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Goodwill no longer accepts computers..., what's next?

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Anonymous
June 4, 2005 12:03:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

The thrifts around here have been dismal, but I think they are about to
get worse. Goodwill will not accept (and thus not sell) any computer
related items. Is this a new nationwide policy? Say good-bye to Atari
800s, C64's, Adams, etc. They won't take a thing. And Mr. Donator
with his juicy Atari system and 25 carts will be sent packing to a
computer recycling center.

No monitors (goodbye cheap Commodore RGB monitors), no scanners,
nothing.

How much longer until they are told videogame systems have the same
parts as computers, and they no longer accept them??
--
=__ __ __ _ __ _= Andrew Krieg - Professional Newsgroup Junkie =
=_ __ _ __ _ _ __= =
=_ _ _ ___= E-mail: krieg@execpc.SPAM.BLOCK.com.ME.TO =
=_ __ _ __ _ __ _= WWW: http://my.execpc.com/~krieg =
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 12:03:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

It isn't nationwide, at most area wide (one person owns a chain of
them). But that could be iffy also. I know one store says no
computers, but the next one (owned by the same corp/person, does. I
think it could be store policy. If they get a bunch that don't sell,
they probably think they never will. My gripe is when they put $20 on
an item and then it doesn't sell, they dump it. At least some have
learned that after 4 weeks (color rotation) they discount half off.

Corey

On Fri, 03 Jun 2005 20:03:18 -0000, krieg@shell.core.com (Andrew
Krieg) wrote:

>The thrifts around here have been dismal, but I think they are about to
>get worse. Goodwill will not accept (and thus not sell) any computer
>related items. Is this a new nationwide policy? Say good-bye to Atari
>800s, C64's, Adams, etc. They won't take a thing. And Mr. Donator
>with his juicy Atari system and 25 carts will be sent packing to a
>computer recycling center.
>
>No monitors (goodbye cheap Commodore RGB monitors), no scanners,
>nothing.
>
>How much longer until they are told videogame systems have the same
>parts as computers, and they no longer accept them??
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 12:03:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

Eh, it's not an issue here. Also, I'm in good with the people at the
local Goodwill, and if an item has been around for over 14 days, they
knock the price in half for me to get it gone.
Related resources
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 9:40:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

In article <11a1ds67opqhf9e@corp.supernews.com>,
krieg@shell.core.com (Andrew Krieg) wrote:

> The thrifts around here have been dismal, but I think they are about to
> get worse. Goodwill will not accept (and thus not sell) any computer
> related items. Is this a new nationwide policy? Say good-bye to Atari
> 800s, C64's, Adams, etc. They won't take a thing. And Mr. Donator
> with his juicy Atari system and 25 carts will be sent packing to a
> computer recycling center.
>
> No monitors (goodbye cheap Commodore RGB monitors), no scanners,
> nothing.
>
> How much longer until they are told videogame systems have the same
> parts as computers, and they no longer accept them??

In many states, disposal of computer parts are considered hazardous
waste. There is a surcharge to dispose of them legally, and landfill
operators survey incoming trash for violations, with hefty fines going
to violators.

Since Goodwill employees are usually incompetent in how to truly test
computers, and GW won't sell things unless they know it works. So with
them chucking over 90% of donated computers, this would cost them to
much money.

here in StL, supposedly they still accept vid games, but since they
started this knew policy, I haven't found anything classic there.

jt
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 1:15:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

I just bought a older loose CD-Burner for $5 and the door broke when I
opened it and wouldn't load anything. I don't think they are testing
computer parts.

I don't understand the recycle places when they have their big day where
people bring stuff in. Why don't they freecycle everything and people
pillage at least then it won't be going to landfills or whereever. At least
the old electronic junk is going to good use. Our local paper is having one
and in the ad it includes 'electronic games'. That kills me knowing someone
could be tossing out something one of us would treasure.

I bet if I went and wanted to pillage the stuff they wouldn't let me.


"jt august" <starsabre@att.net> wrote in message
news:starsabre-D91C34.00444804062005@netnews.worldnet.att.net...
> In article <11a1ds67opqhf9e@corp.supernews.com>,
> krieg@shell.core.com (Andrew Krieg) wrote:
>
> > The thrifts around here have been dismal, but I think they are about to
> > get worse. Goodwill will not accept (and thus not sell) any computer
> > related items. Is this a new nationwide policy? Say good-bye to Atari
> > 800s, C64's, Adams, etc. They won't take a thing. And Mr. Donator
> > with his juicy Atari system and 25 carts will be sent packing to a
> > computer recycling center.
> >
> > No monitors (goodbye cheap Commodore RGB monitors), no scanners,
> > nothing.
> >
> > How much longer until they are told videogame systems have the same
> > parts as computers, and they no longer accept them??
>
> In many states, disposal of computer parts are considered hazardous
> waste. There is a surcharge to dispose of them legally, and landfill
> operators survey incoming trash for violations, with hefty fines going
> to violators.
>
> Since Goodwill employees are usually incompetent in how to truly test
> computers, and GW won't sell things unless they know it works. So with
> them chucking over 90% of donated computers, this would cost them to
> much money.
>
> here in StL, supposedly they still accept vid games, but since they
> started this knew policy, I haven't found anything classic there.
>
> jt
Anonymous
June 6, 2005 10:03:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

