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Windows 7 same problems different dollar...

Last response: in Windows 7
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September 15, 2009 3:41:49 PM

So far my Windows 7 experience has been almost exactly the same as my Vista experience. After doing a clean install I was left with 3 directories that appeared to be GUID names -- i.e. "as1234sdfaek9097532lkhgfasf32424". Ran some Windows 7 updates and got another one -- 4 of these "mysterious" directories in total.

So I was successfull at deleting 3 out of the 4, but the 4th directory just didn't permit me (Administrator) to delete it (Access Denied). So once again I'm in Google research land trying solve a problem that shouldn't exist (I feel sorry for the normal human race that actually try to use this POS Windows 7). I tried Safe Mode, I tried creating the "real" Administrator account and logging into that, I tried cmd "Run as Administrator" and RMDIR, still "Access Denied".

So I look at the "owner" of this directory (it should be me since this was a new install and I'm the only person that uses my PC" -- turns out the owner is "Unknown" followed by S-1-5-21...1003 -- WTF who is this owner, all I did was a fresh install and run Windows 7 Updates. So, digging some more I figure out how to take "ownership" of this directory -- key being to also "include sub-directories" and finally I'm able to delete the directory. One would think that since I installed the OS, and I creatd my Admin account, that the OS would realize that I'm the OWNER, hello!!! What a LAME security implemenation, the same lame one that is in Vista.

Clearly, Microsoft just aren't gettin' it -- your average user isn't going to figure this out or most likely will just leave the Windows 7 updates directories/garbage on their drives (some of these garbage folders are huge, 2-3GB). It's mind boggling that Windows 7 really is just Vista SP3. It took less than an hour for me to run into yet again problems with Microsoft's OS and once again I'm wasting my time Googling for solutions.

As far as compatibility, try installing AOE III on Windows 7 - oh it doesn't and Windows 7 even warns you it will not work and "Check for solutions" -- I check the solution is .... drum roll ... there is NO solution - one of Microsoft's own games!!! I'm cracking up at just how lame Windows 7 is, I'm sure it will sell to those that think the interface is better (pretty always sells), but deep down it's clearly the same old junk that is Vista.

Honestly folks, don't waste your money on Windows 7 upgrade, if you think it is different from Vista, you will be sadly disappointed.
a b $ Windows 7
September 15, 2009 4:04:40 PM

Thank you for sharing.
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
September 15, 2009 9:12:20 PM

V8VENOM said:
So, digging some more I figure out how to take "ownership" of this directory -- key being to also "include sub-directories" and finally I'm able to delete the directory. What a LAME security implemenation, the same lame one that is in Vista.
The file and object security infrastructure you're describing was first introduced with the original version of Windows NT way back in the 90's. If you're using any of the 32-bit versions of Windows, you're already dealing with it. It's a sound architecture that has stood the test of time.

Sometimes the biggest problem with a car is the nut that holds the wheel.... ;) 
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September 15, 2009 9:37:16 PM

2-3GB x 4 = 8-12GB OH NOEEESSSS! Any computer sold with Win7 will most likely come with an HD over 500GB, that's not more than 2% of the HDD. It's not a big deal. You've got to have MASSIVE OCD problems if you can't handle having 4 directories on your computer, especially since they're there to help you?

As for update directories.....They are there in case you need to undo an update. THAT is why they are huge, they contain all the information to undo any update that it pertains to. Honestly, this is not something that in any way pertains to the average user and or even an enthusiast. If your way is so much better, write your own Mac/ Windows hybrid as your avatar suggests.
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September 15, 2009 9:53:39 PM

Problem is you're thinking inside the box and the focus of this problem is not about "taking ownership" -- as I said, that was my solution on how to remove this folder. If you were thinking outside the box, you would have said "hey wait a minute, I installed the OS, I've logged in under Admin account, I am the OWNER" --but as with many users, you're thinking within the box.

