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Bridge and AP?

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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June 6, 2004 3:47:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I'd like to set up a wireless network as follows.

We have cable internet coming into our home office, currently into a
Netgear WGT624. Three machines are connected via wired ethernet.
Wireless works throughout the house, everything is great.

We now want to give access to the Internet via this cable connection
to an apartment across the driveway, maybe 150 feet or so, with line
of sight.

I assume I need to buy two routers that can bridge (WAP11 or WRT54G),
plug the cable modem and wired Ethernet machines into one of these,
and set it to bridge mode to send a signal across the driveway to the
other network. My question is this: can these function as wireless
APs as well, or will I need to keep the Netgear around to provide AP
functionality? It could get a little sticky given that all 4 ports on
the Netgear are currently used.

Thanks in advance,
-Justin

More about : bridge

Anonymous
June 7, 2004 12:29:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Justin" <freetek@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:42ebfb41.0406061047.4120c903@posting.google.com...
> I'd like to set up a wireless network as follows.
>
> We have cable internet coming into our home office, currently into a
> Netgear WGT624. Three machines are connected via wired ethernet.
> Wireless works throughout the house, everything is great.
>
> We now want to give access to the Internet via this cable connection
> to an apartment across the driveway, maybe 150 feet or so, with line
> of sight.
>
> I assume I need to buy two routers that can bridge (WAP11 or WRT54G),
> plug the cable modem and wired Ethernet machines into one of these,
> and set it to bridge mode to send a signal across the driveway to the
> other network. My question is this: can these function as wireless
> APs as well, or will I need to keep the Netgear around to provide AP
> functionality? It could get a little sticky given that all 4 ports on
> the Netgear are currently used.
>
> Thanks in advance,
> -Justin

If you have line of sight and only 150ft to cover, does not a machine in the
apartment fitted with a wifi card not pick up the WAP in the home office?

Perhaps it is a question of relocating the WAP to optimise the coverage of
Office and apartment?

Alternatively perhaps a repeater in the apartment is all that is required?

My impression is that if you need to bridge, you will need 3 more devices
.... a bridge in the home office, another bridge in the apartment, and a WAP
in the apartment ... wired to the bridge there ..

John
June 8, 2004 11:32:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hi John,

Could you please define "bridge" for me (readers digest version). I see
this term thrown around, and am not sure that I understand exactly what this
is. I have exactly the same problem (although much larger distances in my
case).

I am trying to go about 1000' (straight line of sight, no obstructions). I
am planning on buying 2 WAP11's and 2 external antennas. I selected the
WAP11's because of the "bridging" function, and it was cheaper than the
WAP54g. I have also seen things like the WET11 and WET54g, which claim to
be bridges as well?

This is to share an internet connection on an island in the philippines
(with the full support of the "ISP" here). Internet connection enters a
Linksys 4 port hub, and then goes to the 2 WAP11s, as below.

Linksys hub port 1 -> Linksys WAP11, bridging mode -> Yagi
directional Antenna -> 1000' of air -> Yagi directional Antenna ->
WAP11, bridging mode -> Cat5 50' line from top floor (25-30' feet
vertical height or so) -> Linksys WRT54G (routable IP addr #1) ->
computers, PDA, notebook, etc (NAT'd)

Linksys hub port 2 -> Linksys WRT54G (routable IP addr #2) ->
computers, PDA, notebook, etc (NAT'd)

I am the Linksys hub port 1 :-(

Any help greatly appreciated,

Joe


"John Beeston" <john.Beeston@talk21.com> wrote in message
news:jLUwc.11916$NK4.1598765@stones.force9.net...
>
> If you have line of sight and only 150ft to cover, does not a machine in
the
> apartment fitted with a wifi card not pick up the WAP in the home office?
>
> Perhaps it is a question of relocating the WAP to optimise the coverage of
> Office and apartment?
>
> Alternatively perhaps a repeater in the apartment is all that is required?
>
> My impression is that if you need to bridge, you will need 3 more devices
> ... a bridge in the home office, another bridge in the apartment, and a
WAP
> in the apartment ... wired to the bridge there ..
>
> John
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
June 8, 2004 5:01:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Joe" <spammersshouldbebeaten@iainttellin.com> wrote in message
news:0eb4b909dff29ca97c9d5c89f83b2e50@news.teranews.com...
> Hi John,
>
> Could you please define "bridge" for me (readers digest version). I see
> this term thrown around, and am not sure that I understand exactly what
this
> is. I have exactly the same problem (although much larger distances in my
> case).
>
> I am trying to go about 1000' (straight line of sight, no obstructions).
I
> am planning on buying 2 WAP11's and 2 external antennas. I selected the
> WAP11's because of the "bridging" function, and it was cheaper than the
> WAP54g. I have also seen things like the WET11 and WET54g, which claim to
> be bridges as well?

