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Some pre-questions on expanding network.

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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June 3, 2004 5:14:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

After waiting 4 years DSL is finally available, and I'm supposed to get my
modem in a day or 2, with service starting next week. I have the house wired
with cat5 and been networked for a long time, no problems there. Added a
D-Link 614+ wireless router a year or so ago, and it works great for serving
my notebooks. Well with my DSL modem arriving is supposed to be a 2wire
1000HW model, with built in wireless. I can't seem to find online manual or
instructions. I did see that it's supposed to be "smart" to know when you
plug an Ethernet cable into it, and any hub/switch it knows what to do. I
assume I will figure all this out when it gets here, but what I want to do,
and hence the posting to the wireless group, is take my d-link to an out
building on my property that is also hardwired with cat5 to increase the
wireless range in my yard. How do I set the 2 different wireless hubs to
work together, and how do I make the NIC's connect to on or the other
automatically?

I tried to google, but can't find my answer.

Thanks
Bryan
June 3, 2004 5:40:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Add-on question, what about this special $50 bundle from Compusa.
http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?produc...

It's a G kit, I know about the b/g compability speed issues, just it's the
same price as getting a new laptop card.

Bryan


"Bryan" <BryanW20@gbronline.com> wrote in message
news:10buqginnvl6l4d@corp.supernews.com...
> After waiting 4 years DSL is finally available, and I'm supposed to get my
> modem in a day or 2, with service starting next week. I have the house
wired
> with cat5 and been networked for a long time, no problems there. Added a
> D-Link 614+ wireless router a year or so ago, and it works great for
serving
> my notebooks. Well with my DSL modem arriving is supposed to be a 2wire
> 1000HW model, with built in wireless. I can't seem to find online manual
or
> instructions. I did see that it's supposed to be "smart" to know when you
> plug an Ethernet cable into it, and any hub/switch it knows what to do. I
> assume I will figure all this out when it gets here, but what I want to
do,
> and hence the posting to the wireless group, is take my d-link to an out
> building on my property that is also hardwired with cat5 to increase the
> wireless range in my yard. How do I set the 2 different wireless hubs to
> work together, and how do I make the NIC's connect to on or the other
> automatically?
>
> I tried to google, but can't find my answer.
>
> Thanks
> Bryan
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
June 3, 2004 8:26:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> After waiting 4 years DSL is finally available, and I'm supposed to get my
> modem in a day or 2, with service starting next week. I have the house
wired
> with cat5 and been networked for a long time, no problems there. Added a
> D-Link 614+ wireless router a year or so ago, and it works great for
serving
> my notebooks. Well with my DSL modem arriving is supposed to be a 2wire
> 1000HW model, with built in wireless. I can't seem to find online manual
or
> instructions. I did see that it's supposed to be "smart" to know when you
> plug an Ethernet cable into it, and any hub/switch it knows what to do. I
> assume I will figure all this out when it gets here, but what I want to
do,
> and hence the posting to the wireless group, is take my d-link to an out
> building on my property that is also hardwired with cat5 to increase the
> wireless range in my yard. How do I set the 2 different wireless hubs to
> work together, and how do I make the NIC's connect to on or the other
> automatically?

If you don't want to connect the two routers with a cable, you can get a
wireless Ethernet bridge hooked to a LAN port on the 614+, or an AP that
works in bridgeing mode.

Line of sight, directional antennas.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
June 3, 2004 11:09:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Because there is not yet a standard for the Distribution System, you won't
be able to roam between the 2wire access point and the D-Link access point.
I would set them up with different SSIDs. Regardless of that, if the 2 APs
are within range of each other, then I would set them to different channels.

Your next choice is whether to setup one subnet or two. Another thread in
this NG discussed the security advantage of having separate wired and
wireless subnets. But it sounds like you'd have wireless clients on both
routers. For that reason, I would establish only one subnet.

I looked on the 2wire.com web-site and found info for a model 1000HG, not
1000HW; is that what you have? The 1000HG has only one Ethernet jack.

You should allow the new 2wire router to offer DHCP services and NAT. On
the D-Link router/switch/AP, you won't be using the router function anymore.
That means you won't be using its WAN port. Because the 1000HG has only one
Ethernet jack, you'll need an Ethernet switch to connect your CAT5 cables
that go to your wired clients and to your outbuilding.