Because it has always operated as such (going back to NT and the 90's) does NOT justify anything nor suggest it has stood the test of time. In fact, 114,000+ viruses that have circumvented this "security" model would suggest it has NOT stood the test of time at all. Given the sales figures of Vista (even with massive marketshare) it would also suggest this "security" infrastructure is not acceptable from a usability perspective. Your average user isn't going to know or understand why they aren't the OWNER.

Anyway back to the real problem:
1. Windows Update and/or OS Install process created an "Unknown" SID - this is not good.
2. Admin account (the "root" admin account) was still excluded for accessing.
3. Temporary folders like this should be removed appropriately and not left in obvious site (of the root of my boot drive) the first time someone opens explorer.

Funny how Tom's senior editor was quick to list applications that wouldn't work on OSX Snow Leopard, but doesn't mention anything about apps/games that will not work on Windows 7 -- even funnier that it's the first game (AOE III) I try to install that failed, even more amusing that the game is a Microsoft game.

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September 15, 2009 9:54:22 PM

All this coming from a guy with an apple avatar. Suprise suprise.

Btw, I installed Sacrifice on my Vista 64 PC and it works fine. Same with many older games I own.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 15, 2009 9:58:25 PM

load up a linux live cd, mount the drive, chmod 777, them remove it, not too hard
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September 15, 2009 10:06:44 PM

brendano257 said:
2-3GB x 4 = 8-12GB OH NOEEESSSS! Any computer sold with Win7 will most likely come with an HD over 500GB, that's not more than 2% of the HDD. It's not a big deal. You've got to have MASSIVE OCD problems if you can't handle having 4 directories on your computer, especially since they're there to help you?

As for update directories.....They are there in case you need to undo an update. THAT is why they are huge, they contain all the information to undo any update that it pertains to. Honestly, this is not something that in any way pertains to the average user and or even an enthusiast. If your way is so much better, write your own Mac/ Windows hybrid as your avatar suggests.


Ah, so now you've decided what is and isn't a big deal? I see you folks don't want to address the issue, just side step and try to focus on something else. I realize this is common form of debate among fan boys and girls, however, look at the facts as presented.

No OS should be producing GUID dirs off the root/boot drive. This is just sloppy cleanup -- also existed in Vista. Like I said, Windows 7 is Vista with a different name and slight facelift.

Windows 7 is Microsoft as usual -- didn't take long to discover that -- hopefully they'll offer Windows 7 to WinXP downgrades on new computers so others aren't FORCED to suffer this mickey mouse security model ... again.
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September 15, 2009 10:26:04 PM

You say potato
And I say potahto
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
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September 15, 2009 10:30:33 PM

TheDraac said:
You say potato
And I say potahto
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz


Informative and valuable contribution ... exactly what I expect from Microsoft Windows hardware forum ... errrr ... I mean Tom's Hardware.
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September 15, 2009 10:38:15 PM

Why thank you Venom....
Sorry I don't like apples..... I like peaches better.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 15, 2009 10:46:07 PM

V8VENOM said:


Windows 7 is Microsoft as usual -- didn't take long to discover that -- hopefully they'll offer Windows 7 to WinXP downgrades on new computers so others aren't FORCED to suffer this mickey mouse security model ... again.

Are you honestly suggesting that Win7 is less secure than XP?

Honestly?

:lol: 
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September 15, 2009 10:48:02 PM

the point is the directory is for uninstalling updates and you can turn off that feature if you so wish. services manager windows backup manager is the service. and age of empires 3 is developed by ensemble studios not microsoft they just published it. they have nothing to do with the coding of the game
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September 15, 2009 10:54:59 PM

just because you installed it doesn't mean that the owner of the folder will be the administrator. there are alot of accounts that are hidden and run various system services and functions. you try to sound like you know the intricate details of how windows works but you obviously don't understand the permissions structure.
if you REALLY want to get rid of it, administrators can take ownership of any file or folder. do that. then close out of the permissions window and the folder properties. go back in, give yourself permissions and delete it.
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September 15, 2009 11:44:31 PM

V8VENOM said:

Because it has always operated as such (going back to NT and the 90's) does NOT justify anything nor suggest it has stood the test of time. In fact, 114,000+ viruses that have circumvented this "security" model would suggest it has NOT stood the test of time at all. Given the sales figures of Vista (even with massive marketshare) it would also suggest this "security" infrastructure is not acceptable from a usability perspective. Your average user isn't going to know or understand why they aren't the OWNER.

