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Dell's Slide

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July 19, 2005 12:28:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?

If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
once famous support, it would still be provided.

My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
support quality any where.

More about : dell slide

Anonymous
July 19, 2005 1:05:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Bill wrote:
> Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
> us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
> profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
> in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
> who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>
> If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
> once famous support, it would still be provided.
>
> My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
> tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
> offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
> to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
> support quality any where.

Warranty is a contract and the issues seem to be that Dell is having
some difficulty honoring the terms of whatever warranties are in force,
for whatever reason Dell has. Possible reasons are low product profit
margins coupled with any or all of deteriorating product quality,
increasing consumer expectations of performance, high level of product
returns, etc. Dell is also having to go the extra mile in coupons,
discounts, freebies, and the like in order to maintain both product
volume sales and total revenues in a market with falling product prices,
intense competition, and falling numbers of new computer purchases.

I fail to see where the customer's choice of warranty model has any
impact on Dell's warranty service and support obligations.

Q
July 19, 2005 4:00:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

here's my two cents, support is important to us the consumer to Dell it is
another story.
Dell has one objective and that is to make money, support does not do that
as a matter of fact
it is a drain on the cash flow. That is why in my opinion it has been
reduced in quality, in other words
cheapened. I don't like it but that is my spin.

"Bill" <bgross@nospan.airmail.net> wrote in message
news:o mvpd1l93rrmginkocel4dktjpijmkposa@4ax.com...
> Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
> us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
> profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
> in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
> who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>
> If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
> once famous support, it would still be provided.
>
> My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
> tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
> offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
> to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
> support quality any where.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 4:00:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

BigJim wrote:
> here's my two cents, support is important to us the consumer to Dell it is
> another story.
> Dell has one objective and that is to make money, support does not do that
> as a matter of fact
> it is a drain on the cash flow. That is why in my opinion it has been
> reduced in quality, in other words
> cheapened. I don't like it but that is my spin.
>
>

While support may be important to the customer, just how
vital is it? Support should not mean hand-holding the user
who does not want to read the manual. Nor should support
mean attempting to resolve a third-party question beyond
the scope of the computer system as it is delivered. Nor
should support be used as the teacher for neophyte users
when both free and tuition-based education programs are
available to many users. IOW, support should be used for
the purpose for which it was intended...not the way it is
being currently (ab)used.
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 11:55:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"BigJim" <woody10277@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:F5mdnboecPsHvkDfRVn-2A@comcast.com...
> here's my two cents, support is important to us the consumer to Dell it is
> another story.
> Dell has one objective and that is to make money, support does not do that
> as a matter of fact
> it is a drain on the cash flow. That is why in my opinion it has been
> reduced in quality, in other words
> cheapened. I don't like it but that is my spin.

The extent of the slide seems to be wider than just post-sales support
though.

I tried ordering a PC from them last Thursday. However, despite getting the
'Thank You For Your Order' web page I've not received the promised
confirmation email and have yet to receive a significant and satisfactory
response to any of my emails to the complaints department, the Outlet
department nor the emails and voice mail to the 'Sales Executive' dealing
with the order.

This is for a NEW SALE for heaven's sake!

See my thread entitled '(UK Dell) Tracking an order' below.

JJ (UK)
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 11:55:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Have you phoned Dell Customer Service? Did you get an order number, and if
so, did you check the order status on the website? I received my order
confirmation within two hours of placing my online order. My follow up
email arrived early the next morning after my late evening order, or about
36 hours later.

There seems to be some problem with you guys in the UK and Dell. I've never
seen so many issues so centered on one geographic location. And, if you
also check newsgroups like comp.periphs.printers, you Brits have some
serious printer maladies.

"JJ (UK)" <nah@way.com> wrote in message
news:zUcDe.3440$Hd4.1912@newsfe2-gui.ntli.net...
> "BigJim" <woody10277@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:F5mdnboecPsHvkDfRVn-2A@comcast.com...
>> here's my two cents, support is important to us the consumer to Dell it
>> is
>> another story.
>> Dell has one objective and that is to make money, support does not do
>> that
>> as a matter of fact
>> it is a drain on the cash flow. That is why in my opinion it has been
>> reduced in quality, in other words
>> cheapened. I don't like it but that is my spin.
>
> The extent of the slide seems to be wider than just post-sales support
> though.
>
> I tried ordering a PC from them last Thursday. However, despite getting
> the
> 'Thank You For Your Order' web page I've not received the promised
> confirmation email and have yet to receive a significant and satisfactory
> response to any of my emails to the complaints department, the Outlet
> department nor the emails and voice mail to the 'Sales Executive' dealing
> with the order.
>
> This is for a NEW SALE for heaven's sake!
>
> See my thread entitled '(UK Dell) Tracking an order' below.
>
> JJ (UK)
>
>
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 1:30:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Kevin" <webman6@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:yYhDe.90$NS2.25012@news.uswest.net...
> Have you phoned Dell Customer Service? Did you get an order number, and
if
> so, did you check the order status on the website?

No, I only got a reference number and was unable to track the order with
that alone.

> There seems to be some problem with you guys in the UK and Dell.

You got that right!

--
JJ (UK)
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 1:34:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

To quite an automobile TV sport featuring a prominent former industry
chairman-----"I couldn't have said it better myself".



