Need opinion on wireless network

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hi all:

I have a 802.11b wireless network setup. I experienced the slowness
of the network when multiple computers access each other's resource
simultaneously. My question is: if I upgrade my 802.11b rounter to g
but keep using the old 802.11b PC cards, should I expect higher speed?

To put it simple, let me go by examples. I have four computers: A, B,
C and D. When A is copying files from B, C is copying files from D at
the same time. With my current setup, the total bandwidth I believe
is 11Mbps due to the limitation of 802.11b. If I ONLY upgrade my
router to 802.11g, but not the PC cards, can I bump the total
bandwidth to 22Mbps?

Any advices are highly appreciated.

Mickey
7 answers Last reply
More about need opinion wireless network
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    myanghua@yahoo.com (Mickey Yang) wrote in message news:<5f6e5c99.0406101937.1584b58e@posting.google.com>...
    > Hi all:
    >
    > I have a 802.11b wireless network setup. I experienced the slowness
    > of the network when multiple computers access each other's resource
    > simultaneously. My question is: if I upgrade my 802.11b rounter to g
    > but keep using the old 802.11b PC cards, should I expect higher speed?
    >
    > To put it simple, let me go by examples. I have four computers: A, B,
    > C and D. When A is copying files from B, C is copying files from D at
    > the same time. With my current setup, the total bandwidth I believe
    > is 11Mbps due to the limitation of 802.11b. If I ONLY upgrade my
    > router to 802.11g, but not the PC cards, can I bump the total
    > bandwidth to 22Mbps?
    >
    > Any advices are highly appreciated.
    >
    > Mickey


    I don't think it will give you any increase because they will all be
    using the same channel. They will still be contending with each other
    at 11 Mbps (the router will still communicate with the workstations
    using 802.11b).

    Pete
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    No, your connection is as quick as your weakest link. Your cards won't be
    able to connect to your router's 802.11g "side", but only to 802.11b "side".
    If your cards support 22Mbps you will get that speed provided the router
    also supports it, if not you will get the same 11Mbps. If you need to
    connect simultaneously look for specials and get 802.11g router and cards,
    preferably from same manufacturer. Look for so called "turbo" cards. I use
    US Robotics and it works great. Currently in turbo mode it has 100Mbps, but
    in March they sad that in June they will have a firmware upgrade that will
    boost it to 125Mbps. Knowing US Robotics slowness with upgrade releases, we
    might see this upgrade by December if we're lucky.

    "Mickey Yang" <myanghua@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:5f6e5c99.0406101937.1584b58e@posting.google.com...
    > Hi all:
    >
    > I have a 802.11b wireless network setup. I experienced the slowness
    > of the network when multiple computers access each other's resource
    > simultaneously. My question is: if I upgrade my 802.11b rounter to g
    > but keep using the old 802.11b PC cards, should I expect higher speed?
    >
    > To put it simple, let me go by examples. I have four computers: A, B,
    > C and D. When A is copying files from B, C is copying files from D at
    > the same time. With my current setup, the total bandwidth I believe
    > is 11Mbps due to the limitation of 802.11b. If I ONLY upgrade my
    > router to 802.11g, but not the PC cards, can I bump the total
    > bandwidth to 22Mbps?
    >
    > Any advices are highly appreciated.
    >
    > Mickey
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Adam wrote:
    > No, your connection is as quick as your weakest link. Your cards
    > won't be able to connect to your router's 802.11g "side", but only to
    > 802.11b "side". If your cards support 22Mbps you will get that speed
    > provided the router also supports it, if not you will get the same
    > 11Mbps. If you need to connect simultaneously look for specials and
    > get 802.11g router and cards, preferably from same manufacturer. Look
    > for so called "turbo" cards. I use US Robotics and it works great.
    > Currently in turbo mode it has 100Mbps, but in March they sad that in
    > June they will have a firmware upgrade that will boost it to 125Mbps.
    > Knowing US Robotics slowness with upgrade releases, we might see this
    > upgrade by December if we're lucky.
    >

    Also, be aware that if you mix 11b and 11g devices on the same network then
    it will all run at 11b speeds. So if you do upgrade one thing be prepared to
    upgrade the lot, or at least turn off the 11b devices to get 11g speeds with
    the rest.

    And, be aware that the 11Mbps/54Mbps bandwidth is shared between all devices
    so if you are transferring files betwwen two machines, via a router then
    each will only get ~half the bandwidth. Bearing in mind that overheads for
    transport protocols, encryption keys and data collisions takes a big chunk
    of bandwidth too and you will probably only see around 2Mbps transfer rates
    of real data on an 11b network when copying/moving files between machines.

    --
    Email replies will not be read. Please reply to newsgroup.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Yes this is true. PC Magazine rated US Robotics as top performer because it
    had speed around 27Mbps internet and LAN. This is far from advertised
    100Mbps. Others had much worst. You will never get full advertised speed on
    wireless, that is why if you want to share files you want to get the best
    product possible. You can not look at companies advertised speed but you
    have to look at independent reviews, and only buy the product in the store
    where you can return it.

