802.16 ... I get the impression from this article...

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/news/article.php/3363411

With this article I got the impression that some of the industry leaders may
have messed with 802.16 and may have thought it would have some big problems
due to its frequency that it relys on. Eventhough I do hope more
frequencies are adopted later on, the unlicensed frequency means more
companies can compete because they don't have to purchase from the FCC
licenced frequencies. I sure do hope 802.16 can deliver on NLOS 70Mbps up
to 10 miles or whatever and it won't be vaporware of some sort.

I would expect if WiMax gets into the licensed frequencies then it would
become more like cellphones and you would need a wireless device designed
for that region your in. Frequencies are licensed differerently depending
upon the country you are in. I think that would limit the competition of
these wireless devices and might even slow development. Maybe the wireless
devices (bridges, routers, gateways... whatever) could be sold where the
frequency would be enabled with firmware downloaded from the web with the IP
address giving your location and allowing licensed frequecies for that
region to be enabled. Just some rambling thoughts.

I'm very excited about WiMax because this links by two hobbies, I love
traveling through the third world because its cheap but I'm limited in my #1
hobby surfing the net via broadband. Hopefully soon the two won't conflict
with each other.
6 answers Last reply
More about impression article
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    ahh wrote:

    > http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/news/article.php/3363411
    >
    > With this article I got the impression that some of the industry leaders may
    > have messed with 802.16 and may have thought it would have some big problems
    > due to its frequency that it relys on. Eventhough I do hope more
    > frequencies are adopted later on, the unlicensed frequency means more
    > companies can compete because they don't have to purchase from the FCC
    > licenced frequencies. I sure do hope 802.16 can deliver on NLOS 70Mbps up
    > to 10 miles or whatever and it won't be vaporware of some sort.
    >
    > I would expect if WiMax gets into the licensed frequencies then it would
    > become more like cellphones and you would need a wireless device designed
    > for that region your in. Frequencies are licensed differerently depending
    > upon the country you are in. I think that would limit the competition of
    > these wireless devices and might even slow development. Maybe the wireless
    > devices (bridges, routers, gateways... whatever) could be sold where the
    > frequency would be enabled with firmware downloaded from the web with the IP
    > address giving your location and allowing licensed frequecies for that
    > region to be enabled. Just some rambling thoughts.
    >
    > I'm very excited about WiMax because this links by two hobbies, I love
    > traveling through the third world because its cheap but I'm limited in my #1
    > hobby surfing the net via broadband. Hopefully soon the two won't conflict
    > with each other.

    I seriously doubt anyone is going to be lighting up third world
    country-sides with WiMax in the forseeable future. Got any idea what
    it's going to cost for the equipment? And just because you have a WiMax
    receiver in your laptop (that's also under debate, WiMax is supposedly
    more for fixed wireless, not roaming) doesn't mean that the local WISP
    is going to let you onto their net. How will they get their cut of the $?

    Years down the road you'll probably be able to use a laptop or cell
    phone or PDA nearly anywhere at very high speeds. But that's years away.
    There's a lot of networking to do in the meantime.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Rôgêr" <abuse@your.isp.com> wrote in message
    news:8vednSEea9ZEi1zdRVn-ig@pghconnect.com...
    > ahh wrote:
    >
    > > http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/news/article.php/3363411
    > >
    > > With this article I got the impression that some of the industry leaders
    may
    > > have messed with 802.16 and may have thought it would have some big
    problems
    > > due to its frequency that it relys on. Eventhough I do hope more
    > > frequencies are adopted later on, the unlicensed frequency means more
    > > companies can compete because they don't have to purchase from the FCC
    > > licenced frequencies. I sure do hope 802.16 can deliver on NLOS 70Mbps
    up
    > > to 10 miles or whatever and it won't be vaporware of some sort.
    > >
    > > I would expect if WiMax gets into the licensed frequencies then it would
    > > become more like cellphones and you would need a wireless device
    designed
    > > for that region your in. Frequencies are licensed differerently
    depending
    > > upon the country you are in. I think that would limit the competition
    of
    > > these wireless devices and might even slow development. Maybe the
    wireless
    > > devices (bridges, routers, gateways... whatever) could be sold where
    the
    > > frequency would be enabled with firmware downloaded from the web with
    the IP
    > > address giving your location and allowing licensed frequecies for that
    > > region to be enabled. Just some rambling thoughts.
    > >
    > > I'm very excited about WiMax because this links by two hobbies, I love
    > > traveling through the third world because its cheap but I'm limited in
    my #1
    > > hobby surfing the net via broadband. Hopefully soon the two won't
    conflict
    > > with each other.
    >
    > I seriously doubt anyone is going to be lighting up third world
    > country-sides with WiMax in the forseeable future. Got any idea what
    > it's going to cost for the equipment? And just because you have a WiMax
    > receiver in your laptop (that's also under debate, WiMax is supposedly
    > more for fixed wireless, not roaming) doesn't mean that the local WISP
    > is going to let you onto their net. How will they get their cut of the $?