Linksys before was selling this signal booster box for their APs. I went to
their website and this was not offered anymore (maybe with some legalities).
It would be best with external antenna/signal booster combo.
Anonymous
June 8, 2004 6:33:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> Could you please define "bridge" for me (readers digest version). I see
> this term thrown around, and am not sure that I understand exactly what this
> is. I have exactly the same problem (although much larger distances in my

LAN in on one side, cross the wireless bridge and pop out again with LAN
on the other side.

(LAN in this context means an ethernet interface)
Anonymous
June 9, 2004 6:45:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hi, Joe,

My understanding is that Wifi units can be either

Access Point
Bridge
Client
or Repeater

Some are capable of being configured to act in any one of these modes....
some are dedicated to one mode or the other.

An Access point allows clients to connect to it and then onto the LAN (or
possiblyWAN if the device has a wide area port (ADSL?))

A bridge (really a half bridge) connects over the wireless to another bridge
and allows traffic from the LAN connected to one bridge to be seen on the
LAN connected to the other bridge...

A client connects to an Access Point.

A repeater sits between an Access Point and client and relays the signals to
increase distance, at least in theory ... my experiments with a D-Link 900
in this mode have not been encouraging ... this may be because the other
equipment involved in not D-Link ...

Your scenario sounds as though it will work ... with 2 independent networks
joined by a pair of bridges ...


One wonders whether a WRT54G with an external yagi, could satisfy the wired
and wireless requirement at the first end .... and whether the extra range
provided by the external antenna would satisfy the wireless users at the
second location... I see ranges of 5 miles being mentioned. (and in some
cases 28 kilometers)

I think if you have wired users at the second location then you have no
option but to bridge...

John



"Joe" <spammersshouldbebeaten@iainttellin.com> wrote in message
news:0eb4b909dff29ca97c9d5c89f83b2e50@news.teranews.com...
> Hi John,
>
> Could you please define "bridge" for me (readers digest version). I see
> this term thrown around, and am not sure that I understand exactly what
this
> is. I have exactly the same problem (although much larger distances in my
> case).
>
> I am trying to go about 1000' (straight line of sight, no obstructions).
I
> am planning on buying 2 WAP11's and 2 external antennas. I selected the
> WAP11's because of the "bridging" function, and it was cheaper than the
> WAP54g. I have also seen things like the WET11 and WET54g, which claim to
> be bridges as well?
>
> This is to share an internet connection on an island in the philippines
> (with the full support of the "ISP" here). Internet connection enters a
> Linksys 4 port hub, and then goes to the 2 WAP11s, as below.
>
> Linksys hub port 1 -> Linksys WAP11, bridging mode -> Yagi
> directional Antenna -> 1000' of air -> Yagi directional Antenna ->
> WAP11, bridging mode -> Cat5 50' line from top floor (25-30' feet
> vertical height or so) -> Linksys WRT54G (routable IP addr #1) ->
> computers, PDA, notebook, etc (NAT'd)
>
> Linksys hub port 2 -> Linksys WRT54G (routable IP addr #2) ->
> computers, PDA, notebook, etc (NAT'd)
>
> I am the Linksys hub port 1 :-(
>
> Any help greatly appreciated,
>
> Joe
>
>
> "John Beeston" <john.Beeston@talk21.com> wrote in message
> news:jLUwc.11916$NK4.1598765@stones.force9.net...
> >
> > If you have line of sight and only 150ft to cover, does not a machine in
> the
> > apartment fitted with a wifi card not pick up the WAP in the home
office?
> >
> > Perhaps it is a question of relocating the WAP to optimise the coverage
of
> > Office and apartment?
> >
> > Alternatively perhaps a repeater in the apartment is all that is
required?
> >
> > My impression is that if you need to bridge, you will need 3 more
devices
> > ... a bridge in the home office, another bridge in the apartment, and a
> WAP
> > in the apartment ... wired to the bridge there ..
> >
> > John
> >
> >
>
>


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