.


To equate that NTFS problems have anything to do with the proliferation of viruses on the windows platform demonstrates your fundamental lack of understanding of the file system and how it works with the operating system. Windows has more viruses because it is more profitable for virus writers. OSX is no more secure than windows...just a perception. It isn't profitable to write viruses if no money can be made.

I would suggest that you avoid technology and just pack up your pc and ship it back to the manufacturer because you really don't have enough understanding to run anything.

Anyone who believes your recommendation is simply not very bright. You have one experience that you are surely not technically equipped to handle and you think you have the only correct opinion--that windows 7 sucks!

You are so wrong on so many levels but I don't think there is enough room here to write it all. Windows 7 is faster, more secure and stable than Vista and certainly as fast but much more secure than xp. It also runs faster than OSX on my notebook...you see I run them all---so i think that unless you have empirical data to back up your story, you should keep your opinion to yourself.

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a c 209 $ Windows 7
September 16, 2009 12:20:28 AM

V8VENOM said:
Problem is you're thinking inside the box and the focus of this problem is not about "taking ownership" -- as I said, that was my solution on how to remove this folder. If you were thinking outside the box, you would have said "hey wait a minute, I installed the OS, I've logged in under Admin account, I am the OWNER" --but as with many users, you're thinking within the box.

I agree that install kits that leave garbage folders lying around is very annoying, and IMHO that's a perfectly valid criticism.

BUT your gripes about ownership are bogus - the problem isn't the concept of ownership per se, but rather the fact that you didn't understand how ownership and file security works and therefore were frustrated in your attempts to remove the file.

Again, that's not a fault of the OS. It's a design feature that's ALWAYS been in NTFS, and being amazed that Windows 7 is "just like Vista" in this regard simply demonstrates your lack of understanding.

As most administrators know, being able to set ownership and specify security on files that limits Administrative access is a key requirement to ensure privacy and confidentiality. And your comment on viruses is amusing because if Administrative accounts really did have blanket access to all files then the virus problem would be MUCH worse (especially given how many XP users do all their work using and Administrative account, a horrible practice IMHO).
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a b $ Windows 7
September 16, 2009 1:29:21 AM

Um... I want to avoid all the angry discussion above. Maybe there is a problem with the way Windows implements folder security/permissions, and maybe there isn't. I won't judge. Anyway, an easy way to delete a folder you want to forcibly destroy with or without the OS's consent is Unlocker. Easily rename, delete, or move anything the OS wants to stop you from modifying. I use it very frequently.
DISCLAIMER: Only use Unlocker if you know what you are doing. You can do some serious damage if you use it on a file you shouldn't.
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a c 416 $ Windows 7
September 16, 2009 7:51:04 PM

i just found a hidden folder on my g5 and i can't remove it!!!!!lol!!!!!!!!!!
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September 16, 2009 9:00:22 PM

parleyp said:
To equate that NTFS problems have anything to do with the proliferation of viruses on the windows platform demonstrates your fundamental lack of understanding of the file system and how it works with the operating system. Windows has more viruses because it is more profitable for virus writers. OSX is no more secure than windows...just a perception. It isn't profitable to write viruses if no money can be made.

I would suggest that you avoid technology and just pack up your pc and ship it back to the manufacturer because you really don't have enough understanding to run anything.

Anyone who believes your recommendation is simply not very bright. You have one experience that you are surely not technically equipped to handle and you think you have the only correct opinion--that windows 7 sucks!

You are so wrong on so many levels but I don't think there is enough room here to write it all. Windows 7 is faster, more secure and stable than Vista and certainly as fast but much more secure than xp. It also runs faster than OSX on my notebook...you see I run them all---so i think that unless you have empirical data to back up your story, you should keep your opinion to yourself.