    "Tiny Tim" <_tim_dodd@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:2ittrkFrbsuiU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > Also, be aware that if you mix 11b and 11g devices on the same network
    then
    > it will all run at 11b speeds. So if you do upgrade one thing be prepared
    to
    > upgrade the lot, or at least turn off the 11b devices to get 11g speeds
    with
    > the rest.
    >
    > And, be aware that the 11Mbps/54Mbps bandwidth is shared between all
    devices
    > so if you are transferring files betwwen two machines, via a router then
    > each will only get ~half the bandwidth. Bearing in mind that overheads for
    > transport protocols, encryption keys and data collisions takes a big chunk
    > of bandwidth too and you will probably only see around 2Mbps transfer
    rates
    > of real data on an 11b network when copying/moving files between machines.
    >
    > --
    > Email replies will not be read. Please reply to newsgroup.
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Fri, 11 Jun 2004 15:28:04 +0100, "Tiny Tim" <_tim_dodd@hotmail.com> wrote:

    ~ Also, be aware that if you mix 11b and 11g devices on the same network then
    ~ it will all run at 11b speeds. So if you do upgrade one thing be prepared to
    ~ upgrade the lot, or at least turn off the 11b devices to get 11g speeds with
    ~ the rest.

    This is not quite so. With 11b and 11g clients in the same cell,
    transmissions to/from the 11g clients will be at 11g rates and
    to/from the the 11b clients will be at 11b rates.

    What is true is that, with 11b clients heard in the cell,
    the RTS/CTS protection mechanism will kick in, substantially
    reducing your throughput. So if you want to maximize your
    11g throughput, you do want to turn off the 11b clients.

    Aaron

    ---

    ~ And, be aware that the 11Mbps/54Mbps bandwidth is shared between all devices
    ~ so if you are transferring files betwwen two machines, via a router then
    ~ each will only get ~half the bandwidth. Bearing in mind that overheads for
    ~ transport protocols, encryption keys and data collisions takes a big chunk
    ~ of bandwidth too and you will probably only see around 2Mbps transfer rates
    ~ of real data on an 11b network when copying/moving files between machines.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Thank Pete, Adam and Tiny for sharing their knowledge. Now that I
    couldn't mix any 802.11b devices with 11g devices in the same wireless
    network in order to get 54Mbps speed, I'm thinking if it's feasible to
    do the following because I couldn't afford 4 11g cards at one time.

    Suppose I connect my new 11g router to cable modem and use a different
    WEP key than my existing network. And then reuse my old 11b rounter
    and connect it to the 11g router as normal computer. So new 11g
    device will talk to the 11g network while old 11b devices continue to
    communicate through my old router via the new router. If this plan
    works, I can enjoy higher bandwidth for the new devices before I
    completely move onto 11g.

    Does it sound feasible?

    Thanks,

    Mickey
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Aaron Leonard" <Aaron@Cisco.COM> wrote in message
    news:fi5kc0ltofcjilob72cb631n1o9bvn1euf@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 11 Jun 2004 15:28:04 +0100, "Tiny Tim" <_tim_dodd@hotmail.com>
    wrote:
    >
    > ~ Also, be aware that if you mix 11b and 11g devices on the same network
    then
    > ~ it will all run at 11b speeds. So if you do upgrade one thing be
    prepared to
    > ~ upgrade the lot, or at least turn off the 11b devices to get 11g speeds
    with
    > ~ the rest.
    >
    > This is not quite so. With 11b and 11g clients in the same cell,
    > transmissions to/from the 11g clients will be at 11g rates and
    > to/from the the 11b clients will be at 11b rates.
    >
    > What is true is that, with 11b clients heard in the cell,
    > the RTS/CTS protection mechanism will kick in, substantially
    > reducing your throughput. So if you want to maximize your
    > 11g throughput, you do want to turn off the 11b clients.

    If there are enough 802.11b clients, or just a few very active ones,
    performance can be sufficiently degraded to cause all of the 802.11g clients
    to renegotiate down to 12 Mbps. Effectively, the net has been dragged down
    to 802.11b rates.

    >
    > Aaron
    >
    > ---
    >
    > ~ And, be aware that the 11Mbps/54Mbps bandwidth is shared between all
    devices
    > ~ so if you are transferring files betwwen two machines, via a router then
    > ~ each will only get ~half the bandwidth. Bearing in mind that overheads
    for
    > ~ transport protocols, encryption keys and data collisions takes a big
    chunk
    > ~ of bandwidth too and you will probably only see around 2Mbps transfer
    rates
    > ~ of real data on an 11b network when copying/moving files between
    machines.
    >
Ask a new question

Read More

Wireless Network WiFi and Home Networking Wireless Networking