"Bill" <bgross@nospan.airmail.net> wrote in message
news:o mvpd1l93rrmginkocel4dktjpijmkposa@4ax.com...
> Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
> us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
> profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
> in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
> who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>
> If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
> once famous support, it would still be provided.
>
> My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
> tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
> offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
> to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
> support quality any where.
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 1:41:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

oops,,,,,,,,,,,SPOT.

"Irene" <girlsrule@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:x2vDe.21$U%6.7@fe05.lga...
> To quite an automobile TV sport featuring a prominent former industry
> chairman-----"I couldn't have said it better myself".
>
>
>
> "Bill" <bgross@nospan.airmail.net> wrote in message
> news:o mvpd1l93rrmginkocel4dktjpijmkposa@4ax.com...
>> Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
>> us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
>> profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
>> in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
>> who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>>
>> If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
>> once famous support, it would still be provided.
>>
>> My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
>> tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
>> offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
>> to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
>> support quality any where.
>
>
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 2:38:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"JJ (UK)" <nah@way.com> wrote in message
news:uQoDe.3692$yH4.3406@newsfe2-win.ntli.net...
> "Kevin" <webman6@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:yYhDe.90$NS2.25012@news.uswest.net...
>> Have you phoned Dell Customer Service? Did you get an order number, and
> if
>> so, did you check the order status on the website?
>
> No, I only got a reference number and was unable to track the order with
> that alone.
>
>> There seems to be some problem with you guys in the UK and Dell.
>
> You got that right!
>
> --
> JJ (UK)
>
>

If I recall the original post, the order was from the Outlet? You don't get
an order number or tracking number from the Outlet in the US either.

Tom
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 3:08:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Irene wrote:
>
> oops,,,,,,,,,,,SPOT.

Also, QUOTE! <g>

Notan
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 4:24:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
news:CQpDe.11425$iG6.5388@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>
>
> If I recall the original post, the order was from the Outlet? You don't
get
> an order number or tracking number from the Outlet in the US either.
>
> Tom

Correct. Which was one reason why I was asking if anyone knew if it was
possible to track the order.

Still waiting for a response from them!

JJ (UK)
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 5:19:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Kevin" <webman6@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:yYhDe.90$NS2.25012@news.uswest.net...

> There seems to be some problem with you guys in the UK and Dell. I've
> never seen so many issues so centered on one geographic location. And, if
> you also check newsgroups like comp.periphs.printers, you Brits have some
> serious printer maladies.

Yeah and we pay more for the privelege!

Chris
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 11:31:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

What can I say. I have long finger nails and it makes typing on a computer
keyboard some what challenging.
No excuse for not catching the typo's before I posted, though.


"Notan" <notan@ddress.com> wrote in message
news:42DE8512.AC771ED8@ddress.com...
> Irene wrote:
>>
>> oops,,,,,,,,,,,SPOT.
>
> Also, QUOTE! <g>
>
> Notan
July 21, 2005 10:27:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Just like IBM has done for decades, many computer manufacturers as
well as support companies are sliding back towards corporation and
big-business-based support. The long-term corporate strategies of
some companies are leaning towards higher certifications for on-site
server and network-based technical support staff. Many believe home
computers will become so inexpensive and cheap that the typical
break-fix residential and small-business service calls won't be worth
the time, money or effort. A 3-year warranty will cost more than
buying a new computer outright. Luckily the break-fix trend is still
cost-effective for laptops, although most of my calls had still been
for desktops. Dell might drop desktop support altogether and only
provide on-site support for laptops.

A good example of de-valued computer equipment is todays printers...it
costs more money to fix than to buy a new printer (hell, it costs more
to buy a new INK CARTRIDGE than to buy a new printer with the ink
cartridge included).

Dan

On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 08:28:00 -0500, Bill <bgross@nospan.airmail.net>
wrote:

>Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
>us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
>profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
>in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
>who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>
>If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
>once famous support, it would still be provided.
>
>My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
>tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
>offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
>to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
>support quality any where.
Anonymous
July 21, 2005 10:27:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 18:27:53 -0400, Dan <jasdfosd@asjedfoi.com> wrote:

>hell, it costs more
>to buy a new INK CARTRIDGE than to buy a new printer with the ink
>cartridge included).

Maybe not. I heard some new printers come with cartridges half full.
--
Top 10 Conservative Idiots:
http://www.democraticunderground.com/top10/
July 25, 2005 1:12:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Not only that, if you pay the premium for CompleteCare, you still get poor
telephone support.

Maybe if Dell reduced there operating costs by eliminating the huge waiting
times talking to India for support they could spend more on quality support
techs who can answer the questions.


"Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in message
news:JOadncli69hai0DfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
> Bill wrote:
>> Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
>> us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
>> profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
>> in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
>> who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>>
>> If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
>> once famous support, it would still be provided.
>>
>> My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
>> tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
>> offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
>> to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
>> support quality any where.
>
> Warranty is a contract and the issues seem to be that Dell is having some
> difficulty honoring the terms of whatever warranties are in force, for
> whatever reason Dell has. Possible reasons are low product profit margins
> coupled with any or all of deteriorating product quality, increasing
> consumer expectations of performance, high level of product returns, etc.
> Dell is also having to go the extra mile in coupons, discounts, freebies,
> and the like in order to maintain both product volume sales and total
> revenues in a market with falling product prices, intense competition, and
> falling numbers of new computer purchases.
>
> I fail to see where the customer's choice of warranty model has any impact
> on Dell's warranty service and support obligations.
>
> Q
>
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 1:12:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Al" <dvst8@videotron.ca> wrote in message
news:C%WEe.19508$mv2.230410@weber.videotron.net...
> Not only that, if you pay the premium for CompleteCare, you still get poor
> telephone support.