Windows 114,000+ viruses vs. OS X 0 (Zero) -- I'm defining a virus/malware or any software that is able to gain access to one's computer without the user entering their credentials (password) to do so.

If you define Virus as "existing" sure there are many that exist targeting OSX -- but every single OSX virus that has gain access to a user's resources has REQUIRED the user to enter the account password. THIS IS NOT the case with Windows XP, Vista, and 7 -- on Microsoft's platforms the user just needs to hit an Ok button or even a faked Close X or faked Cancel and the Virus is in -- one of many ways to enter a Windows along with crashing Services to gain elevated rights.

So are you saying that OSX has NO marketshare because they don't have single virus (as defined above)? Last check Apple was around 8-10% marketshare.

But I see your intent on diverting the key issues using "ownership" as an excuse. As I said, I had to take ownership of an "unknown" SID and this can be done via an Admin account. I'm very well aware of how security works (although I'd suggest 90% of users don't want to be involved in how it works, just that it works or in this case doesn't) as that's how I was able to discover this bogus "unknown" SID that had control of this directory. So you're arguement attempting to discredit my knowledge of this Windows 7 OS, or Vista is silly and obviously a fanboy reaction ... typical Junior grade debating.

Windows 7 is just like Vista - proof is above in my OP. You brought into this thread NTFS going back to Windows NT -- did I say Vista isn't like NT? No I didn't, you somehow made a ridiculous assumption I did?? No idea where you got that from but it sounds like a typical infussion of informtion "not mentioned" to valid YOUR point? Vista was based on Windows 2000 code, Windows 2000 code was based on NT (Windows XP follows the same code source path back to NT also).

Thinking outside the box, means understanding that:
1. NOT all computers are in a cooperate environment and have NO need for differential user accounts.
2. Consumers exists that buy a computer and OWN it - this is user context (something Microsoft refuse to acknowledge)
3. The OS doesn't OWN the user

You are unfortunately under the impression that a computer should control the user, not the user controlling the computer. Computers are tools. This is the box that you appear to have bought into -- it's always been like that so therefore is must be good -- that logical progression leads to a dead end world.

The day Microsoft failed and the reason they're loosing BIG chunks of marketshare is the day they said "security is the user's problem". User rejected this in Vista, and they gonna do the same with Windows 7. Or I suppose you think Vista was a success for Microsoft? If you do feel Vista is good and sold well, then there really is not point in a continued discussion with you.

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September 16, 2009 9:02:34 PM

SR-71 Blackbird said:
i just found a hidden folder on my g5 and i can't remove it!!!!!lol!!!!!!!!!!


Nice try at diversion, but as I said in my original post, these Windows 7 folders aren't hidden, of the root drive and easy to spot.
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a c 416 $ Windows 7
September 16, 2009 9:25:00 PM

mac will always be a minor player.........go bill gates!!!!!!!!!!
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September 16, 2009 9:30:34 PM

Bolbi said:
Um... I want to avoid all the angry discussion above. Maybe there is a problem with the way Windows implements folder security/permissions, and maybe there isn't. I won't judge. Anyway, an easy way to delete a folder you want to forcibly destroy with or without the OS's consent is Unlocker. Easily rename, delete, or move anything the OS wants to stop you from modifying. I use it very frequently.
DISCLAIMER: Only use Unlocker if you know what you are doing. You can do some serious damage if you use it on a file you shouldn't.


Point of my post is why do I even have an "Unknown" SID in control of a folder? This is an account that doesn't exist.

This was a fresh install I performed under my admin account -- someone has to install the OS at some point soooo..... All I did was run Windows updates and I got these folders left on my root drive.

I later ran ATI driver install and Creative Labs driver install and attempted to install AOE III -- and look at the mess I had left over. This is basic stuff that many users will attempt to do. Overtime if this left over temp dirs stay around they'll continue to eat up disk space and slow my system down.

Every single file you add to a hard drive will slow the OS down -- that's why people seem to think a new OS install makes their PC seem "faster", it's because there isn't much on it -- start adding a bunch of stuff and it starts to slow down and the registry gets bigger and bigger and bigger.