For the connection to the outbuilding, if your new Ethernet switch has
auto-crossover just connect a LAN jack on the D-Link to any jack on the
Ethernet switch. Else, if your Ethernet switch has an uplink jack, use that
to connect to the D-Link. Otherwise, you'll need a crossover cable between
the buildings. You can convert your existing cable to a crossover cable by
taking a short crossover cable and joining it to your existing cable with a
CAT5 inline coupler
(http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=...).

Good luck.

Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.

"Bryan" <BryanW20@gbronline.com> wrote in message
news:10buqginnvl6l4d@corp.supernews.com...
> After waiting 4 years DSL is finally available, and I'm supposed to get my
> modem in a day or 2, with service starting next week. I have the house
wired
> with cat5 and been networked for a long time, no problems there. Added a
> D-Link 614+ wireless router a year or so ago, and it works great for
serving
> my notebooks. Well with my DSL modem arriving is supposed to be a 2wire
> 1000HW model, with built in wireless. I can't seem to find online manual
or
> instructions. I did see that it's supposed to be "smart" to know when you
> plug an Ethernet cable into it, and any hub/switch it knows what to do. I
> assume I will figure all this out when it gets here, but what I want to
do,
> and hence the posting to the wireless group, is take my d-link to an out
> building on my property that is also hardwired with cat5 to increase the
> wireless range in my yard. How do I set the 2 different wireless hubs to
> work together, and how do I make the NIC's connect to on or the other
> automatically?
>
> I tried to google, but can't find my answer.
>
> Thanks
> Bryan
>
>
June 3, 2004 11:09:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
news:vHKvc.6274$jI2.602367@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> Because there is not yet a standard for the Distribution System, you won't
> be able to roam between the 2wire access point and the D-Link access
point.
> I would set them up with different SSIDs. Regardless of that, if the 2
APs
> are within range of each other, then I would set them to different
channels.

A little lost here, basicly I'll have 2 seperate wireless networks? For ease
of explanation, call one ssid D-Link call the other 2wire. Each with it's
own channel and wep codes. But because they are both going to be connected
to each other, no matter which hub the card finds, it'll still be able to
surf?


>
> Your next choice is whether to setup one subnet or two. Another thread in
> this NG discussed the security advantage of having separate wired and
> wireless subnets. But it sounds like you'd have wireless clients on both
> routers. For that reason, I would establish only one subnet.
>
> I looked on the 2wire.com web-site and found info for a model 1000HG, not
> 1000HW; is that what you have? The 1000HG has only one Ethernet jack.


Not sure yet, 2wire site, as you said, only lists a 1000HG (G for the .g
standard), but SBC site only lists a 1000HW, I guess the .b standard. I can
hope for a G, supposed to be better, but the B I have now covers most of the
house, and some of my yard, anout 50' out or so.


>
> You should allow the new 2wire router to offer DHCP services and NAT. On
> the D-Link router/switch/AP, you won't be using the router function
anymore.
> That means you won't be using its WAN port. Because the 1000HG has only
one
> Ethernet jack, you'll need an Ethernet switch to connect your CAT5 cables
> that go to your wired clients and to your outbuilding.

I'm currently not using the router function of the D-link as I only have
dialup, I should have mentioned I do have another wired 10/100 switch
(d-link brand also I believe) with uplink port that I all ready use to run
to the wireless D-link. So I figured that part out, and assume when I
connect it to the out building it'll still work the same, just from a
different location.
I'm hoping the Q&A I saw on either 2wire's or SBC's site is correct. It
basicly said plug the ethernet plug into a switch/hub and it'll do the rest
of the work by itself. That sounds to easy, I figure there will be more work
than that, but hope I can just plug it into my hardwired switch, then use
the upling port to sent to my D-link outside.