Not universally true. See my previous posts.

> Maybe if Dell reduced there operating costs by eliminating the huge
> waiting times talking to India for support they could spend more on
> quality support techs who can answer the questions.


Don't know, but I suspect that they are making money even with the "huge
waiting times" you present. Apparently I've been fortunate. I've never had
to wait beyond 15 minutes for a tech to pick up either domestically or
overseas.


Stew
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 5:39:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

What operating costs would they eliminate? The connections are all VOIP, so
essentially free calls.


"Al" <dvst8@videotron.ca> wrote in message
news:C%WEe.19508$mv2.230410@weber.videotron.net...
> Not only that, if you pay the premium for CompleteCare, you still get poor
> telephone support.
>
> Maybe if Dell reduced there operating costs by eliminating the huge
> waiting times talking to India for support they could spend more on
> quality support techs who can answer the questions.
>
>
> "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in message
> news:JOadncli69hai0DfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
>> Bill wrote:
>>> Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
>>> us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
>>> profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
>>> in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
>>> who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>>>
>>> If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
>>> once famous support, it would still be provided.
>>>
>>> My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
>>> tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
>>> offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
>>> to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
>>> support quality any where.
>>
>> Warranty is a contract and the issues seem to be that Dell is having some
>> difficulty honoring the terms of whatever warranties are in force, for
>> whatever reason Dell has. Possible reasons are low product profit
>> margins coupled with any or all of deteriorating product quality,
>> increasing consumer expectations of performance, high level of product
>> returns, etc. Dell is also having to go the extra mile in coupons,
>> discounts, freebies, and the like in order to maintain both product
>> volume sales and total revenues in a market with falling product prices,
>> intense competition, and falling numbers of new computer purchases.
>>
>> I fail to see where the customer's choice of warranty model has any
>> impact on Dell's warranty service and support obligations.
>>
>> Q
>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 10:07:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I've posted this several times before, but at the risk of being flamed I
will repeat my comments again.

When enough people get fed up with the poor support and quit buying Dell
computers, things will improve. Until then, it is my opinion that things
will continue deteriorate as long as Dell can cut service and support
without the loss of substantial business.

That point has apparently already been reached on the "business" sales end
of things and some service and support has been moved back to the U.S. and
improved.

Bottom line(no pun intended), as long as Dell can sell their low end
consumer computers, without providing the quality service and support that
most of us got used to several years ago, they will do so.


"Al" <dvst8@videotron.ca> wrote in message
news:C%WEe.19508$mv2.230410@weber.videotron.net...
> Not only that, if you pay the premium for CompleteCare, you still get poor
> telephone support.
>
> Maybe if Dell reduced there operating costs by eliminating the huge
> waiting times talking to India for support they could spend more on
> quality support techs who can answer the questions.
>
>
> "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in message
> news:JOadncli69hai0DfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
>> Bill wrote:
>>> Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
>>> us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
>>> profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
>>> in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
>>> who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>>>
>>> If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
>>> once famous support, it would still be provided.
>>>
>>> My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
>>> tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
>>> offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
>>> to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
>>> support quality any where.
>>
>> Warranty is a contract and the issues seem to be that Dell is having some
>> difficulty honoring the terms of whatever warranties are in force, for
>> whatever reason Dell has. Possible reasons are low product profit
>> margins coupled with any or all of deteriorating product quality,
>> increasing consumer expectations of performance, high level of product
>> returns, etc. Dell is also having to go the extra mile in coupons,
>> discounts, freebies, and the like in order to maintain both product
>> volume sales and total revenues in a market with falling product prices,
>> intense competition, and falling numbers of new computer purchases.
>>
>> I fail to see where the customer's choice of warranty model has any
>> impact on Dell's warranty service and support obligations.
>>
>> Q
>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 5:38:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

No flames from here, Irene. Whether Dell or any other name brand computer, it
has long been painfully obvious that computers are divided into two classes of
equipment: commercial (or business) and consumer. The consumer-oriented brand
names (Compaq Presario, HP Pavilion, Dell Inspiron, etc.) have long been
associated with inferior product, beginning with the design, including the
selection of electronic components (e.g. Quantum Bigfoot drives, "Gatrox" PCI
graphics cards) and even chassis, and ending with support (all areas including
warranty replacements, web site info, on-line and phone tech support). The
computer companies find that a divide-and-conquer strategy works perfectly with
consumers, who, by their very nature, are already divided, and, hence, cannot
easily get together on any problems with the products. Divide-and-conquer does
not work with large enterprises with centralized purchasing departments, so
product quality is invariably at least a notch better with business-class
products.

Give IBM credit for first dropping out of the consumer computer product game
(Aptivas were a blot on IBM's reputation), then for selling off the desktop
computer business to Lenovo. IBM simply concluded that competing in the
consumer-oriented product segment with ever-lower quality products was a losing
game for a reputation it wants to maintain.

Dell seems to be late in catching on that it can cut corners with its
consumer-oriented computers, along with commeasurate cuts in price. Dell also
shows evidence that it understands the difference between the two: consumer and
business. It's web site exhibits a two-tiered structure, so that one can order
products as a simpleton consumer (DON'T DO IT!) or a some sort of business.
And, yes, Dell is too damned short-sighted to understand the long-term effects
of cutting corners with consumers. The short-term effect is that Dell
consumer-oriented boxes will be perceived as the same as all the junk sold in
the retail stores. The long-term effect is a steady erosion in sales, or at
least no increases in sales to satisfy the demands of the stock market.