This is why Window 7 is like Vista and like XP and like 2000 and like NT, Microsoft seem intent in just leaving junk that is not need on one's hard drive and/or in one's registry. This is the same reason why windows applications will make 40-50 calls to the exact same registry entry when they start -- nothing is optimized. You can easily validate/monitor just how crappy microsoft's code is with filemon and regmon. You'll be left wondering why on earth they just didn't call this entry once during app load and make it global rather than call it 50 times. I do know the answer to this, it's Microsoft way of developing apps, they taught (best practices) to NOT make anything Global because it uses memory and is hard to parse out and manage projects.

In the real world, it is actually Ok to use some global workspace to improve efficiency, just don't OVER use it -- it's this fear that has lead Microsoft developers into these packaged apps that call the same registry entry 50+ times for a single task rather than use a global scope.

Getting off topic now, but clearly Windows 7 is no better than Vista, and heck I could at least run AOE III on Vista, can't on Windows 7.

I think Microsoft got somewhat taken down the wrong road -- a road lead by cooperate IT, not realizing that cooperate users are also human. Also not realizing that cooperate users and home users were about 50/50. It's almost as if they felt a computer MUST have some higher entity governing it -- the Admin User and the real "Administator" two similar but different accounts.

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September 16, 2009 9:40:13 PM

SR-71 Blackbird said:
mac will always be a minor player.........go bill gates!!!!!!!!!!


Bill Gates?? You do know he's not pulling the strings anymore right?

Based on what I read on Tom's, I sorta hope Mac's remain a minor player, but they've increased from 5% to 10% marketshare in a relatively short period of time while Microsoft are losing marketshare (even more so in the Browser arena where it's down to 67% IE).

The more Windows user the better, Windows user spend on average 4X more time fixing/research problems than Mac users. This means that Mac users are getting more done -- in this job market/economy, the one who gets more done is the desirable one.

-- Apple just needs enough Marketshare, not a majority.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 16, 2009 10:09:43 PM

V8VENOM.... there is one minor detail you seem to be overlooking..............

No one is forcing you to buy Windows 7 when it goes on general release, thats part of the reason Microsoft allow you to download the Beta's and RC so you can trial the new product without parting wiht any cash.

Windows by and large needs to be able to run / open old files and programs as well as new ones. Now no one is going to tell you everything will work 100% - but priorties lie with business users first as this is MS's core market.

Anyway show me an OS without flaws...
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
September 16, 2009 10:26:24 PM

V8VENOM said:
Windows 7 is just like Vista - proof is above in my OP.
The thing I'm missing is why you're expecting it to be any different in regards with the basic NTFS security mechanism. That's what you were complaining about.

From your original post:
One would think that since I installed the OS, and I creatd my Admin account, that the OS would realize that I'm the OWNER, hello!!! What a LAME security implemenation, the same lame one that is in Vista.

This is fundamental to the security architecture, always has been, and if you expect it to change then I'm afraid you're just "not getting it"... :??: 
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September 16, 2009 11:43:56 PM

Scotteq said:
Thank you for sharing.



+1 :lol: 
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September 19, 2009 12:30:43 AM

I actually like macs, and osx, but some dude in history class decided to talk about his mac book and how great it was and how he was going to use it for a presenation. Im 39 years old, i work full time, i want to get in,get the class over, so lno love for macs today.
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Best solution

a b $ Windows 7
September 19, 2009 7:31:50 PM

Security begins and ends in one place... THE PERSON USING THE COMPUTER. That's it. Take responsibility for your own security and you'll have that you'll have ZERO security issues. Switching over to OS X because it "has no viruses" is just another way to avoid responsibility. I don't have virus issues on any of my computers... and I run Windows Vista. By your logic, my computers should be rife with viruses... but guess what? They aren't. Do you know why? Because I don't rely on other people to keep my computer secure.

Would you go walking down a dark alley at night knowing some maniac was lurking about? Of course not. Why then would you insist upon going to websites that are less than reputable or open just any executable attatchment in your email? People that buy Apple because it "has no viruses" are too lazy to take responsibility for their actions and be proactive... you'd rather be passive and let someone else do it for you.

