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Question on backup recovery floppy

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September 12, 2005 2:49:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

I want to do a full backup of my system using the backup utility. The
instructions indicate I need a floppy disc to restore system recovery
information. I don't have a floppy drive... so my question is, will the
backup utility automatically us my cdrw drive?
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 5:55:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

Robin

You can set it to save to a hard drive or tape drive, which can then be
burned to CD's.. if you want a backup of your entire system, look to Acronis
TrueImage.. do not use Windows Backup..

http://www.acronis.com

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/User


"Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:795C81D1-027C-449D-B88A-067CEDE2499D@microsoft.com...
>I want to do a full backup of my system using the backup utility. The
> instructions indicate I need a floppy disc to restore system recovery
> information. I don't have a floppy drive... so my question is, will the
> backup utility automatically us my cdrw drive?
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 6:02:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

"...so my question is, will the backup utility automatically us[e] my cdrw
drive?"

"Windows Backup Does Not Back Up to CD-R, CD-RW, or DVD-R Devices"
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;315255

If you're serious about backing up your complete hard disk - which is a wise
and excellent idea - you would do well to look into disc imaging software.
Such software will make a complete copy of your entire disc (or a partition)
quickly and easily, and you can easily restore the same.

There are several disc imaging programs, but two that are often mentionned
are Symantec's Norton Ghost 9.0
(http://www.symantec.com/sabu/ghost/ghost_personal/index...) and Acronis'
True Image 8.0 (http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage...),
both of which are widely available at a discounted price.

You do need to take your time, however, because the seemingly simple act of
"imaging" a hard disk is actually quite complex. You'll want to read the
instructions very carefully before you try it. However, once you're all set
with what to do, you'll wonder how you ever got along without disc imaging
software!
--
Ted Zieglar
"You can do it if you try."

"Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:795C81D1-027C-449D-B88A-067CEDE2499D@microsoft.com...
> I want to do a full backup of my system using the backup utility. The
> instructions indicate I need a floppy disc to restore system recovery
> information. I don't have a floppy drive... so my question is, will the
> backup utility automatically us my cdrw drive?
September 12, 2005 7:31:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

> "Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:795C81D1-027C-449D-B88A-067CEDE2499D@microsoft.com...
>> I want to do a full backup of my system using the backup utility. The
>> instructions indicate I need a floppy disc to restore system recovery
>> information. I don't have a floppy drive... so my question is, will the
>> backup utility automatically us my cdrw drive?


"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:e2nUgQ8tFHA.996@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> "...so my question is, will the backup utility automatically us[e] my cdrw
> drive?"
>
> "Windows Backup Does Not Back Up to CD-R, CD-RW, or DVD-R Devices"
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;315255
>
> If you're serious about backing up your complete hard disk - which is a
> wise
> and excellent idea - you would do well to look into disc imaging software.
> Such software will make a complete copy of your entire disc (or a
> partition)
> quickly and easily, and you can easily restore the same.
>
> There are several disc imaging programs, but two that are often mentionned
> are Symantec's Norton Ghost 9.0
> (http://www.symantec.com/sabu/ghost/ghost_personal/index...) and
> Acronis'
> True Image 8.0 (http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage...),
> both of which are widely available at a discounted price.
>
> You do need to take your time, however, because the seemingly simple act
> of
> "imaging" a hard disk is actually quite complex. You'll want to read the
> instructions very carefully before you try it. However, once you're all
> set
> with what to do, you'll wonder how you ever got along without disc imaging
> software!
> --
> Ted Zieglar
> "You can do it if you try."


Robin:
Ted's advice re using a disk imaging program such as Symantec's Norton Ghost
or Acronis True Image is sound advice and I hope you will take it to heart.

But I want to make one comment concerning his statement that the "imaging
(process of a) hard disk is actually quite complex". It is true that from
the disk imaging program's point of view the process of "cloning" one disk
to another disk *is* quite complex. But that should *not* be translated as
indicating that from a user's perspective it's a complex undertaking.
Actually it's a rather simple & straightforward process for the user to
undertake. We're speaking here of a direct disk-to-disk cloning operation,
i.e., cloning the contents of your day-to-day working HD to another HD,
either internal or external. I assume that is your primary, if not exclusive
interest.

To be sure it is always wise, as Ted suggests, to read the instructions
accompanying the software. But sad to say, those "instructions" frequently
leave a lot to be desired in terms of their "understandability", especially
for inexperienced PC users. And this is true for both Ghost & ATI. In an
effort to be comprehensive, the "User's Manual" frequently winds up being
incomprehensible to the user. More's the pity since as I mentioned above,
using these software programs to create basic disk-to-disk clones is a
relatively simple & painless process.

Anyway, consider the use of one of these programs to routinely &
systematically back up your system. You'll never regret it. They're both
fine programs. If you decide to use Symantec's Norton Ghost, my
recommendation is to purchase the Ghost 2003 version. In my view it's
superior to the (latest) Ghost 9 version for straight disk-to-disk cloning
using an easily-created bootable floppy disk (or bootable CD). And the Ghost
2003 version can be had quite cheaply from online vendors. I've seen it
selling for $4.99 (download) - see
http://www.tekdealers.com/?pg=product_details&ref=95684....

If you want step-by-step instructions for using the Ghost 2003 (or the
Acronis program), so indicate.
Anna
!