The only hope for Dell is that HP and Gateway have been going down the slippery
consumer slope for several years already, and consequently both are really and
truly gasping to survive. Kill off HP and Gateway computer businesses and who
is left to compete with Dell? This is a real conundrum for buyers of computers,
until computer manufacturers and buyers alike truly understand that price is not
the only buying criterion... Ben Myers

On , "Irene" <girlsrule@hotmail.com> wrote:

>
>NNTP-Posting-Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2005 06:07:17 MST
>Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2005 06:07:15 -0700
>Xref: Hurricane-Charley alt.sys.pc-clone.dell:39577
>X-Received-Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2005 06:07:17 MST (be04.lga)
>
>I've posted this several times before, but at the risk of being flamed I
>will repeat my comments again.
>
>When enough people get fed up with the poor support and quit buying Dell
>computers, things will improve. Until then, it is my opinion that things
>will continue deteriorate as long as Dell can cut service and support
>without the loss of substantial business.
>
>That point has apparently already been reached on the "business" sales end
>of things and some service and support has been moved back to the U.S. and
>improved.
>
>Bottom line(no pun intended), as long as Dell can sell their low end
>consumer computers, without providing the quality service and support that
>most of us got used to several years ago, they will do so.
>
>
>"Al" <dvst8@videotron.ca> wrote in message
>news:C%WEe.19508$mv2.230410@weber.videotron.net...
>> Not only that, if you pay the premium for CompleteCare, you still get poor
>> telephone support.
>>
>> Maybe if Dell reduced there operating costs by eliminating the huge
>> waiting times talking to India for support they could spend more on
>> quality support techs who can answer the questions.
>>
>>
>> "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in message
>> news:JOadncli69hai0DfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
>>> Bill wrote:
>>>> Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
>>>> us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
>>>> profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
>>>> in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
>>>> who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>>>>
>>>> If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
>>>> once famous support, it would still be provided.
>>>>
>>>> My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
>>>> tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
>>>> offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
>>>> to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
>>>> support quality any where.
>>>
>>> Warranty is a contract and the issues seem to be that Dell is having some
>>> difficulty honoring the terms of whatever warranties are in force, for
>>> whatever reason Dell has. Possible reasons are low product profit
>>> margins coupled with any or all of deteriorating product quality,
>>> increasing consumer expectations of performance, high level of product
>>> returns, etc. Dell is also having to go the extra mile in coupons,
>>> discounts, freebies, and the like in order to maintain both product
>>> volume sales and total revenues in a market with falling product prices,
>>> intense competition, and falling numbers of new computer purchases.
>>>
>>> I fail to see where the customer's choice of warranty model has any
>>> impact on Dell's warranty service and support obligations.
>>>
>>> Q
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 5:38:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Couldn't have said it better myself.
Now we all have to do is wait for Dell to realize that in the long run, this
nonsense is going to cost them customers and ultimately profits.