You're computer is as secure as you make it... regardless of the OS you use. If you're used to taking the easy way out, it's no wonder you have so many issues with Windows. Your bias is clear... you've made it so on many occasions. If you go in expecting a bad experience, then you're clearly going to find something to make it a bad experience rather than looking at any possible positives.

My guess is you never looked at Linux or any other OS that keep root priviledges separate from administrative privileges. That security is in place for a reason... but I guess the logic escapes you... you are a Mac user after all.
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September 19, 2009 7:44:52 PM

To bad Win 7 is more secure than Snow Leopard
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September 19, 2009 7:47:24 PM

Ive used ubuntu a few times, its too bad linux isnt more mainstream, then we could say to hell with apple and microsoft
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September 19, 2009 8:43:38 PM

So, let me get this straight, V8VENOM:

You want your old(er) game to work on an OS that hasn't been officially released to the public yet, but you also want Microsoft to change (or remove) the underlying basis of the OS (namely, the registry) so that every piece of software ever created to run on the OS won't run? If you thought Vista was bad (which, after SP1, became an excellent OS), that registryless-OS would certainly run Microsoft into the ground.

Then you want to be able to use administrator rights to delete anything on the computer because YOU are the owner, and then complain because Windows has malware that does the exact same thing to corrupt your computer?

Windows and the PC market thrive on choice, something the Apple camp isn't used to. Those directories are there to give you a choice to remove a certain update. Maybe in your particular instance, you don't need that choice, but perhaps someone else will. On behalf on Microsoft, let me extend to you my deepest apologies that the most popular OS (well, Windows, anyway) in the world doesn't cater to you.
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a c 416 $ Windows 7
September 20, 2009 1:46:03 AM

if apple had a decent marketshare they would have the same if not more security issues!
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a b $ Windows 7
September 20, 2009 3:06:06 AM

They do have security issues... no one chooses to exploit them, that's all.
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September 22, 2009 4:09:14 PM

this issue bugs me also when im trying to delete something I know is ussles wasting my space but windows wont alow me to!(except windows xp) it irratates the sh*t out of me! although i ahve to say tha t windows 7 isnt as anoying as vista.

ill chose w7 over vista any day!
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September 22, 2009 4:26:49 PM

Quote:

This means that Mac users are getting more done -- in this job market/economy, the one who gets more done is the desirable one.


I know one Mac user that isn't getting more done... :o  Seriously though...Windows has come a long way over the years. I still remember going from Win 3.1 to Win 95. What a difference that was...Windows 7 is a huge improvement over Vista from what I've seen...and remember, this is just a release candidate. It is assumed that there will be bugs in it. I'm a linux user and love trying out different OSs.

I hate to admit it, but Windows 7 has taken a lot of things that have been in the linux distros for years and has made them better. I think Microsoft is starting to pay attention. The main problem that still remains is the price.

Other than that, I think Win7 will be very popular and widespread in its use. It's very user friendly for the uninitiated and is much more streamlined than its predecessors. "Responsive" is the word that usually comes to mind. Compatibility will come down the road once the product is actually released. (I do love the irony that AoEIII didn't run out of the box hahaha)
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
September 22, 2009 5:24:52 PM

hatter said:
I hate to admit it, but Windows 7 has taken a lot of things that have been in the linux distros for years and has made them better.
Do you do scripting in Linux? If so, you should check out PowerShell - it's the very embodiment of your statement...
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September 22, 2009 5:38:46 PM

Quote:
So far my Windows 7 experience has been almost exactly the same as my Vista experience. After doing a clean install I was left with 3 directories that appeared to be GUID names -- i.e. "as1234sdfaek9097532lkhgfasf32424". Ran some Windows 7 updates and got another one -- 4 of these "mysterious" directories in total.