    802.16e, still under development, includes support for mobile users. Fixed
    LOS versions of 802.16 are already done. 802.16 was not intended for
    end-user deployment. It is more for backhaul from a collection of LANs or
    WLANs, fabric for mesh networks, etc. It certainly could be used by single
    users, but it was not a design point to keep equipment costs down to
    homeowner-commodity levels, or to make the equipment portable enough to walk
    around with.

    802.16a supports unlicensed frequencies, but it's fixed LOS. 802.16e will be
    in licensed frequencies only.

    802.20 overlaps to some extent, and some people consider it a direct
    competitor.

    >
    > Years down the road you'll probably be able to use a laptop or cell
    > phone or PDA nearly anywhere at very high speeds. But that's years away.
    > There's a lot of networking to do in the meantime.
    >

    One analyst estimates 802.16 available sometime in 2006. The article didn't
    say whether that was 802.16e, or the fixed LOS versions.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    gary wrote:

    > "Rôgêr" <abuse@your.isp.com> wrote in message
    > news:8vednSEea9ZEi1zdRVn-ig@pghconnect.com...
    >
    >>ahh wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/news/article.php/3363411
    >>>
    >>>With this article I got the impression that some of the industry leaders
    >
    > may
    >
    >>>have messed with 802.16 and may have thought it would have some big
    >
    > problems
    >
    >>>due to its frequency that it relys on. Eventhough I do hope more
    >>>frequencies are adopted later on, the unlicensed frequency means more
    >>>companies can compete because they don't have to purchase from the FCC
    >>>licenced frequencies. I sure do hope 802.16 can deliver on NLOS 70Mbps
    >
    > up
    >
    >>>to 10 miles or whatever and it won't be vaporware of some sort.
    >>>
    >>>I would expect if WiMax gets into the licensed frequencies then it would
    >>>become more like cellphones and you would need a wireless device
    >
    > designed
    >
    >>>for that region your in. Frequencies are licensed differerently
    >
    > depending
    >
    >>>upon the country you are in. I think that would limit the competition
    >
    > of
    >
    >>>these wireless devices and might even slow development. Maybe the
    >
    > wireless
    >
    >>>devices (bridges, routers, gateways... whatever) could be sold where
    >
    > the
    >
    >>>frequency would be enabled with firmware downloaded from the web with
    >
    > the IP
    >
    >>>address giving your location and allowing licensed frequecies for that
    >>>region to be enabled. Just some rambling thoughts.
    >>>
    >>>I'm very excited about WiMax because this links by two hobbies, I love
    >>>traveling through the third world because its cheap but I'm limited in
    >
    > my #1
    >
    >>>hobby surfing the net via broadband. Hopefully soon the two won't
    >
    > conflict
    >
    >>>with each other.
    >>
    >>I seriously doubt anyone is going to be lighting up third world
    >>country-sides with WiMax in the forseeable future. Got any idea what
    >>it's going to cost for the equipment? And just because you have a WiMax
    >>receiver in your laptop (that's also under debate, WiMax is supposedly
    >>more for fixed wireless, not roaming) doesn't mean that the local WISP
    >>is going to let you onto their net. How will they get their cut of the $?
    >
    >
    > 802.16e, still under development, includes support for mobile users. Fixed
    > LOS versions of 802.16 are already done. 802.16 was not intended for
    > end-user deployment. It is more for backhaul from a collection of LANs or
    > WLANs, fabric for mesh networks, etc. It certainly could be used by single
    > users, but it was not a design point to keep equipment costs down to
    > homeowner-commodity levels, or to make the equipment portable enough to walk
    > around with.
    >
    > 802.16a supports unlicensed frequencies, but it's fixed LOS. 802.16e will be
    > in licensed frequencies only.
    >
    > 802.20 overlaps to some extent, and some people consider it a direct
    > competitor.
    >
    >
    >>Years down the road you'll probably be able to use a laptop or cell
    >>phone or PDA nearly anywhere at very high speeds. But that's years away.
    >>There's a lot of networking to do in the meantime.
    >>
    >
    >
    > One analyst estimates 802.16 available sometime in 2006. The article didn't
    > say whether that was 802.16e, or the fixed LOS versions.

