Buying Dell memory upgrades in Oz

Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

G'day mates,

Thinking of getting a bit more memory for my old Dell Dimension 4100.

Anyone heard of, or had experience with, this mob:

http://www.upgradeable.com.au/ ??

They claim to be the bee's knees for memory upgrades, so I would be
interested in knowledgeable comments, please. Anyone with good/bad
experience? [They sound okay to me (apart from the price); and free
supply by Oz Post Express has got to be one up on all the dickheads
who insist on using friggin' couriers! -- It seems too many Oz
businesses just don't have a bloody clue!]

They're offering the 256MB module for AUD108 -- which is actually a
rip-off compared with Yankee prices of ca. USD60 (ca. AUD80); but I
haven't noticed a supplier here that's much cheaper anyway. :-(

Cheers, Phred.

--
ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
9 answers Last reply
More about buying dell memory upgrades
  1. Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    This link shows you the compatible RAM from Kingston (I think it is a
    PC133 SDRAM)

    http://www.ec.kingston.com/ecom/configurator/modelsinfo.asp?SysID=9468&mfr=Dell&model=Dimension+4100+Series&Sys=9468-Dell-Dimension+4100+Series&distributor=0&submit1=Search

    Try to do a search on eBay, they are going for ~$70 I think, don't quote
    me on this ;)
  2. Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Phred" <ppnerkDELETETHIS@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:3kf1f1Fu5lioU1@individual.net...
    > G'day mates,
    >
    > Thinking of getting a bit more memory for my old Dell Dimension 4100.
    >
    > Anyone heard of, or had experience with, this mob:
    >
    > http://www.upgradeable.com.au/ ??
    >
    > They claim to be the bee's knees for memory upgrades, so I would be
    > interested in knowledgeable comments, please. Anyone with good/bad
    > experience? [They sound okay to me (apart from the price); and free
    > supply by Oz Post Express has got to be one up on all the dickheads
    > who insist on using friggin' couriers! -- It seems too many Oz
    > businesses just don't have a bloody clue!]
    >
    > They're offering the 256MB module for AUD108 -- which is actually a
    > rip-off compared with Yankee prices of ca. USD60 (ca. AUD80); but I
    > haven't noticed a supplier here that's much cheaper anyway. :-(
    >

    Any comptaible RAM will do. Check the manual for the memory type, eg PC2700
    DDR then shop around.
    As a guide I just bought 1GB for $140.
  3. Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Uncle Bully" <wakeupcall@optushome.com.au.Remove> wrote in message
    news:42e25f26$0$3275$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...

    > Any comptaible RAM will do. Check the manual for the memory type, eg
    > PC2700 DDR then shop around.
    > As a guide I just bought 1GB for $140.

    Not all . Some Dell board is crazy enough to use diff type of RAM. Well ..
    either that ram slot is stuffed or the earlier applies.

    =bob=
  4. Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Not quite. Dell motherboards do not use crazy memory. Just as with any other
    name brand, there are specifications as to the type of memory required, but I
    have not yet run into a Dell motherboard specification that does not require
    some kind of standard memory. The days are long past when a name brand company
    can afford to have both motherboard and memory designed to meet a proprietary
    standard. All one needs to do is to read the specifications and buy memory that
    meets the spec.

    In the case of a Dell Dimension 4100, common vanilla PC133 non-parity 168-pin
    DIMMs will suffice. To err in favor of greater success, memory with low-density
    chips (i.e. more chips per DIMM) should be used.

    As a rule, Dell servers require some sort of ECC memory. Dell systems with
    RAMBUS memory require certain minimum speeds, and some require ECC RAMBUS.
    Dimension systems which use DDR memory require memory of a minimum speed. And
    so it goes... Ben Myers

    On Sun, 24 Jul 2005 07:31:29 +1000, "[BnH]" <b18[at]ii[dot]net> wrote:

    >
    >"Uncle Bully" <wakeupcall@optushome.com.au.Remove> wrote in message
    >news:42e25f26$0$3275$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
    >
    >> Any comptaible RAM will do. Check the manual for the memory type, eg
    >> PC2700 DDR then shop around.
    >> As a guide I just bought 1GB for $140.
    >
    >Not all . Some Dell board is crazy enough to use diff type of RAM. Well ..
    >either that ram slot is stuffed or the earlier applies.
    >
    >=bob=
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    In article <42e2c1ec.32911533@nntp.charter.net>, ben_myers_spam_me_not
    at charter.net wrote:
    >On 24 Jul 2005 07:31:29 +1000, "[BnH]" <b18[at]ii[dot]net> wrote:
    >>"Uncle Bully" <wakeupcall@optushome.com.au.Remove> wrote in message
    >>news:42e25f26$0$3275$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
    >>
    >>> Any comptaible RAM will do. Check the manual for the memory type,
    >>> eg PC2700 DDR then shop around.
    >>> As a guide I just bought 1GB for $140.
    >>
    >>Not all . Some Dell board is crazy enough to use diff type of RAM.
    >>Well... either that ram slot is stuffed or the earlier applies.
    >
    >Not quite. Dell motherboards do not use crazy memory. Just as with any other
    >name brand, there are specifications as to the type of memory required, but I
    >have not yet run into a Dell motherboard specification that does not require
    >some kind of standard memory. The days are long past when a name brand company
    >can afford to have both motherboard and memory designed to meet a proprietary
    >standard. All one needs to do is to read the specifications and buy memory
    > that meets the spec.
    >
    >In the case of a Dell Dimension 4100, common vanilla PC133 non-parity 168-pin
    >DIMMs will suffice. To err in favor of greater success, memory with
    > low-density chips (i.e. more chips per DIMM) should be used.

    Yeah. That "low-density" specification for the 4100 is the thing that
    threw me on just buying vanilla PC133 off the web as I couldn't find
    reliable info on how to identify "low-density". [And a note for Uncle
    Bully: Thanks for your interest, but the 4100 will only go to a max
    of 512 MB fitted as 2*256.]

    >As a rule, Dell servers require some sort of ECC memory. Dell systems with
    >RAMBUS memory require certain minimum speeds, and some require ECC RAMBUS.
    >Dimension systems which use DDR memory require memory of a minimum speed. And
    >so it goes... Ben Myers

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
  6. Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 14:12:10 GMT, Phred <ppnerkDELETETHIS@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > G'day mates,
    >
    > Thinking of getting a bit more memory for my old Dell Dimension 4100.
    >
    > Anyone heard of, or had experience with, this mob:
    >
    > http://www.upgradeable.com.au/ ??
    >


    I bought 512 MB of ram for my Dimension 2350(now I have 768 Mb) only about
    3 weeks ago from
    upgradeable.com.au for $108. Delivery was very quick, and the memory has
    worked flawlessly.

    I'll be using them again to upgrade memory in the future.

    Buck
  7. Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Phred" <ppnerkDELETETHIS@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:3khdggFueunbU1@individual.net...
    > In article <42e2c1ec.32911533@nntp.charter.net>, ben_myers_spam_me_not
    > at charter.net wrote:
    >>On 24 Jul 2005 07:31:29 +1000, "[BnH]" <b18[at]ii[dot]net> wrote:
    >>>"Uncle Bully" <wakeupcall@optushome.com.au.Remove> wrote in message
    >>>news:42e25f26$0$3275$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
    >>>
    >>>> Any comptaible RAM will do. Check the manual for the memory type,
    >>>> eg PC2700 DDR then shop around.
    >>>> As a guide I just bought 1GB for $140.
    >>>
    >>>Not all . Some Dell board is crazy enough to use diff type of RAM.
    >>>Well... either that ram slot is stuffed or the earlier applies.
    >>
    >>Not quite. Dell motherboards do not use crazy memory. Just as with any
    >>other
    >>name brand, there are specifications as to the type of memory required,
    >>but I
    >>have not yet run into a Dell motherboard specification that does not
    >>require
    >>some kind of standard memory. The days are long past when a name brand
    >>company
    >>can afford to have both motherboard and memory designed to meet a
    >>proprietary
    >>standard. All one needs to do is to read the specifications and buy
    >>memory
    >> that meets the spec.
    >>
    >>In the case of a Dell Dimension 4100, common vanilla PC133 non-parity
    >>168-pin
    >>DIMMs will suffice. To err in favor of greater success, memory with
    >> low-density chips (i.e. more chips per DIMM) should be used.
    >
    > Yeah. That "low-density" specification for the 4100 is the thing that
    > threw me on just buying vanilla PC133 off the web as I couldn't find
    > reliable info on how to identify "low-density". [And a note for Uncle
    > Bully: Thanks for your interest, but the 4100 will only go to a max
    > of 512 MB fitted as 2*256.]
    >
    >>As a rule, Dell servers require some sort of ECC memory. Dell systems
    >>with
    >>RAMBUS memory require certain minimum speeds, and some require ECC RAMBUS.
    >>Dimension systems which use DDR memory require memory of a minimum speed.
    >>And
    >>so it goes... Ben Myers
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.


