wireless. If
    > the OP wants security he may want to rethink using wireless and get a
    couple
    > Ethernet cables.
    >
    >
    > > --
    > > Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
    > > Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    > > http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Avoiding wireless completely is extreme unless your data is of very high
    value. The OP is right to be concerned about security, though. The issue
    goes beyond sniffing your data or slowing down your Internet connection.
    You need to worry about interlopers storing warez or porn on your computers.
    You need to worry that the bad guys will violate the terms of your ISP
    agreement, either by making you into a reseller of their broadband link, or
    by transferring illegal content. The black hats could use your LAN to stage
    a Denial of Service attack against someone.

    The standard to protect yourself in the eyes of the law is Due Diligence.
    Use reasonable methods to protect your WLAN. WPA (even with PSK) fits the
    bill.

    Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.

    "George" <George@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:qZadndEM5a2yRyjd4p2dnA@adelphia.com...
    >
    > "Lucas Tam" <REMOVEnntp@rogers.com> wrote in message
    > news:Xns94F5E98536E43nntprogerscom@140.99.99.130...
    > > scott4508@hotmail.com (Scott) wrote in news:7e0af77f.0405261722.10b07152
    > > @posting.google.com:
    > >
    > > > but is
    > > > there like a whitelist of approved MAC addresses or something that I
    > > > can set up to only allow on the network?
    > >
    > > Yes, you can setup a MAC filter on some APs.
    > >
    > > Best is to use a combination of:
    > >
    > > WPA security
    > > MAC Filter
    > > Windows Security
    > >
    > > WPA or WEP encrpytion would delter all but the most hardcore hackers.
    >
    >
    > But it is a neighbor who has lots of time to exploit insecure wireless. If
    > the OP wants security he may want to rethink using wireless and get a
    couple
    > Ethernet cables.
    >
    >
    > > --
    > > Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
    > > Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    > > http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "George" <George@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:qZadndEM5a2yRyjd4p2dnA@adelphia.com...
    >
    > "Lucas Tam" <REMOVEnntp@rogers.com> wrote in message
    > news:Xns94F5E98536E43nntprogerscom@140.99.99.130...
    > > scott4508@hotmail.com (Scott) wrote in news:7e0af77f.0405261722.10b07152
    > > @posting.google.com:
    > >
    > > > but is
    > > > there like a whitelist of approved MAC addresses or something that I
    > > > can set up to only allow on the network?
    > >
    > > Yes, you can setup a MAC filter on some APs.
    > >
    > > Best is to use a combination of:
    > >
    > > WPA security
    > > MAC Filter
    > > Windows Security
    > >
    > > WPA or WEP encrpytion would delter all but the most hardcore hackers.
    >
    >
    > But it is a neighbor who has lots of time to exploit insecure wireless. If
    > the OP wants security he may want to rethink using wireless and get a
    couple
    > Ethernet cables.
    >
    >
    > > --
    > > Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
    > > Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    > > http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
    >
    >
    Turn off routers DHCP and use static addressing, use anything other than
    192.168.0.x or 192.168.1.x

    Might make it a little harder for them ?
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On 27 May 2004 05:28:32 -0700, scott4508@hotmail.com (Scott) wrote:

    >It's not so much that my information is secret and nobody can see
    >it...it's just that I naturally have the feeling that I don't want
    >anyone looking at stuff that isn't supposed to be doing so. So MAC
    >filtering, WEP, etc is all boxes you check or options you enable in
    >the software? Sorry, I don't have the router yet.
    >
    >Also I heard that range was better on a G than a B. Faster connection
    >isn't really needed to me because my internet connection is slower
    >anyway. My house is fairly large and there may be several walls for
    >the connection to travel to at some times. Are phones only an issue
    >when they are in the direct path between you and the router or is the
    >whole room the phone is in basically worthless? Thanks
    >
    Phones are an issue all the time not just "in the path".
    Personally my 900mhz phones work fine.
    The other problem with letting your neighbor have access is the RIAA.
    If your neighbor does ANYTHING illegal it will be your door the people
    knock on!! Porn, KIDDIE porn, illegal song downloads, even too much
    usage on your cable.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Taking a moment's reflection, Jeff mused:
    |
    | someone forgot to add disabling SSID broadcast.

    That's widely stated as a security measure, but most manufacturers,
    including Microsoft, state that disabling SSID broadcast is not really
    enhancing security. The theory is that anyone who can crack a WEP key or
    trap your MAC address can simply detect your SSID as well. Also, some cards
    (the Linksys WPC54G under 2000 for example) have trouble associating with
    the AP if the SSID broadcast is disabled.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    gary <pleasenospam@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

    > SSID-disabling and MAC filtering don't add any value. Each can be defeated
    > trivially, with a minimum amount of effort on a hacker's part. It doesn't
    > hurt to use them, but without encryption they just give a false sense of
    > security. I recommend any form of encryption, to address privacy and access
    > issues, combined with a good wifi firewall.

