Notebook screens: are they DVI driven?

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I have an inspiron 6000, with the WXGA screen.

I was curious----is this driving the screen with a regular SVGA analog line
discipline, or are notebook screens inherently digitally driven?

Thanks.


--
Everythinginlifeisrealative.Apingpongballseemssmalluntilsomeoneramsitupyournose.
12 answers Last reply
More about notebook screens driven
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Thomas G. Marshall wrote:
    ^
    > I have an inspiron 6000, with the WXGA screen.
    >
    > I was curious----is this driving the screen with a regular SVGA
    > analog line discipline, or are notebook screens inherently digitally
    > driven?

    They are digitally driven, but not with DVI but with a proprietary
    system depending on the panel...

    Benjamin
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sat, 17 Sep 2005 04:21:53 GMT, "Thomas G. Marshall"
    <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com> wrote:


    >
    >Panel-specific line discipline?

    Each maker sets their own standars. Many are very close (and some
    match) DVI standards. However, connectors are going to be different,
    some signals may be different, etc.

    >
    >Having thunk about this for some time, I'm still confused. Do I have the
    >ability to change the video card in my notebook, just like I can with the
    >desktop?

    Absolutely not. 1. the video adapter is built into the MB. 2. No slots
    for a new adapter. 3. Should you get an adapter in there, no room for
    the cable to outside monitor. 4. No chance you could interface with
    the built-in LCD screen.

    >If so, isn't there some unifying standard for digital signal
    >output (like, oh, DVI-D or DVI-I), so that I need not get, for example, a
    >card dedicated to and hardwired specifically for the Dell's various screens?

    What you'd really need is a new notebook... <g> Say you are
    determined, and there is a notebook that has the video adapter you
    wish to use, and say the motherboard matches the one in your notebook,
    you might be able to do a complete MB swap. But, why bother, it would
    take more work and money than a new one.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Thomas G. Marshall"
    <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:BRMWe.116$265.42@trndny07:

    > Having thunk about this for some time, I'm still confused. Do I have
    > the ability to change the video card in my notebook, just like I can
    > with the desktop?


    As a general rule, No.

    I once transplanted a video card from a broken IBM thinkpad 770Z to an
    earlier 770(Non-Z) to get the extra VRAM that the Z's card used. In that
    case, the video card was a daughterboard inside the laptop. And the
    exception rather than the rule. The daughterboard was probably extremely
    proprietary, I doubt I could have used it in anything other than a 770.


    The video connectors DO appear to be the same across several differnet
    brands I've had apart (Dell, IBM, HP, Toshiba), but I suspect this is
    largely merely a coincidence of everyone buying the connectors from the
    same source, I doubt the pinouts are the same.

    With the exception of user-removable items like PCMCIA/Cardbus, SO-Dimm
    memory, and mini-pci modems and wireless cards, there's almost ZERO
    industry standardization in laptops.


    - FM -
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "PeterD" <peter2@hipson.net> wrote in message
    news:er6oi1h2gh8jevc9ldps59b30svp7epuni@4ax.com...
    > On Sat, 17 Sep 2005 04:21:53 GMT, "Thomas G. Marshall"
    > <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>Panel-specific line discipline?
    >
    > Each maker sets their own standars. Many are very close (and some
    > match) DVI standards. However, connectors are going to be different,
    > some signals may be different, etc.
    >
    >>
    >>Having thunk about this for some time, I'm still confused. Do I have the
    >>ability to change the video card in my notebook, just like I can with the
    >>desktop?
    >
    > Absolutely not. 1. the video adapter is built into the MB. 2. No slots
    > for a new adapter. 3. Should you get an adapter in there, no room for
    > the cable to outside monitor. 4. No chance you could interface with
    > the built-in LCD screen.
    >
    >>If so, isn't there some unifying standard for digital signal
    >>output (like, oh, DVI-D or DVI-I), so that I need not get, for example, a
    >>card dedicated to and hardwired specifically for the Dell's various
    >>screens?
    >
    > What you'd really need is a new notebook... <g> Say you are
    > determined, and there is a notebook that has the video adapter you
    > wish to use, and say the motherboard matches the one in your notebook,
    > you might be able to do a complete MB swap. But, why bother, it would
    > take more work and money than a new one.


    That's all true for low-end laptops, but many high-end laptops, including
    Dell, have user-changeable video cards.