    I'd advise pulling the Dimension 4100 RAM spec from www.crucial.com , and
    then locating a DIMM(s) that match off of an auction site or cheaply from a
    local retailer.

    If you can match the spec that's over at Crucial with a used DIMM and save
    some money, I'd do it.


    Stew
  8. Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    In article <iEXEe.23391$Wt3.21030@bignews3.bellsouth.net>,
    "S.Lewis" <stew1960@mail.com> wrote:
    >"Phred" <ppnerkDELETETHIS@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >news:3khdggFueunbU1@individual.net...
    >> In article <42e2c1ec.32911533@nntp.charter.net>, ben_myers_spam_me_not
    >> at charter.net wrote:
    [snip]
    >>>In the case of a Dell Dimension 4100, common vanilla PC133 non-parity
    >>>168-pin DIMMs will suffice. To err in favor of greater success, memory
    >>>with low-density chips (i.e. more chips per DIMM) should be used.
    >>
    >> Yeah. That "low-density" specification for the 4100 is the thing that
    >> threw me on just buying vanilla PC133 off the web as I couldn't find
    >> reliable info on how to identify "low-density". [And a note for Uncle
    >> Bully: Thanks for your interest, but the 4100 will only go to a max
    >> of 512 MB fitted as 2*256.]
    [...]
    >I'd advise pulling the Dimension 4100 RAM spec from www.crucial.com , and
    >then locating a DIMM(s) that match off of an auction site or cheaply from a
    >local retailer.
    >If you can match the spec that's over at Crucial with a used DIMM and save
    >some money, I'd do it.

    Thanks Stew. Interestingly, Dell specs for the 4100 indicate CL3
    <http://docs.us.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dzuul/specs.htm>
    whereas the Crucial's primary recommendation is CL2 (256MB chip).
    <http://www.crucial.com/store/listparts.
    asp?mfr=Dell&model=Dimension+4100+Series&tabid=CR>
    though they do go on to suggest CL3 too, under their link to "All
    compatible upgrades" (and no price differential CL2/CL3 modules).
    <http://www.crucial.com/store/listparts.
    asp?model=Dimension+4100+Series&tabid=AM>

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    ppnerkDELETE@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
  9. Archived from groups: aus.computers,alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Phred" <ppnerkDELETETHIS@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:3kjr3oFu9fqbU1@individual.net...
    > In article <iEXEe.23391$Wt3.21030@bignews3.bellsouth.net>,
    > "S.Lewis" <stew1960@mail.com> wrote:
    >>"Phred" <ppnerkDELETETHIS@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >>news:3khdggFueunbU1@individual.net...
    >>> In article <42e2c1ec.32911533@nntp.charter.net>, ben_myers_spam_me_not
    >>> at charter.net wrote:
    > [snip]
    >>>>In the case of a Dell Dimension 4100, common vanilla PC133 non-parity
    >>>>168-pin DIMMs will suffice. To err in favor of greater success, memory
    >>>>with low-density chips (i.e. more chips per DIMM) should be used.
    >>>
    >>> Yeah. That "low-density" specification for the 4100 is the thing that
    >>> threw me on just buying vanilla PC133 off the web as I couldn't find
    >>> reliable info on how to identify "low-density". [And a note for Uncle
    >>> Bully: Thanks for your interest, but the 4100 will only go to a max
    >>> of 512 MB fitted as 2*256.]
    > [...]
    >>I'd advise pulling the Dimension 4100 RAM spec from www.crucial.com , and
    >>then locating a DIMM(s) that match off of an auction site or cheaply from
    >>a
    >>local retailer.
    >>If you can match the spec that's over at Crucial with a used DIMM and save
    >>some money, I'd do it.
    >
    > Thanks Stew. Interestingly, Dell specs for the 4100 indicate CL3
    > <http://docs.us.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dzuul/specs.htm>
    > whereas the Crucial's primary recommendation is CL2 (256MB chip).
    > <http://www.crucial.com/store/listparts.
    > asp?mfr=Dell&model=Dimension+4100+Series&tabid=CR>
    > though they do go on to suggest CL3 too, under their link to "All
    > compatible upgrades" (and no price differential CL2/CL3 modules).
    > <http://www.crucial.com/store/listparts.
    > asp?model=Dimension+4100+Series&tabid=AM>
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >


    Phred,

    They can use either - you're correct. I've forgotten now but I think my
    original DIMM in my 4100 was CL3. I believe I mixed mine with a CL2 due to
    price/availability on ebay (which defaults all to CL3).......


    Stew
Ask a new question

Read More

Dell Memory Computers