    I would argue that disabling SSID *does* hurt because doing so makes the
    cooperative use of unlicensed radio spectrum more difficult and
    encourages the use of Wi-Fi sniffing software.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Neill Massello" <neillmassello@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:1gehu1k.wao6r1dnfkg0N%neillmassello@earthlink.net...
    > gary <pleasenospam@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
    >
    > > SSID-disabling and MAC filtering don't add any value. Each can be
    defeated
    > > trivially, with a minimum amount of effort on a hacker's part. It
    doesn't
    > > hurt to use them, but without encryption they just give a false sense of
    > > security. I recommend any form of encryption, to address privacy and
    access
    > > issues, combined with a good wifi firewall.
    >
    > I would argue that disabling SSID *does* hurt because doing so makes the
    > cooperative use of unlicensed radio spectrum more difficult and
    > encourages the use of Wi-Fi sniffing software.
    >

    The only functionality it affects is roaming. For the vast majority of home
    networks, this is simply not an issue. I wouldn't advise someone to avoid a
    nonstandard feature merely because it interferes with a standard feature
    they do not - and may not ever - use (although I wish vendors wouldn't offer
    it). I do think people should understand this before they make the choice.
    In any case, it is a relatively useless thing to do.

    I seriously doubt that it encourages the use of sniffing software. "Polite"
    sniffers like Netstumbler will only discover networks that have SSID
    broadcast enabled, but less "polite" sniffers will put the adapter in
    promiscuous mode and monitor all channels for any traffic. Once traffic is
    detected, the instant a client associates with the network, the SSID is
    available. Presence or absence of SSIDs in beacons in no way affects the
    likelihood that your net will be found by these sniffers (or the ability of
    the sniffer to get the SSID).
  14. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 26 May 2004 20:38:07 -0600, "Harold Starr" <dd@sodfa.net> wrote:

    >Do you want much better range?
    >How big is your house anyway?
    >Do you want more neighbors or fewer neighbors to try to hack in?
    >2.4 phones can be an issue. So was my 900 mhz phone.
    >G is better security, and faster
    >Yes you can set up MAC addresses, but that too can be hacked.
    >I think you should let your neighbor use your printer. If you dont like that
    >idea, there are ways to attach a footer message on every page that says what
    >an ass he is! That will discourage him!

    How will that discourage HIM when it will print in YOUR house?

    Duh.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    When he comes over to pick up his printouts, he won't like what he sees!

    "Mark" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
    news:vtmrb01seft36jmqo33nm26jj2lgqormap@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 26 May 2004 20:38:07 -0600, "Harold Starr" <dd@sodfa.net> wrote:
    >
    > >Do you want much better range?
    > >How big is your house anyway?
    > >Do you want more neighbors or fewer neighbors to try to hack in?
    > >2.4 phones can be an issue. So was my 900 mhz phone.
    > >G is better security, and faster
    > >Yes you can set up MAC addresses, but that too can be hacked.
    > >I think you should let your neighbor use your printer. If you dont like
    that
    > >idea, there are ways to attach a footer message on every page that says
    what
    > >an ass he is! That will discourage him!
    >
    > How will that discourage HIM when it will print in YOUR house?
    >
    > Duh.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    In article <YbWdnd6s5-ELySjd4p2dnA@comcast.com>,
    Harold Starr <dd@sodfa.net> wrote:
    > How big is your house anyway?

    My b/g router (USR8054) has a range which extends much past my house; my
    house would have to be truly huge to contain it. (Or have chicken wire in
    the external walls.)

    > 2.4 phones can be an issue. So was my 900 mhz phone.

    OTOH, mine's not, and neither is my microwave oven, so YMMV.

    > G is better security, and faster

    The "faster" bit may not matter for Internet access, as 802.11b is probably
    faster than your connection anyhow. (11 Mbps = 1.373 MBps, and I typically
    get about half that max, with near 100% signal strength. Keep in mind
    802.11 is half-duplex and ethernet is full.) Of course, if you're concerned
    about internal traffic, b/g matters.

    --
    -eben ebQenW1@EtaRmpTabYayU.rIr.OcoPm home.tampabay.rr.com/hactar

    A: Because it looks dumb and is hard to read.
    Q: Why is top-posting wrong? -- from lots42@xxx.com
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