    Tom
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sat, 17 Sep 2005 14:06:37 GMT, "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net>
    wrote:


    >
    >That's all true for low-end laptops, but many high-end laptops, including
    >Dell, have user-changeable video cards.
    >
    >Tom

    Thanks for the update, Tom. I don't have a Dell notebook (but do have
    another brand...) and though it is a high-end one, it doesn't (AFAIK)
    allow a video card swapout. It does have a mini-PCI slot however. <g>
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Fred Mau coughed up:
    > "Thomas G. Marshall"
    > <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com> wrote in
    > news:BRMWe.116$265.42@trndny07:
    >
    >> Having thunk about this for some time, I'm still confused. Do I have
    >> the ability to change the video card in my notebook, just like I can
    >> with the desktop?
    >
    >
    > As a general rule, No.
    >
    > I once transplanted a video card from a broken IBM thinkpad 770Z to an
    > earlier 770(Non-Z) to get the extra VRAM that the Z's card used. In
    > that case, the video card was a daughterboard inside the laptop. And
    > the exception rather than the rule. The daughterboard was probably
    > extremely proprietary, I doubt I could have used it in anything other
    > than a 770.
    >
    >
    > The video connectors DO appear to be the same across several differnet
    > brands I've had apart (Dell, IBM, HP, Toshiba), but I suspect this is
    > largely merely a coincidence of everyone buying the connectors from
    > the same source, I doubt the pinouts are the same.
    >
    > With the exception of user-removable items like PCMCIA/Cardbus,
    > SO-Dimm memory, and mini-pci modems and wireless cards, there's
    > almost ZERO industry standardization in laptops.


    Since it looks like laptops are replacing desktops more and more, I would
    expect then that the small-house pc manufacterers would be having a harder
    and harder time, since notebooks can only be fab'd by larger companies.

    Unless, of course, there are some generic laptop chasis + screens + power
    supplies, etc., on the horizon. That would allow someone to build their own
    dream machine, much in the way they can do desktops now.


    --
    Doesn't /anyone/ know where I can find a credit card company that
    emails me the minute something is charged to my account?
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "PeterD" <peter2@hipson.net> wrote in message
    news:l3toi1dbbbd3io1jvetru01meh34skol9u@4ax.com...
    > On Sat, 17 Sep 2005 14:06:37 GMT, "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>That's all true for low-end laptops, but many high-end laptops, including
    >>Dell, have user-changeable video cards.
    >>
    >>Tom
    >
    > Thanks for the update, Tom. I don't have a Dell notebook (but do have
    > another brand...) and though it is a high-end one, it doesn't (AFAIK)
    > allow a video card swapout. It does have a mini-PCI slot however. <g>

    Dell laptops can be quite nice in this regard! The video card is about the
    only thing I haven't upgraded on my Inspiron 8200...the CPU is socketed and
    I've changed it, it has a mini-PCI slot and I've added then upgraded WiFi
    cards,
    of course memory and hard drive, and am about to change out my CD-R/DVD
    drive for a dual layer DVD burner. I like having a laptop where I am not
    locked in.

    George
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Thomas G. Marshall"
    <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Doesn't /anyone/ know where I can find a credit card company that
    >emails me the minute something is charged to my account?

    You don't understand how credit card processing works, or how
    antiquated their infrastructure is. "High-speed" modems to them mean
    1200 baud, they still run nightly batch jobs to run the charges, and
    they've got so much invested in The Way Things Are that change is
    _very_ slow.

    For instance, until recently, "online" transactions meant "Drop a file
    into a directory, I'll notice it, read it, dial a 1200 baud modem into
    a mainframe, get your results, and write a file into that same
    directory."
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    <William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
    news:aumqi198a0r87b2i5htj3473onhbnvse9b@4ax.com...
    > "Thomas G. Marshall"
    > <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Doesn't /anyone/ know where I can find a credit card company that
    > >emails me the minute something is charged to my account?
    >
    > You don't understand how credit card processing works, or how
    > antiquated their infrastructure is. "High-speed" modems to them mean
    > 1200 baud, they still run nightly batch jobs to run the charges, and
    > they've got so much invested in The Way Things Are that change is
    > _very_ slow.
    >
    > For instance, until recently, "online" transactions meant "Drop a file
    > into a directory, I'll notice it, read it, dial a 1200 baud modem into
    > a mainframe, get your results, and write a file into that same
    > directory."

    Part of this has to do with the actual signal processing. They prefer
    it clean, simple, and uncompressed. The less that is done to the signal the
    less chance there is for error and compromise. There is also the issue of a
    world wide network with equipment from just about every generation from the
    original keypad only (no swipe) terminals to wireless multipurpose readers.

    Many use batch file processing to cut down on over head and to allow for
    multiple transactions in a single session during a low volume time period
    for both the processor and the CC clearing house. Usually the choice is a
    matter of cost and bulk. Companies that provide services with scheduled
    billings to CCs use batch billing at a lower cost to them from the CC
    company. Cost that get passed down to the customer. All CC companies (and
    they are really the guys doing all the debit cards as well) us a mixture of
    billing systems, batch, transaction, etc.