<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:42e4e724.1997027@nntp.charter.net...
> No flames from here, Irene. Whether Dell or any other name brand
> computer, it
> has long been painfully obvious that computers are divided into two
> classes of
> equipment: commercial (or business) and consumer. The consumer-oriented
> brand
> names (Compaq Presario, HP Pavilion, Dell Inspiron, etc.) have long been
> associated with inferior product, beginning with the design, including the
> selection of electronic components (e.g. Quantum Bigfoot drives, "Gatrox"
> PCI
> graphics cards) and even chassis, and ending with support (all areas
> including
> warranty replacements, web site info, on-line and phone tech support).
> The
> computer companies find that a divide-and-conquer strategy works perfectly
> with
> consumers, who, by their very nature, are already divided, and, hence,
> cannot
> easily get together on any problems with the products. Divide-and-conquer
> does
> not work with large enterprises with centralized purchasing departments,
> so
> product quality is invariably at least a notch better with business-class
> products.
>
> Give IBM credit for first dropping out of the consumer computer product
> game
> (Aptivas were a blot on IBM's reputation), then for selling off the
> desktop
> computer business to Lenovo. IBM simply concluded that competing in the
> consumer-oriented product segment with ever-lower quality products was a
> losing
> game for a reputation it wants to maintain.
>
> Dell seems to be late in catching on that it can cut corners with its
> consumer-oriented computers, along with commeasurate cuts in price. Dell
> also
> shows evidence that it understands the difference between the two:
> consumer and
> business. It's web site exhibits a two-tiered structure, so that one can
> order
> products as a simpleton consumer (DON'T DO IT!) or a some sort of
> business.
> And, yes, Dell is too damned short-sighted to understand the long-term
> effects
> of cutting corners with consumers. The short-term effect is that Dell
> consumer-oriented boxes will be perceived as the same as all the junk sold
> in
> the retail stores. The long-term effect is a steady erosion in sales, or
> at
> least no increases in sales to satisfy the demands of the stock market.
>
> The only hope for Dell is that HP and Gateway have been going down the
> slippery
> consumer slope for several years already, and consequently both are really
> and
> truly gasping to survive. Kill off HP and Gateway computer businesses and
> who
> is left to compete with Dell? This is a real conundrum for buyers of
> computers,
> until computer manufacturers and buyers alike truly understand that price
> is not
> the only buying criterion... Ben Myers
>
> On , "Irene" <girlsrule@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>
>>NNTP-Posting-Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2005 06:07:17 MST
>>Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2005 06:07:15 -0700
>>Xref: Hurricane-Charley alt.sys.pc-clone.dell:39577
>>X-Received-Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2005 06:07:17 MST (be04.lga)
>>
>>I've posted this several times before, but at the risk of being flamed I
>>will repeat my comments again.
>>
>>When enough people get fed up with the poor support and quit buying Dell
>>computers, things will improve. Until then, it is my opinion that things
>>will continue deteriorate as long as Dell can cut service and support
>>without the loss of substantial business.
>>
>>That point has apparently already been reached on the "business" sales end
>>of things and some service and support has been moved back to the U.S. and
>>improved.
>>
>>Bottom line(no pun intended), as long as Dell can sell their low end
>>consumer computers, without providing the quality service and support that
>>most of us got used to several years ago, they will do so.
>>
>>
>>"Al" <dvst8@videotron.ca> wrote in message
>>news:C%WEe.19508$mv2.230410@weber.videotron.net...
>>> Not only that, if you pay the premium for CompleteCare, you still get
>>> poor
>>> telephone support.
>>>
>>> Maybe if Dell reduced there operating costs by eliminating the huge
>>> waiting times talking to India for support they could spend more on
>>> quality support techs who can answer the questions.
>>>
>>>
>>> "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in message
>>> news:JOadncli69hai0DfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
>>>> Bill wrote:
>>>>> Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
>>>>> us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
>>>>> profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
>>>>> in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
>>>>> who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>>>>>
>>>>> If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
>>>>> once famous support, it would still be provided.
>>>>>
>>>>> My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
>>>>> tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
>>>>> offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
>>>>> to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
>>>>> support quality any where.
>>>>
>>>> Warranty is a contract and the issues seem to be that Dell is having
>>>> some
>>>> difficulty honoring the terms of whatever warranties are in force, for
>>>> whatever reason Dell has. Possible reasons are low product profit
>>>> margins coupled with any or all of deteriorating product quality,
>>>> increasing consumer expectations of performance, high level of product
>>>> returns, etc. Dell is also having to go the extra mile in coupons,
>>>> discounts, freebies, and the like in order to maintain both product
>>>> volume sales and total revenues in a market with falling product
>>>> prices,
>>>> intense competition, and falling numbers of new computer purchases.
>>>>
>>>> I fail to see where the customer's choice of warranty model has any
>>>> impact on Dell's warranty service and support obligations.
>>>>
>>>> Q
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 5:38:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:42e4e724.1997027@nntp.charter.net...
> No flames from here, Irene. Whether Dell or any other name brand
> computer, it
> has long been painfully obvious that computers are divided into two
> classes of
> equipment: commercial (or business) and consumer. The consumer-oriented
> brand
> names (Compaq Presario, HP Pavilion, Dell Inspiron, etc.) have long been
> associated with inferior product, beginning with the design, including the
> selection of electronic components (e.g. Quantum Bigfoot drives, "Gatrox"
> PCI
> graphics cards) and even chassis, and ending with support (all areas
> including
> warranty replacements, web site info, on-line and phone tech support).
> The
> computer companies find that a divide-and-conquer strategy works perfectly
> with
> consumers, who, by their very nature, are already divided, and, hence,
> cannot
> easily get together on any problems with the products. Divide-and-conquer
> does
> not work with large enterprises with centralized purchasing departments,
> so
> product quality is invariably at least a notch better with business-class
> products.
>
> Give IBM credit for first dropping out of the consumer computer product
> game
> (Aptivas were a blot on IBM's reputation), then for selling off the
> desktop
> computer business to Lenovo. IBM simply concluded that competing in the
> consumer-oriented product segment with ever-lower quality products was a
> losing
> game for a reputation it wants to maintain.
>
> Dell seems to be late in catching on that it can cut corners with its
> consumer-oriented computers, along with commeasurate cuts in price. Dell
> also
> shows evidence that it understands the difference between the two:
> consumer and
> business. It's web site exhibits a two-tiered structure, so that one can
> order
> products as a simpleton consumer (DON'T DO IT!) or a some sort of
> business.
> And, yes, Dell is too damned short-sighted to understand the long-term
> effects
> of cutting corners with consumers. The short-term effect is that Dell
> consumer-oriented boxes will be perceived as the same as all the junk sold
> in
> the retail stores. The long-term effect is a steady erosion in sales, or
> at
> least no increases in sales to satisfy the demands of the stock market.
>
> The only hope for Dell is that HP and Gateway have been going down the
> slippery
> consumer slope for several years already, and consequently both are really
> and
> truly gasping to survive. Kill off HP and Gateway computer businesses and
> who
> is left to compete with Dell? This is a real conundrum for buyers of
> computers,
> until computer manufacturers and buyers alike truly understand that price
> is not
> the only buying criterion... Ben Myers
>


The only way the OEM cycle is going to be broken (imo) would be the
emergence of a significant regional (who goes national) vendor(s) who could
shake the consumer psychology of buying upon price alone.

Said vendor(s) would have to be near the OEMs in price but provide some
demonstrable - and in fact incredible - product quality AND customer support
that could capture the imaginations and loyalties of PC buyers in both the
consumer and corporate sectors. I'm talking "catching lightning in a bottle"
types of events here.