Thanks for the help. I think I understand, if not set me straight! :-)

Bryan

>
> For the connection to the outbuilding, if your new Ethernet switch has
> auto-crossover just connect a LAN jack on the D-Link to any jack on the
> Ethernet switch. Else, if your Ethernet switch has an uplink jack, use
that
> to connect to the D-Link. Otherwise, you'll need a crossover cable
between
> the buildings. You can convert your existing cable to a crossover cable
by
> taking a short crossover cable and joining it to your existing cable with
a
> CAT5 inline coupler
> (http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=...).
>
> Good luck.
>
> Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
>
> "Bryan" <BryanW20@gbronline.com> wrote in message
> news:10buqginnvl6l4d@corp.supernews.com...
> > After waiting 4 years DSL is finally available, and I'm supposed to get
my
> > modem in a day or 2, with service starting next week. I have the house
> wired
> > with cat5 and been networked for a long time, no problems there. Added a
> > D-Link 614+ wireless router a year or so ago, and it works great for
> serving
> > my notebooks. Well with my DSL modem arriving is supposed to be a 2wire
> > 1000HW model, with built in wireless. I can't seem to find online manual
> or
> > instructions. I did see that it's supposed to be "smart" to know when
you
> > plug an Ethernet cable into it, and any hub/switch it knows what to do.
I
> > assume I will figure all this out when it gets here, but what I want to
> do,
> > and hence the posting to the wireless group, is take my d-link to an out
> > building on my property that is also hardwired with cat5 to increase the
> > wireless range in my yard. How do I set the 2 different wireless hubs to
> > work together, and how do I make the NIC's connect to on or the other
> > automatically?
> >
> > I tried to google, but can't find my answer.
> >
> > Thanks
> > Bryan
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
June 4, 2004 9:32:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Yes. Since the APs are different brands, roaming most likely won't work.
There is no benefit, then, in having a single WLAN. In fact, in the absence
of the APs ability to cooperate (i.e., no common Distribution System), they
would be two separate WLANs even if you gave them the same SSID.

You could give both WLANs the same WEP keys. This wouldn't help the APs,
but it might simplify things for you. One less passphrase to remember or
lose.

If you're using WinXP, I'd put both WLANs on the preferred networks list.
For more primitive, vendor-supplied connection managers, you might have
specify which WLAN you want to connect to. I guess this could be an
argument for using a single SSID.

Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.