    I've heard that Walmart is readying to test WiMax. If tests go well,
    every damn Walmart will also be a NOC with AP on the roof, waltz in and
    get your CPE and hook it up at home. I bet that'll really piss off Bill
    Gates if Walmart captures a computer sector before he figures out how.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    gary wrote:

    > One analyst estimates 802.16 available sometime in 2006. The article didn't
    > say whether that was 802.16e, or the fixed LOS versions.

    I forgot to mention, Towerstream in Chicago is already touting that they
    are offering WiMax. Not bad considering the standard hasn't been adopted
    yet.

    http://www.mobilepipeline.com/news/18900229
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Well, this is fixed 802.16. That's either 802.16, which was approved 4/8/02,
    or 802.16a, approved 4/1/03. 802.16a adds support for frequencies in the 2 -
    11 Ghz range, including unlicensed bands.

    802.16e, with mobile support, just became a project 6 months ago. It has a
    long way to go, and it's probably the one that some people are saying won't
    be implemented until 2006.

    "Rôgêr" <abuse@your.isp.com> wrote in message
    news:I6udnZBfKs5tpVzdRVn-gg@pghconnect.com...
    > gary wrote:
    >
    > > One analyst estimates 802.16 available sometime in 2006. The article
    didn't
    > > say whether that was 802.16e, or the fixed LOS versions.
    >
    > I forgot to mention, Towerstream in Chicago is already touting that they
    > are offering WiMax. Not bad considering the standard hasn't been adopted
    > yet.
    >
    > http://www.mobilepipeline.com/news/18900229
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Your probably right about the roaming. Thats probably at least 5-10 years
    away. But neverless I do expect within about 2-3 years my city Cebu City
    Philippines to have some form of inexpensive fixed broadband wireless that
    will allow me to move to a more remote beach location or something. Right
    now I'm stuck with DSL in the city and with me wanting to come here for
    cheap tropical ocean access its a shame internet connectivity is holding me
    back at me going all the way with my dreams. Many articles I've read expect
    the undeveloped world to take ahold of WiMax rather quickly. I do expect it
    to work and do expect it to be fairly inexpenive but I admit this is all
    with my fingers crossed. Only time will tell. I will be watching the
    progress of 802.16 very closely.


    "Rôgêr" <abuse@your.isp.com> wrote in message
    news:8vednSEea9ZEi1zdRVn-ig@pghconnect.com...
    > ahh wrote:
    >
    > > http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/news/article.php/3363411
    > >
    > > With this article I got the impression that some of the industry leaders
    may
    > > have messed with 802.16 and may have thought it would have some big
    problems
    > > due to its frequency that it relys on. Eventhough I do hope more
    > > frequencies are adopted later on, the unlicensed frequency means more
    > > companies can compete because they don't have to purchase from the FCC
    > > licenced frequencies. I sure do hope 802.16 can deliver on NLOS 70Mbps
    up
    > > to 10 miles or whatever and it won't be vaporware of some sort.
    > >
    > > I would expect if WiMax gets into the licensed frequencies then it would
    > > become more like cellphones and you would need a wireless device
    designed
    > > for that region your in. Frequencies are licensed differerently
    depending
    > > upon the country you are in. I think that would limit the competition
    of
    > > these wireless devices and might even slow development. Maybe the
    wireless
    > > devices (bridges, routers, gateways... whatever) could be sold where
    the
    > > frequency would be enabled with firmware downloaded from the web with
    the IP
    > > address giving your location and allowing licensed frequecies for that
    > > region to be enabled. Just some rambling thoughts.
    > >
    > > I'm very excited about WiMax because this links by two hobbies, I love
    > > traveling through the third world because its cheap but I'm limited in
    my #1
    > > hobby surfing the net via broadband. Hopefully soon the two won't
    conflict
    > > with each other.
    >
    > I seriously doubt anyone is going to be lighting up third world
    > country-sides with WiMax in the forseeable future. Got any idea what
    > it's going to cost for the equipment? And just because you have a WiMax
    > receiver in your laptop (that's also under debate, WiMax is supposedly
    > more for fixed wireless, not roaming) doesn't mean that the local WISP
    > is going to let you onto their net. How will they get their cut of the $?
    >
    > Years down the road you'll probably be able to use a laptop or cell
    > phone or PDA nearly anywhere at very high speeds. But that's years away.
    > There's a lot of networking to do in the meantime.
    >
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