    Most banks and such actually have this done by third party companies.
    Most simple act as a pass-through, however a few have been found to store
    data (AKA the clearing house in AZ that recently got hacked for thousands of
    VISA card customers info. Despite their contract with VISA the explicitly
    prohibits it from retaining any customer data.)

    Some companies do a per customer transaction billing and some do
    batches. Additionally some do a check billing to verify the card is good
    but then batch bill for the actual amount. Non-pin debit card transactions
    are often done this way. Additionally some companies have their independent
    franchises batch bill them and then the company batch bills the CC
    companies. This can add two to three days to the actual transaction from
    delivery of goods/services to actual billing of the customers CC account.
    Though with some CC & debit cards there can appear a pending charge for the
    actual amount. Not sure how that works though.

    Fraud alerts may be a nuisance at times, but the alternative is worse.
    Said fraud alert features also allow CC companies to make their much touted
    no loss claims that if a customers care is lost/stolen and fraudulent
    charges are made, the customer will not be held liable. The TV commercials
    on identity theft are amusing, but each of them can be backed up by actual
    fraud cases. It's always funny as long as it isn't happening to you.

    Push may come one day, but there are still issues. Hardware, software
    and transmission cost to name a few. Then there is the security issue for
    the transmission and storage of any information pushed to a customer. With
    the current state of hacking on most portable devices, not to mention the
    potential for simple hardware theft, I personally would rather not have any
    such information pushed to my cell/pda/blackberry/handheld. They can secure
    it on their servers and I can wait to access it via a more secure means when
    I get home.

    I'm not paranoid.
    Just an enlightened target.
    KC
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    In article <aumqi198a0r87b2i5htj3473onhbnvse9b@4ax.com>, <Unknown>
    says...
    >
    >You don't understand how credit card processing works, or how
    >antiquated their infrastructure is. "High-speed" modems to them mean
    >1200 baud, they still run nightly batch jobs to run the charges, and
    >they've got so much invested in The Way Things Are that change is
    >_very_ slow.


    Wrong headed thinking. They are not dummies, and they use 1200 baud
    modems because they are soooooo much faster for this use.

    1200 baud negotiates a connection almost instantly, and very few bytes
    of data are transferred so speed hardly matters. A 28.8K or 56K modem
    takes vastly longer just to negotiate a connection. A 1200 baud modem
    is in and out long before a faster modem can even connect, vastly faster
    than 56K could ever be. Nice and simple, and very fast!

    1200 baud modems are still used by small shops, but mostly the
    transactions for new setups are done via internet links today.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Kevin Childers coughed up:

    ....[rip]...

    > Push may come one day, but there are still issues. Hardware,
    > software and transmission cost to name a few. Then there is the
    > security issue for the transmission and storage of any information
    > pushed to a customer. With the current state of hacking on most
    > portable devices, not to mention the potential for simple hardware
    > theft, I personally would rather not have any such information pushed
    > to my cell/pda/blackberry/handheld. They can secure it on their
    > servers and I can wait to access it via a more secure means when I
    > get home.

    Thanks for all that information.

    A question about pushed information security: What really need be pushed?
    I'm not sure I would lose sleep over someone hacking, say, the email
    database and gleening the:

    vendor
    amount
    date

    {shrug}. That's all that really need be pushed to me over email.
    Furthermore, CC companies really *ought* to be killing themselves trying to
    implement this: it would radically decrease the customer's detection time of
    fraud, and hence the total theft. I suppose.


    --
    http://www.allexperts.com is a nifty way to get an answer to just about
    /anything/.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Wayne coughed up:
    > In article <aumqi198a0r87b2i5htj3473onhbnvse9b@4ax.com>, <Unknown>
    > says...
    >>
    >> You don't understand how credit card processing works, or how
    >> antiquated their infrastructure is. "High-speed" modems to them mean
    >> 1200 baud, they still run nightly batch jobs to run the charges, and
    >> they've got so much invested in The Way Things Are that change is
    >> _very_ slow.
    >
    >
    > Wrong headed thinking. They are not dummies, and they use 1200 baud
    > modems because they are soooooo much faster for this use.
    >
    > 1200 baud negotiates a connection almost instantly, and very few bytes
    > of data are transferred so speed hardly matters. A 28.8K or 56K
    > modem takes vastly longer just to negotiate a connection. A 1200
    > baud modem is in and out long before a faster modem can even connect,
    > vastly faster than 56K could ever be. Nice and simple, and very fast!

    Makes sense. That V.90/92 "kerrrrrrrrsshhhhhh-kaBOING PONG PONG" business
    seemed to take forever back when I had no choice but to use dialup. But
    then, I'm the impatient sort...


    >
    > 1200 baud modems are still used by small shops, but mostly the
    > transactions for new setups are done via internet links today.


    --
    With knowledge comes sorrow.
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