"Bryan" <BryanW20@gbronline.com> wrote in message
news:10bv7ukqefd2k35@corp.supernews.com...
>
> "Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
> news:vHKvc.6274$jI2.602367@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> > Because there is not yet a standard for the Distribution System, you
won't
> > be able to roam between the 2wire access point and the D-Link access
> point.
> > I would set them up with different SSIDs. Regardless of that, if the 2
> APs
> > are within range of each other, then I would set them to different
> channels.
>
> A little lost here, basicly I'll have 2 seperate wireless networks? For
ease
> of explanation, call one ssid D-Link call the other 2wire. Each with it's
> own channel and wep codes. But because they are both going to be connected
> to each other, no matter which hub the card finds, it'll still be able to
> surf?
>
>
> >
> > Your next choice is whether to setup one subnet or two. Another thread
in
> > this NG discussed the security advantage of having separate wired and
> > wireless subnets. But it sounds like you'd have wireless clients on
both
> > routers. For that reason, I would establish only one subnet.
> >
> > I looked on the 2wire.com web-site and found info for a model 1000HG,
not
> > 1000HW; is that what you have? The 1000HG has only one Ethernet jack.
>
>
> Not sure yet, 2wire site, as you said, only lists a 1000HG (G for the .g
> standard), but SBC site only lists a 1000HW, I guess the .b standard. I
can
> hope for a G, supposed to be better, but the B I have now covers most of
the
> house, and some of my yard, anout 50' out or so.
>
>
> >
> > You should allow the new 2wire router to offer DHCP services and NAT.
On
> > the D-Link router/switch/AP, you won't be using the router function
> anymore.
> > That means you won't be using its WAN port. Because the 1000HG has only
> one
> > Ethernet jack, you'll need an Ethernet switch to connect your CAT5
cables
> > that go to your wired clients and to your outbuilding.
>
> I'm currently not using the router function of the D-link as I only have
> dialup, I should have mentioned I do have another wired 10/100 switch
> (d-link brand also I believe) with uplink port that I all ready use to run
> to the wireless D-link. So I figured that part out, and assume when I
> connect it to the out building it'll still work the same, just from a
> different location.
> I'm hoping the Q&A I saw on either 2wire's or SBC's site is correct. It
> basicly said plug the ethernet plug into a switch/hub and it'll do the
rest
> of the work by itself. That sounds to easy, I figure there will be more
work
> than that, but hope I can just plug it into my hardwired switch, then use
> the upling port to sent to my D-link outside.
>
>
> Thanks for the help. I think I understand, if not set me straight! :-)
>
> Bryan
>
> >
> > For the connection to the outbuilding, if your new Ethernet switch has
> > auto-crossover just connect a LAN jack on the D-Link to any jack on the
> > Ethernet switch. Else, if your Ethernet switch has an uplink jack, use
> that
> > to connect to the D-Link. Otherwise, you'll need a crossover cable
> between
> > the buildings. You can convert your existing cable to a crossover cable
> by
> > taking a short crossover cable and joining it to your existing cable
with
> a
> > CAT5 inline coupler
> > (http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=...).
> >
> > Good luck.
> >
> > Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
> >
> > "Bryan" <BryanW20@gbronline.com> wrote in message
> > news:10buqginnvl6l4d@corp.supernews.com...
> > > After waiting 4 years DSL is finally available, and I'm supposed to
get
> my
> > > modem in a day or 2, with service starting next week. I have the house
> > wired
> > > with cat5 and been networked for a long time, no problems there. Added
a
> > > D-Link 614+ wireless router a year or so ago, and it works great for
> > serving
> > > my notebooks. Well with my DSL modem arriving is supposed to be a
2wire
> > > 1000HW model, with built in wireless. I can't seem to find online
manual
> > or
> > > instructions. I did see that it's supposed to be "smart" to know when
> you
> > > plug an Ethernet cable into it, and any hub/switch it knows what to
do.
> I
> > > assume I will figure all this out when it gets here, but what I want
to
> > do,
> > > and hence the posting to the wireless group, is take my d-link to an
out
> > > building on my property that is also hardwired with cat5 to increase
the
> > > wireless range in my yard. How do I set the 2 different wireless hubs
to
> > > work together, and how do I make the NIC's connect to on or the other
> > > automatically?
> > >
> > > I tried to google, but can't find my answer.
> > >
> > > Thanks
> > > Bryan
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
>
June 12, 2004 12:15:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Finally got my 2wire, and as advertised it's range is superior to my D-link,
about 50-100% longer. I did relocate my D-Link to my out building, and it's
range is better now, out in the open. I can connect to either hub with my
cards without a problem. But when I connect to the D-link, I can browse the
local intranet, but I can't get to the internet. Any suggestions?

I have turned of the DHCP on the D-link, could it have something to with IP
#'s assigned by the 2wire? Since the laptop would connect to the D-link,
which in turn connect to a switch, which goes to the 2wire, could the 2wire
think this connection is illegal (firewall setting somewhere) and not allow
it on?

Thanks for any help.