Quite frankly, I just don't see how this can happen. Buyers have become
'addicted' in their expectation of a sub $1000 system, or even a sub-$500
system (with MONITOR) for entry-level hardware with OS.

It's one thing to demand improved product quality and support and quite
another to pay $300 more (and up) for it on a comparably spec'd machine.
Most people would rather spend that extra money on something else.

The way I see it, OEM quality and support would have to get ridiculously bad
for volumes of buyers to abandon ship, and I think the big corporates are
too smart to let that happen. This is a very controlled level of (a least
support) degradation, I think. I think they all know *exactly* what they're
doing, and they're monitoring the customer sales impact very closely.

(Again, note Dell's very quick response to return corporate support to
domestic centers....)

I suppose if perceived quality (tied to price) were everything, then
Alienware and FalconNW would now be major players.


Stew
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 5:38:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

The only problem with your rational is that the sorry support and service
extends very nearly throughout the Dell consumer line up. So, it matters
not if one spends $400 or $2000 for a Home division computer, you get the
same deteriorating quality of service and support.

"S.Lewis" <stew1960@mail.com> wrote in message
news:IO8Fe.157$h.27@bignews6.bellsouth.net...
>
> <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
> news:42e4e724.1997027@nntp.charter.net...
>> No flames from here, Irene. Whether Dell or any other name brand
>> computer, it
>> has long been painfully obvious that computers are divided into two
>> classes of
>> equipment: commercial (or business) and consumer. The consumer-oriented
>> brand
>> names (Compaq Presario, HP Pavilion, Dell Inspiron, etc.) have long been
>> associated with inferior product, beginning with the design, including
>> the
>> selection of electronic components (e.g. Quantum Bigfoot drives, "Gatrox"
>> PCI
>> graphics cards) and even chassis, and ending with support (all areas
>> including
>> warranty replacements, web site info, on-line and phone tech support).
>> The
>> computer companies find that a divide-and-conquer strategy works
>> perfectly with
>> consumers, who, by their very nature, are already divided, and, hence,
>> cannot
>> easily get together on any problems with the products.
>> Divide-and-conquer does
>> not work with large enterprises with centralized purchasing departments,
>> so
>> product quality is invariably at least a notch better with business-class
>> products.
>>
>> Give IBM credit for first dropping out of the consumer computer product
>> game
>> (Aptivas were a blot on IBM's reputation), then for selling off the
>> desktop
>> computer business to Lenovo. IBM simply concluded that competing in the
>> consumer-oriented product segment with ever-lower quality products was a
>> losing
>> game for a reputation it wants to maintain.
>>
>> Dell seems to be late in catching on that it can cut corners with its
>> consumer-oriented computers, along with commeasurate cuts in price. Dell
>> also
>> shows evidence that it understands the difference between the two:
>> consumer and
>> business. It's web site exhibits a two-tiered structure, so that one can
>> order
>> products as a simpleton consumer (DON'T DO IT!) or a some sort of
>> business.
>> And, yes, Dell is too damned short-sighted to understand the long-term
>> effects
>> of cutting corners with consumers. The short-term effect is that Dell
>> consumer-oriented boxes will be perceived as the same as all the junk
>> sold in
>> the retail stores. The long-term effect is a steady erosion in sales, or
>> at
>> least no increases in sales to satisfy the demands of the stock market.
>>
>> The only hope for Dell is that HP and Gateway have been going down the
>> slippery
>> consumer slope for several years already, and consequently both are
>> really and
>> truly gasping to survive. Kill off HP and Gateway computer businesses
>> and who
>> is left to compete with Dell? This is a real conundrum for buyers of
>> computers,
>> until computer manufacturers and buyers alike truly understand that price
>> is not
>> the only buying criterion... Ben Myers
>>
>
>
> The only way the OEM cycle is going to be broken (imo) would be the
> emergence of a significant regional (who goes national) vendor(s) who
> could shake the consumer psychology of buying upon price alone.
>
> Said vendor(s) would have to be near the OEMs in price but provide some
> demonstrable - and in fact incredible - product quality AND customer
> support that could capture the imaginations and loyalties of PC buyers in
> both the consumer and corporate sectors. I'm talking "catching lightning
> in a bottle" types of events here.
>
> Quite frankly, I just don't see how this can happen. Buyers have become
> 'addicted' in their expectation of a sub $1000 system, or even a sub-$500
> system (with MONITOR) for entry-level hardware with OS.
>
> It's one thing to demand improved product quality and support and quite
> another to pay $300 more (and up) for it on a comparably spec'd machine.
> Most people would rather spend that extra money on something else.
>
> The way I see it, OEM quality and support would have to get ridiculously
> bad for volumes of buyers to abandon ship, and I think the big corporates
> are too smart to let that happen. This is a very controlled level of (a
> least support) degradation, I think. I think they all know *exactly* what
> they're doing, and they're monitoring the customer sales impact very
> closely.
>
> (Again, note Dell's very quick response to return corporate support to
> domestic centers....)
>
> I suppose if perceived quality (tied to price) were everything, then
> Alienware and FalconNW would now be major players.
>
>
> Stew
>
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 12:23:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Dell has a new line of computers coming out this fall offering superior
service . I am willing to bet most people will not want to pay extra for
good service.

