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Adding Wireless Router to Existing Network/Router ?

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Anonymous
June 24, 2004 2:21:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

My home is hardwired with a central DSL modem and router in a closet.
My office computer is connected to the modem/router via an Ethernet
wall jack. I would like to add a wireless router to my office computer
while leaving the regular router and modem connected and working for
the entire system.

I don't want to have to buy wireless cards for all my home computers
but would like to access the office computer wirelessly from several
laptops.

Can I simply connect the the wireless router to the office wall jack
and my office computer? If so, how do I address the wireless router to
talk to the main router/dsl modem?

The setup would look like this:

External cable> dsl modem> router> cat 5 cable to office> wireless
router> office computer.

Thanks.
Anonymous
June 24, 2004 10:23:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

drs2talk@hotmail.com (drs) wrote in
news:D fdbd3b0.0406240921.b9c97a@posting.google.com:

> Can I simply connect the the wireless router to the office wall jack
> and my office computer? If so, how do I address the wireless router to
> talk to the main router/dsl modem?

You either buy an Access point or turn your wireless router into an access
point.

--
Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
Anonymous
June 25, 2004 12:17:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

drs <drs2talk@hotmail.com> wrote:
> My home is hardwired with a central DSL modem and router in a closet.
> My office computer is connected to the modem/router via an Ethernet
> wall jack. I would like to add a wireless router to my office computer
> while leaving the regular router and modem connected and working for
> the entire system.

Do you want to connect your office computer via wireless?
Or do you want to leave everything as it is, but also be able to connect a new
system via wireless?

> I don't want to have to buy wireless cards for all my home computers
> but would like to access the office computer wirelessly from several
> laptops.

No need for that.

> Can I simply connect the the wireless router to the office wall jack
> and my office computer? If so, how do I address the wireless router to
> talk to the main router/dsl modem?

Probably.

> The setup would look like this:

> External cable> dsl modem> router> cat 5 cable to office> wireless
> router> office computer.

With most wireless routers, you can set the WAN address to something static
(so that it doesn't hang waiting for DHCP) and turn off the DHCP server in
the new router. Plug the existing cable into a LAN port on the new router,
and plug your office computer into another of the LAN ports. If you don't
get a "link" on the feed from the old router, you might need a crossover
cable instead of a normal one.

If all you want to do is surf the web, and not talk between computers in
your house for file and print sharing, you can plug the existing cable into
the WAN port of the wireless router. That gives some strange addressing,
but you'll probably never notice unless you try to share something across
the router's two networks.

You could also buy a WAP instead of a wireless router if you are going to
connect your office computer wirelessly, and have no wired connections at
that location. Those used to be more expensive, but not so much anymore.

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
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Anonymous
June 25, 2004 12:57:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Clarence,

I tried your solution and at first had no luck. I just couldn't get
the wireless router to talk to the internet or other computers. I did
some further research and found a Netgear note suggesting removing
Windows XP Hotfix Q815485. A link (or do a search on Netgear for
'hotfix') to the Netgear article discussing this problem is:
http://kbserver.netgear.com/query.idq?OriginalQuery=hot...

Once I removed the Hotfix, your solution worked as advertised.

Many thanks.


Summary:
Changed static address of wireless router.
Disabled DHCP on wireless router.
Plugged the office computer line into one of the wireless LAN ports.
Connected the wireless and wired routers with a cable between 2 LAN
ports.
(I think I ended up using a crossover cable)
Left the WAN port on the wireless router unplugged.
Anonymous
June 25, 2004 9:08:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On 24 Jun 2004 10:21:00 -0700, drs2talk@hotmail.com (drs) wrote:

>My home is hardwired with a central DSL modem and router in a closet.
>My office computer is connected to the modem/router via an Ethernet
>wall jack. I would like to add a wireless router to my office computer
>while leaving the regular router and modem connected and working for
>the entire system.
>
>I don't want to have to buy wireless cards for all my home computers
>but would like to access the office computer wirelessly from several
>laptops.
>
>Can I simply connect the the wireless router to the office wall jack
>and my office computer? If so, how do I address the wireless router to
>talk to the main router/dsl modem?
>
>The setup would look like this:
>
>External cable> dsl modem> router> cat 5 cable to office> wireless
>router> office computer.
>
>Thanks.

You should be able to connect a wireless router/access point to
your existing ethernet. I've connected a netgear wireless router
to a d-link wireless router, with the d-link assigning an ip
address to the netgear. I had to manually asign the DNS server IP
addresses in the netgear, but other wise I could access the net
wirelessly via either router. Should also work connecting a
wireless router to a non-wireless router. Not sure how it would
work with file sharing and such between all the computers on your
lan. You should be able to assign a static lan IP address to the
wireless router to fix those types of issues.
Anonymous
July 3, 2004 1:01:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Why do things the hard way, Just add a WAP (wireless access point) to your
wired network. Using an additional router will cause redundant NAT issues
that can cause complete loss of connectivity depending on the interaction
between the two routers. If you really want to simplify things you could
simply replace the current router with a typical wireless router that
generally also has four wired Ethernet ports as well (they are also
available with eight or more wired ports at additional expense).


"drs" <drs2talk@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:D fdbd3b0.0406240921.b9c97a@posting.google.com...
> My home is hardwired with a central DSL modem and router in a closet.
> My office computer is connected to the modem/router via an Ethernet
> wall jack. I would like to add a wireless router to my office computer
> while leaving the regular router and modem connected and working for
> the entire system.
>
> I don't want to have to buy wireless cards for all my home computers
> but would like to access the office computer wirelessly from several
> laptops.
>
> Can I simply connect the the wireless router to the office wall jack
> and my office computer? If so, how do I address the wireless router to
> talk to the main router/dsl modem?
>
> The setup would look like this:
>
> External cable> dsl modem> router> cat 5 cable to office> wireless
> router> office computer.
>
> Thanks.
!