Bryan

"Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
news:o m2wc.3349$jD6.2132458@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> Yes. Since the APs are different brands, roaming most likely won't work.
> There is no benefit, then, in having a single WLAN. In fact, in the
absence
> of the APs ability to cooperate (i.e., no common Distribution System),
they
> would be two separate WLANs even if you gave them the same SSID.
>
> You could give both WLANs the same WEP keys. This wouldn't help the APs,
> but it might simplify things for you. One less passphrase to remember or
> lose.
>
> If you're using WinXP, I'd put both WLANs on the preferred networks list.
> For more primitive, vendor-supplied connection managers, you might have
> specify which WLAN you want to connect to. I guess this could be an
> argument for using a single SSID.
>
> Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
>
> "Bryan" <BryanW20@gbronline.com> wrote in message
> news:10bv7ukqefd2k35@corp.supernews.com...
> >
> > "Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
> > news:vHKvc.6274$jI2.602367@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> > > Because there is not yet a standard for the Distribution System, you
> won't
> > > be able to roam between the 2wire access point and the D-Link access
> > point.
> > > I would set them up with different SSIDs. Regardless of that, if the
2
> > APs
> > > are within range of each other, then I would set them to different
> > channels.
> >
> > A little lost here, basicly I'll have 2 seperate wireless networks? For
> ease
> > of explanation, call one ssid D-Link call the other 2wire. Each with
it's
> > own channel and wep codes. But because they are both going to be
connected
> > to each other, no matter which hub the card finds, it'll still be able
to
> > surf?
> >
> >
> > >
> > > Your next choice is whether to setup one subnet or two. Another
thread
> in
> > > this NG discussed the security advantage of having separate wired and
> > > wireless subnets. But it sounds like you'd have wireless clients on
> both
> > > routers. For that reason, I would establish only one subnet.
> > >
> > > I looked on the 2wire.com web-site and found info for a model 1000HG,
> not
> > > 1000HW; is that what you have? The 1000HG has only one Ethernet jack.
> >
> >
> > Not sure yet, 2wire site, as you said, only lists a 1000HG (G for the .g
> > standard), but SBC site only lists a 1000HW, I guess the .b standard. I
> can
> > hope for a G, supposed to be better, but the B I have now covers most of
> the
> > house, and some of my yard, anout 50' out or so.
> >
> >
> > >
> > > You should allow the new 2wire router to offer DHCP services and NAT.
> On
> > > the D-Link router/switch/AP, you won't be using the router function
> > anymore.
> > > That means you won't be using its WAN port. Because the 1000HG has
only
> > one
> > > Ethernet jack, you'll need an Ethernet switch to connect your CAT5
> cables
> > > that go to your wired clients and to your outbuilding.
> >
> > I'm currently not using the router function of the D-link as I only have
> > dialup, I should have mentioned I do have another wired 10/100 switch
> > (d-link brand also I believe) with uplink port that I all ready use to
run
> > to the wireless D-link. So I figured that part out, and assume when I
> > connect it to the out building it'll still work the same, just from a
> > different location.
> > I'm hoping the Q&A I saw on either 2wire's or SBC's site is correct. It
> > basicly said plug the ethernet plug into a switch/hub and it'll do the
> rest
> > of the work by itself. That sounds to easy, I figure there will be more
> work
> > than that, but hope I can just plug it into my hardwired switch, then
use
> > the upling port to sent to my D-link outside.
> >
> >
> > Thanks for the help. I think I understand, if not set me straight! :-)
> >
> > Bryan
> >
> > >
> > > For the connection to the outbuilding, if your new Ethernet switch has
> > > auto-crossover just connect a LAN jack on the D-Link to any jack on
the
> > > Ethernet switch. Else, if your Ethernet switch has an uplink jack,
use
> > that
> > > to connect to the D-Link. Otherwise, you'll need a crossover cable
> > between
> > > the buildings. You can convert your existing cable to a crossover
cable
> > by
> > > taking a short crossover cable and joining it to your existing cable
> with
> > a
> > > CAT5 inline coupler
> > > (http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=...).
> > >
> > > Good luck.
> > >
> > > Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
> > >
> > > "Bryan" <BryanW20@gbronline.com> wrote in message
> > > news:10buqginnvl6l4d@corp.supernews.com...
> > > > After waiting 4 years DSL is finally available, and I'm supposed to
> get
> > my
> > > > modem in a day or 2, with service starting next week. I have the
house
> > > wired
> > > > with cat5 and been networked for a long time, no problems there.
Added
> a
> > > > D-Link 614+ wireless router a year or so ago, and it works great for
> > > serving
> > > > my notebooks. Well with my DSL modem arriving is supposed to be a
> 2wire
> > > > 1000HW model, with built in wireless. I can't seem to find online
> manual
> > > or
> > > > instructions. I did see that it's supposed to be "smart" to know
when
> > you
> > > > plug an Ethernet cable into it, and any hub/switch it knows what to
> do.
> > I
> > > > assume I will figure all this out when it gets here, but what I want
> to
> > > do,
> > > > and hence the posting to the wireless group, is take my d-link to an
> out
> > > > building on my property that is also hardwired with cat5 to increase
> the
> > > > wireless range in my yard. How do I set the 2 different wireless
hubs
> to
> > > > work together, and how do I make the NIC's connect to on or the
other
> > > > automatically?
> > > >
> > > > I tried to google, but can't find my answer.
> > > >
> > > > Thanks
> > > > Bryan
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
!