Dell to launch 'Lexus lineup' of PCs

The premium systems will also come with a premium service package, which
Dell calls its "white glove" treatment. The service packages will include
expanded online and in-home support. Dell is currently conducting extensive
test programs on its online support.
July 26, 2005 3:30:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

God help anyone who buys a product which touts a special support treatment
or queue.

Dell can not figure out how to route you to the right queue if your system
is considered "special" (eg. XPS), and the wrong queues refuse to do
anything (including letting you speak to a manager) but tranfer you,
usually again to the wrong queue.

"Tom Morton" <tommortonspam@adelphiaspam.net> wrote in message
news:tr-dnSIt_NEZH3jfRVn-oA@adelphia.com...
> Dell has a new line of computers coming out this fall offering superior
> service . I am willing to bet most people will not want to pay extra for
> good service.
>
> Dell to launch 'Lexus lineup' of PCs
>
> The premium systems will also come with a premium service package, which
> Dell calls its "white glove" treatment. The service packages will include
> expanded online and in-home support. Dell is currently conducting
> extensive test programs on its online support.
>
>
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 5:06:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Al wrote:
>
> God help anyone who buys a product which touts a special support treatment
> or queue.
>
> Dell can not figure out how to route you to the right queue if your system
> is considered "special" (eg. XPS), and the wrong queues refuse to do
> anything (including letting you speak to a manager) but tranfer you,
> usually again to the wrong queue.

Gold Tech Support has its own number... Doesn't XPS?

Notan
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 9:27:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Notan wrote:
> Al wrote:
>
>>God help anyone who buys a product which touts a special support treatment
>>or queue.
>>
>>Dell can not figure out how to route you to the right queue if your system
>>is considered "special" (eg. XPS), and the wrong queues refuse to do
>>anything (including letting you speak to a manager) but tranfer you,
>>usually again to the wrong queue.
>
>
> Gold Tech Support has its own number... Doesn't XPS?
>
> Notan

If it XPS does, I haven't been able to find it yet. I haven't had
problems with my XPS Laptop and hope I don't with the new XPS Generation
5 I just ordered.

Joan
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 9:28:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Joan Hansen wrote:
>
> Notan wrote:
> > Al wrote:
> >
> >>God help anyone who buys a product which touts a special support treatment
> >>or queue.
> >>
> >>Dell can not figure out how to route you to the right queue if your system
> >>is considered "special" (eg. XPS), and the wrong queues refuse to do
> >>anything (including letting you speak to a manager) but tranfer you,
> >>usually again to the wrong queue.
> >
> >
> > Gold Tech Support has its own number... Doesn't XPS?
> >
> > Notan
>
> If it XPS does, I haven't been able to find it yet. I haven't had
> problems with my XPS Laptop and hope I don't with the new XPS Generation
> 5 I just ordered.

When I purchased GTS, I had to make a phone call, to my sales rep,
in order to get the direct number.

I'm *sure* I remember reading that XPS purchasers would be given a
special Support number.

Notan
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 1:06:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Notan wrote:
> Joan Hansen wrote:
>
>>Notan wrote:
>>
>>>Al wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>God help anyone who buys a product which touts a special support treatment
>>>>or queue.
>>>>
>>>>Dell can not figure out how to route you to the right queue if your system
>>>>is considered "special" (eg. XPS), and the wrong queues refuse to do
>>>>anything (including letting you speak to a manager) but tranfer you,
>>>>usually again to the wrong queue.
>>>
>>>
>>>Gold Tech Support has its own number... Doesn't XPS?
>>>
>>>Notan
>>
>>If it XPS does, I haven't been able to find it yet. I haven't had
>>problems with my XPS Laptop and hope I don't with the new XPS Generation
>>5 I just ordered.
>
>
> When I purchased GTS, I had to make a phone call, to my sales rep,
> in order to get the direct number.
>
> I'm *sure* I remember reading that XPS purchasers would be given a
> special Support number.
>
> Notan

Thanks Notan, I'll pull out my documents to see if they have the phone
number, although, I'd rather not have to use it. :-)

Joan
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 11:22:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

What's the phone number for Gold Support? I can't find it anywhere

--
Cyndi
"Notan" <notan@ddress.com> wrote in message news:42E689A9.9E129EC3@ddress.com...
> Al wrote:
> >
> > God help anyone who buys a product which touts a special support treatment
> > or queue.
> >
> > Dell can not figure out how to route you to the right queue if your system
> > is considered "special" (eg. XPS), and the wrong queues refuse to do
> > anything (including letting you speak to a manager) but tranfer you,
> > usually again to the wrong queue.
>
> Gold Tech Support has its own number... Doesn't XPS?
>
> Notan
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 1:20:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Cyndi wrote:
>
> What's the phone number for Gold Support? I can't find it anywhere

It's supplied when you purchase it...

Just an FYI... Calling the number won't *get* you GTS... Your Service Tag
or Express Service Code has to match the records in their GTS database.
Otherwise, you're politely transferred to another department. Maybe even
another country! <g>

Notan
Anonymous
July 30, 2005 5:08:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I have the Gold Tech Support, I just never found a number for it.
--
Cyndi
"Notan" <notan@ddress.com> wrote in message news:42E84EF5.28BDA14@ddress.com...
> Cyndi wrote:
> >
> > What's the phone number for Gold Support? I can't find it anywhere
>
> It's supplied when you purchase it...
>
> Just an FYI... Calling the number won't *get* you GTS... Your Service Tag
> or Express Service Code has to match the records in their GTS database.
> Otherwise, you're politely transferred to another department. Maybe even
> another country! <g>
>
> Notan
Anonymous
July 30, 2005 9:23:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Cyndi wrote:
>
> I have the Gold Tech Support, I just never found a number for it.
>
> <snip>

If you'll post a legit e-mail address, I'll send it to you.