Umm this folders are created by the patching EXE and not the OS. This is the standard way that a MS patch works. It creates a random folder name on the drive with the most available space that it has write access to. Yes it could be D: even. Then it extracts itself there and executes the actually patch installation from that folder. Now if the patch needs a reboot the folder is locked so that it survies a reboot and the user can't accidentily delete it. Each time the patch it run a new folder is made, the same patch will make different folders. Then when the patch is done this folder is deleted, but not always if there is a log file that is left behind. (Kind of a bug).

This has been happening since Windows 95/98 as it is the patching process that does it, not the OS. Not all patches work this way, but most now do. Uninstallation is normally held as a hinden / compressed folder in the C:\windows folder. The windows update downloads are held at another location. The update could have been one that a user has downloaded manually and executed.

If Apple wanted to they could do their patches in the same way.

A lot of these patching methods were designed so that they will work in a different environments from the home PC to Entreprise.
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October 14, 2009 12:59:01 PM

i wish i could have used snow leopard in beta so i could complain about how bad a beta is running. dude your using test software. if your so inclined to get rid of that file why dont you boot in a live cd and remove it that way. and no im not a windows fan boy nor a mac fan boy. im just saying windows is not perfect but hell apple is far from it as well
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October 17, 2009 9:15:13 AM

I converted all my workstations to Mac OS X several years ago, because I was spending too much time (about 50 hours per year per machine) keeping my Windows boxes running well. I spent about 1 hour per year per machine maintaining Panther-based Macs, and about 5 hours per year per machine maintaining Leopard-based Macs. I now run Windows XP only as virtual machines on the Macs, and it's very well behaved. Have things improved in Windows land since XP. Can you actually run a Windows Vista or Windows 7 PC for a several years with no performance degradation? That was the big issue for me--My Windows PCs suffered performance degradation over time and needed frequent maintenance to run well, while the Macs ran better over time as OS updates actually improved performance.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2009 2:21:48 PM

@saiena, MS claims that they have improved at least background defragging in this Engineering Blog post. There is still evidence that performance (i.e., boot times) degrades over time. Read this. However, I'm not really sure what kind of "maintenance" you mean. If you can tell specifically what you mean, I might be able to help better. (Disclosure: I'm a loyal Windows user, though I think your reason for going to OSX is better than most.)
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November 10, 2009 7:27:51 PM

If you make this post about how Apple is better than Windows 7, then you are pushing an Agenda and naturally no matter how pure or righteous your message, nobody is going to listen to you and will continue to thrash you.

You have now basically just become a door-to-door bible thumper.

And about your "issue", I've installed Windows 7 on six different computers, versions ranging from Professional 32bit to Enterprise 32 and 64bit and Ultimate 32 and 64bit and I have yet to see this issue you are speaking about. I bet I can install Windows 7 on your computer using your Windows 7 edition and NOT run into the same issue you are running into.

You just simply don't know how to do things properly in a Microsoft Environment because your too busy being in love with Apple. And on another note, I hardly love Microsoft or am a Windows "fanboy". I really don't care. I use Linux and Windows at work, and have Windows and Mac at home. I have them all working the way I like and I don't have any issues.

You just need to learn to use a computer.
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January 4, 2010 3:46:25 PM

iv been running windows 7 pro 64-bit for the better part of a month. no problems at all. 50second start up times from pressing the power button to full function. Got myself Avast Virus protection and have had zero issues. all my games run fine with the virtual XP module. all my new games run Fine no glitches.

Intel q9400 native 2.66GHz OC'd 3.2GHz
4gigs ddr2 1066 munchkin ram
nvidia GeForce 250
Asus P5Q Turbo socket 775
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March 14, 2012 10:27:43 AM

sminlal said:
The file and object security infrastructure you're describing was first introduced with the original version of Windows NT way back in the 90's. If you're using any of the 32-bit versions of Windows, you're already dealing with it. It's a sound architecture that has stood the test of time.

Sometimes the biggest problem with a car is the nut that holds the wheel.... ;) 


And sometimes the wheels fall off & the nut is left holding a wheel with no undercarriage or forward motion !
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a b $ Windows 7
March 15, 2012 8:43:11 AM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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