8-Bit Classics wrote:
> It isn't nationwide, at most area wide (one person owns a chain of
> them). But that could be iffy also. I know one store says no
> computers, but the next one (owned by the same corp/person, does. I
> think it could be store policy. If they get a bunch that don't sell,
> they probably think they never will. My gripe is when they put $20 on
> an item and then it doesn't sell, they dump it. At least some have
> learned that after 4 weeks (color rotation) they discount half off.

Most of the Thrifts here in Tampa haven't accepted Computers for years.
Problem is, people were dumping 286s and 386s en masse at the thrifts.
They'd try to sell them, but what's a 30lbs Xerox XT system worth these
days? Well, absolutely nothing. Less than that actually, as it costs
money to legally dispose of them.

So most of the thrifts have a 'no computer and/or monitor' policy. Once
again with 17in CRT monitors running about $75 or so new, there's not
much demand for say a 12 inch beat up CGA monitor from 1988. Even at a
thrift nobody would touch these things.

This doesn't seem to include software though. I donated back a copy of
OS/2 Warp I bought at a thrift 10 years back with no problem last year.
I also see a lot of scanners still, so I guess that's OK. Keyboards
also seem to be acceptable as there's always a bunch of those. I guess
its possible that the odd systems falls through.

But I don't think you have to worry about a 'no cartridge' policy
anytime soon.

= numsix
= http://www.villagebbs.com
Anonymous
June 6, 2005 2:04:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

Anyone here in Austin, TX? There's a Goodwill store there that is
ONLY computers, is it still in operation? (Called Goodwill
Computerworks.) Used to love that place... :)  (Moved to CA)

Rik

On Fri, 03 Jun 2005 18:52:19 -0500, 8-Bit Classics
<corey@8bitclassics.com> wrote:

>It isn't nationwide, at most area wide (one person owns a chain of
>them). But that could be iffy also. I know one store says no
>computers, but the next one (owned by the same corp/person, does. I
>think it could be store policy. If they get a bunch that don't sell,
>they probably think they never will. My gripe is when they put $20 on
>an item and then it doesn't sell, they dump it. At least some have
>learned that after 4 weeks (color rotation) they discount half off.
>
>Corey
>
>On Fri, 03 Jun 2005 20:03:18 -0000, krieg@shell.core.com (Andrew
>Krieg) wrote:
>
>>The thrifts around here have been dismal, but I think they are about to
>>get worse. Goodwill will not accept (and thus not sell) any computer
>>related items. Is this a new nationwide policy? Say good-bye to Atari
>>800s, C64's, Adams, etc. They won't take a thing. And Mr. Donator
>>with his juicy Atari system and 25 carts will be sent packing to a
>>computer recycling center.
>>
>>No monitors (goodbye cheap Commodore RGB monitors), no scanners,
>>nothing.
>>
>>How much longer until they are told videogame systems have the same
>>parts as computers, and they no longer accept them??
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 6:42:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

>On 6 Jun 2005 06:03:20 -0700, "Jack (www.villagebbs.com)" <lupin3@planetjurai.com> wrote:

>Most of the Thrifts here in Tampa haven't accepted Computers for years.
>Problem is, people were dumping 286s and 386s en masse at the thrifts.
>They'd try to sell them, but what's a 30lbs Xerox XT system worth these
>days? Well, absolutely nothing. Less than that actually, as it costs
>money to legally dispose of them.
>
>So most of the thrifts have a 'no computer and/or monitor' policy. Once
>again with 17in CRT monitors running about $75 or so new, there's not
>much demand for say a 12 inch beat up CGA monitor from 1988. Even at a
>thrift nobody would touch these things.

<snip>

I've been lurking for a while, and thought I'd jump in.

I think you've summed up the reasons nicely, your post reminded me of
an article I read somewhere about thrift stores and their rising
disposal costs due to the amount of trash and other worthless items
they receive as donations:

Worn out or stained clothing, including underwear

Broken appliances and other household items

Items that can no longer be sold due to changes in safety regulations
(ie. cribs, car seats, older power tools, etc.)

Items that were in good condition when dropped off, but were dropped
off after hours, and it snowed or rained that night, rendering the
items useless.

Toys, board games and puzzles with missing parts

With having to pay to haul off items that were donated but are trash,
and in some states having to pay hazmat charges to dump computers, I
don't blame some stores for just deciding not to take computers any
more.

Ken
!