Notan
July 30, 2005 10:46:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Well supposedly the Express Service Tag will transfer you to the right
queue, but doesn't.

I was given a "special" number, which used to end you up in the same mixed
up process.
Now it doesn't even do that. Now you get, this number is no longer in
service, please hang up and call
1-800-999-3355.

Big help there.

Al

"Notan" <notan@ddress.com> wrote in message
news:42E6ACDC.119D85AB@ddress.com...
> Joan Hansen wrote:
>>
>> Notan wrote:
>> > Al wrote:
>> >
>> >>God help anyone who buys a product which touts a special support
>> >>treatment
>> >>or queue.
>> >>
>> >>Dell can not figure out how to route you to the right queue if your
>> >>system
>> >>is considered "special" (eg. XPS), and the wrong queues refuse to do
>> >>anything (including letting you speak to a manager) but tranfer you,
>> >>usually again to the wrong queue.
>> >
>> >
>> > Gold Tech Support has its own number... Doesn't XPS?
>> >
>> > Notan
>>
>> If it XPS does, I haven't been able to find it yet. I haven't had
>> problems with my XPS Laptop and hope I don't with the new XPS Generation
>> 5 I just ordered.
>
> When I purchased GTS, I had to make a phone call, to my sales rep,
> in order to get the direct number.
>
> I'm *sure* I remember reading that XPS purchasers would be given a
> special Support number.
>
> Notan
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 4:18:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I recently purchased from Dell for the first time. I purchased a 2 year
extended warrantee and paid additional for the 2 years of complete care.
My laptop came and wouldn't even turn on. It took me 2 and a half hours
on the phone (between being put on hold and shifted from department to
department just to exchange my dead system. Asking to speak to a
supervisor gets you nowhere because either the supervisor won't tell you
anything either or they won't let you talk to them anyway.

I was recently informed that the only people who get support within the US
from Dell is corporate and government. (This was from someone within Dell
that my brother does business with on the government end).

I finally recieved my system replacement on Friday and it is working fine
so far, but honestly I can tell you that I don't feel very confident about
the quality of the warrantee support.
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 4:18:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

nhkat2 wrote:
>
> I recently purchased from Dell for the first time. I purchased a 2 year
> extended warrantee and paid additional for the 2 years of complete care.
> My laptop came and wouldn't even turn on. It took me 2 and a half hours
> on the phone (between being put on hold and shifted from department to
> department just to exchange my dead system. Asking to speak to a
> supervisor gets you nowhere because either the supervisor won't tell you
> anything either or they won't let you talk to them anyway.
>
> I was recently informed that the only people who get support within the US
> from Dell is corporate and government. (This was from someone within Dell
> that my brother does business with on the government end).

You were informed incorrectly.

If you purchase from Dell's Small Business Division, you have the option
of obtaining US support (Gold Tech Support).

I've heard that Home buyers can also get GTS, by asking, but I couldn't
verify this, personally.

Notan
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 12:46:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 08:28:00 -0500, Bill <bgross@nospan.airmail.net>
wrote:

>Want to know who is responsible for the slide in Dell's service? It's
>us, the customer. Dell is driven, like any other corporation by
>profit. How many customers really are willing to pay the difference
>in price for better tech support? Consider that number versus those
>who would buy Brand X if it were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper?
>
>If the market really wanted and paid that extra few bucks for Dell's
>once famous support, it would still be provided.
>
>My take on this is, Dell sees no value and perhaps a loss in its old
>tradition. Perhaps I'm out in left field. As long as now one else
>offers better support and a certain segment of the market is willing
>to chase a few extra bucks in savings we aren't going to see tech
>support quality any where.


I don't much care how much my computers cost; I have work to do, so I
just want quality, reliability, and support. That's why I used to buy
Dell.

John
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 10:07:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

John,

Just so we're all on the same page...

Are you buying the Optiplex/Precision managed desktops?

T.
Anonymous
August 10, 2005 1:00:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

The default support for the managed desktops should be local US phone
support.

If he's not happy, he has a case.

T.
Anonymous
August 10, 2005 2:10:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

tlai909@visto.com wrote:
>
> The default support for the managed desktops should be local US phone
> support.
>
> If he's not happy, he has a case.

Should be? In my opinion, *all* US purchases *should be* US supported.

But, the reality is they're not.

Dell offers numerous options, which *will* guarantee US support.
Purchasing better support is no different than purchasing auto
insurance. You can get nothing, basic, or top-of-the-line. It's
rather amusing to hear people bitch about bad service, after
*they've* made a bad (i.e., "cheap") choice.

And, for you, Administrator, that was a Typical Dellbot Response.

Notan
Anonymous
August 10, 2005 9:46:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<tlai909@visto.com> wrote in message
news:1123646448.508056.312370@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> The default support for the managed desktops should be local US phone
> support.
>
> If he's not happy, he has a case.
>
> T.
>

Don't know, but I'd suspect default support for the Precision boxes is U.S..
It most definitely is for Latitude notebooks......
Anonymous
August 10, 2005 5:04:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

tlai909@visto.com wrote:

> The default support for the managed desktops should be local US phone
> support.

Really, where's that written down?
!